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6 Crazy Activities To Try This Weekend

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6 Crazy Activities To Try This Weekend

Everyone always looks forward to the weekend, it signals the end of a long boring working week for most of us. Do you think about your weekend though and realize you have nothing fun planned and no ideas of what to fill your weekend with? Try something new! Have a look at these activities you should totally try this weekend.

1. Anti-Gravity Yoga

You might think hanging from the ceiling in a silk hammock and working out is further down on your list of things you want to do on the weekend, but it’s really accessible and a completely new way to experience yoga. It’s great for anyone whether you are a yoga master or just a beginner, although it isn’t suited for women who are pregnant. Anti-gravity yoga has advantages over standard yoga as it allows you to try out different positions called inversions which causes blood to rush to your head which is great for your thyroid and pituitary glands. The style of this kind of yoga also improves blood flow, can help to increase strength and flexibility, and will stretch out your spine. Find out locations all over the world here!

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2. Skydiving

If you enjoy thrill or just want to challenge yourself then skydiving is perfect for you, approximately 3.1 million skydives take place every year so why not be one of the 3.1 million!  People have been jumping from 15,000 feet since the 18th Century when a Frenchman called Andre Garnerin in fact jumped from a hot air balloon. Freefalling during a skydive can last anywhere between 45 seconds and 80 seconds and you could reach a speed of up to 130 mph. I recently did my first skydive in my home area of Cambridgeshire where the centre take a video of your dive for you! Definitely somewhere to check out if you’re in the UK.

3. Run 5K for Charity

Feeling charitable this weekend? Find a local fun run and sign up, get your friends involved and make them run with you (or walk, after all it is for fun). There are lots of different charities you can support and some races are specifically organized for certain charities. Not only are there a range of charities but there are also different types of runs you can take part in where you can dress up or get covered in colored powder on a color run.

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4. Zip Lining

Zooming along a zip-line in a beautiful location is an exhilarating way to spend part of your weekend, as there are over 700 zip-line courses worldwide you’ll be sure to find one near you. Is it great views you’re after? Then check these amazing zipline tours out. Worried about it being unsafe? Be assured that even though zip-line cable is only half an inch wide but it has a break strength of 22,000 pounds even an 8-ton male African elephant could hang from a zip-line and not break that cable (although he would probably be too big for the harness).

Just remember to make sure you wear the correct footwear when you go zip-lining and leave the flip flops at home because if your flip flop falls off the last thing everyone will want to do is waste valuable zip-lining time looking for your lonely sandal, don’t be that guy.

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5. Indoor Rock Climbing

If the weather isn’t looking excellent for your weekend or you don’t have access to a real cliff face to climb on (although this isn’t recommended unless you’re a rock climbing expert) then indoor rock climbing is your solution as the artificial structures are built to mimic the experience of climbing a real rock. When you go to a climbing centre there are lots of really helpful, experienced staff who will set you up with all of the safety equipment and spot you as you climb as you are always attached to a member of staff who will stop you from falling. With lots of different difficulties of walls to try, there will always be something for everyone to try.

6. Zorbing

Rolling down a hill while sealed inside a giant transparent inflated plastic orb, why not? Loads of companies offer fantastic zorbing experiences where they have their own custom built runs down different gradients and terrains of hill. If you’re not in to rolling down a hill at speed you could try the water alternative, still sealed inside the plastic ball you can then walk or roll around on water. Find out more about zorbing here!

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Featured photo credit: Dollar Photo Club via dollarphotoclub.com

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Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

“Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

Food is a universal necessity.

It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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