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This Is What Will Happen To Your Body When You Become A Vegetarian

This Is What Will Happen To Your Body When You Become A Vegetarian

Vegetarianism is defined as the practice of abstaining from the consumption of meat. Although I’m an occasional meat eater, I’ve straddled the vegetarian line on a few occasions. The first attempt was during a month-long challenge and out of convenience, I simply substituted all meat with eggs. There are some very noticeable changes you can expect when removing meat from your diet. These changes occur very quickly, usually within a day or two of your last carnivorous meal.

1. You’ll shed pounds

This is the first change and the most obvious. The third day of vegetarianism for me showed significant weight loss, visible in every area of my body. Although this is from personal experience, a recent publication in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics confirms that abstaining from meat could lead to natural weight loss. According to the research, the noted weight loss average is 7.5 pounds, possibly more based on a longer abstinence from meat products.

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2. You’ll have improved digestion

Your body is naturally detoxing and your digestive system doesn’t have to work so hard to process heavy meats. Meat can sometimes slow down your digestive tract if consumed with high-fiber plant foods or dairy products. Meats like pork take almost five hours to digest.

It’s worth noting that there isn’t any difference in the function and process of the digestive system, whether you consume meat or not. However, as stated above, ingesting both meat and plant-based foods can “alter your bacterial profile,” slowing your digestion. Positively, an increase in plant-based foods drastically reduces your risk against cardiovascular diseases.

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3. You’ll experience some bloating

Assuming that you’re now adopting a plant-based diet, rich with vegetables and fruits, prepare to experience some excessive gas, as healthy foods are usually foods that cause gas.

Tony Smithson, spokesman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetic, explains that the bacteria that live in our guts love the unique carbs found in legumes (called oligosaccharides) and when they consume them, the bacteria produce nitrogen gas, which is then released through the body. Another reason is because a lot of healthy foods, such as beans and grains, are high in fiber, which results in an increased production of gas and bloating. The benefits and rewards of consuming these highly nutritious foods will eventually improve your gastrointestinal function to reduce constipation.

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4. You’ll have different eating habits

Along with the cheaper grocery bill, your tastebuds might go through an adjustment period once you go vegetarian. This can be attributed to the reduction of protein and other vitamins directly available through meat, most considerably Zinc, which has many functions within the body. A study led out of the Institute of Health Bioscience at the University of Tokushima in Japan found that a Zinc deficiency results in a change and impairment in taste.

Lacking the natural vitamins your body needs is a notable shift for new vegetarians, therefore you have to replace necessary nutrients and dietary components like Zinc, Protein, B12 and Iron through other foods or supplements.

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5. Your body will take longer to recover from workouts

As mentioned, the reduction in protein, which is essential for building, maintaining, and repairing muscles, might impact your workouts. This is an easy fix, as there are numerous sources of protein available from plant foods, ranging from nuts and beans to powdered supplements and liquid formulas.

6. You’ll gain newfound respect for your body

Going vegetarian is an active effort and a conscious choice. It means verifying restaurant menus prior to a meal out and being aware of the food that you eat. Whether this change is a trial or a long-term decision, the discipline required to be a vegetarian will not only benefit you physically, but inevitably leak into other aspects of your life.

You will appreciate real, living foods and the newfound agility you have with a lighter body. A number of studies examining the benefits of being a vegetarian suggest that vegetarians, on average, are more physically active, drink less alcohol, and smoke less than the general population. They also have a lower prevalence for being overweight or obese.

Featured photo credit: Eat your vegetables, they’re good for you by David Saddler via flickr.com

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Jolie Adam

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

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Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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