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This Is What Will Happen To Your Body When You Become A Vegetarian

This Is What Will Happen To Your Body When You Become A Vegetarian

Vegetarianism is defined as the practice of abstaining from the consumption of meat. Although I’m an occasional meat eater, I’ve straddled the vegetarian line on a few occasions. The first attempt was during a month-long challenge and out of convenience, I simply substituted all meat with eggs. There are some very noticeable changes you can expect when removing meat from your diet. These changes occur very quickly, usually within a day or two of your last carnivorous meal.

1. You’ll shed pounds

This is the first change and the most obvious. The third day of vegetarianism for me showed significant weight loss, visible in every area of my body. Although this is from personal experience, a recent publication in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics confirms that abstaining from meat could lead to natural weight loss. According to the research, the noted weight loss average is 7.5 pounds, possibly more based on a longer abstinence from meat products.

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2. You’ll have improved digestion

Your body is naturally detoxing and your digestive system doesn’t have to work so hard to process heavy meats. Meat can sometimes slow down your digestive tract if consumed with high-fiber plant foods or dairy products. Meats like pork take almost five hours to digest.

It’s worth noting that there isn’t any difference in the function and process of the digestive system, whether you consume meat or not. However, as stated above, ingesting both meat and plant-based foods can “alter your bacterial profile,” slowing your digestion. Positively, an increase in plant-based foods drastically reduces your risk against cardiovascular diseases.

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3. You’ll experience some bloating

Assuming that you’re now adopting a plant-based diet, rich with vegetables and fruits, prepare to experience some excessive gas, as healthy foods are usually foods that cause gas.

Tony Smithson, spokesman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetic, explains that the bacteria that live in our guts love the unique carbs found in legumes (called oligosaccharides) and when they consume them, the bacteria produce nitrogen gas, which is then released through the body. Another reason is because a lot of healthy foods, such as beans and grains, are high in fiber, which results in an increased production of gas and bloating. The benefits and rewards of consuming these highly nutritious foods will eventually improve your gastrointestinal function to reduce constipation.

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4. You’ll have different eating habits

Along with the cheaper grocery bill, your tastebuds might go through an adjustment period once you go vegetarian. This can be attributed to the reduction of protein and other vitamins directly available through meat, most considerably Zinc, which has many functions within the body. A study led out of the Institute of Health Bioscience at the University of Tokushima in Japan found that a Zinc deficiency results in a change and impairment in taste.

Lacking the natural vitamins your body needs is a notable shift for new vegetarians, therefore you have to replace necessary nutrients and dietary components like Zinc, Protein, B12 and Iron through other foods or supplements.

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5. Your body will take longer to recover from workouts

As mentioned, the reduction in protein, which is essential for building, maintaining, and repairing muscles, might impact your workouts. This is an easy fix, as there are numerous sources of protein available from plant foods, ranging from nuts and beans to powdered supplements and liquid formulas.

6. You’ll gain newfound respect for your body

Going vegetarian is an active effort and a conscious choice. It means verifying restaurant menus prior to a meal out and being aware of the food that you eat. Whether this change is a trial or a long-term decision, the discipline required to be a vegetarian will not only benefit you physically, but inevitably leak into other aspects of your life.

You will appreciate real, living foods and the newfound agility you have with a lighter body. A number of studies examining the benefits of being a vegetarian suggest that vegetarians, on average, are more physically active, drink less alcohol, and smoke less than the general population. They also have a lower prevalence for being overweight or obese.

Featured photo credit: Eat your vegetables, they’re good for you by David Saddler via flickr.com

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Jolie Adam

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

The Best Way to Create a Vision for the Life You Want

Creating a vision for your life might seem like a frivolous, fantastical waste of time, but it’s not: creating a compelling vision of the life you want is actually one of the most effective strategies for achieving the life of your dreams. Perhaps the best way to look at the concept of a life vision is as a compass to help guide you to take the best actions and make the right choices that help propel you toward your best life.

your vision of where or who you want to be is the greatest asset you have

    Why You Need a Vision

    Experts and life success stories support the idea that with a vision in mind, you are more likely to succeed far beyond what you could otherwise achieve without a clear vision. Think of crafting your life vision as mapping a path to your personal and professional dreams. Life satisfaction and personal happiness are within reach. The harsh reality is that if you don’t develop your own vision, you’ll allow other people and circumstances to direct the course of your life.

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    How to Create Your Life Vision

    Don’t expect a clear and well-defined vision overnight—envisioning your life and determining the course you will follow requires time, and reflection. You need to cultivate vision and perspective, and you also need to apply logic and planning for the practical application of your vision. Your best vision blossoms from your dreams, hopes, and aspirations. It will resonate with your values and ideals, and will generate energy and enthusiasm to help strengthen your commitment to explore the possibilities of your life.

    What Do You Want?

    The question sounds deceptively simple, but it’s often the most difficult to answer. Allowing yourself to explore your deepest desires can be very frightening. You may also not think you have the time to consider something as fanciful as what you want out of life, but it’s important to remind yourself that a life of fulfillment does not usually happen by chance, but by design.

    It’s helpful to ask some thought-provoking questions to help you discover the possibilities of what you want out of life. Consider every aspect of your life, personal and professional, tangible and intangible. Contemplate all the important areas, family and friends, career and success, health and quality of life, spiritual connection and personal growth, and don’t forget about fun and enjoyment.

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    Some tips to guide you:

    • Remember to ask why you want certain things
    • Think about what you want, not on what you don’t want.
    • Give yourself permission to dream.
    • Be creative. Consider ideas that you never thought possible.
    • Focus on your wishes, not what others expect of you.

    Some questions to start your exploration:

    • What really matters to you in life? Not what should matter, what does matter.
    • What would you like to have more of in your life?
    • Set aside money for a moment; what do you want in your career?
    • What are your secret passions and dreams?
    • What would bring more joy and happiness into your life?
    • What do you want your relationships to be like?
    • What qualities would you like to develop?
    • What are your values? What issues do you care about?
    • What are your talents? What’s special about you?
    • What would you most like to accomplish?
    • What would legacy would you like to leave behind?

    It may be helpful to write your thoughts down in a journal or creative vision board if you’re the creative type. Add your own questions, and ask others what they want out of life. Relax and make this exercise fun. You may want to set your answers aside for a while and come back to them later to see if any have changed or if you have anything to add.

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    What Would Your Best Life Look Like?

    Describe your ideal life in detail. Allow yourself to dream and imagine, and create a vivid picture. If you can’t visualize a picture, focus on how your best life would feel. If you find it difficult to envision your life 20 or 30 years from now, start with five years—even a few years into the future will give you a place to start. What you see may surprise you. Set aside preconceived notions. This is your chance to dream and fantasize.

    A few prompts to get you started:

    • What will you have accomplished already?
    • How will you feel about yourself?
    • What kind of people are in your life? How do you feel about them?
    • What does your ideal day look like?
    • Where are you? Where do you live? Think specifics, what city, state, or country, type of community, house or an apartment, style and atmosphere.
    • What would you be doing?
    • Are you with another person, a group of people, or are you by yourself?
    • How are you dressed?
    • What’s your state of mind? Happy or sad? Contented or frustrated?
    • What does your physical body look like? How do you feel about that?
    • Does your best life make you smile and make your heart sing? If it doesn’t, dig deeper, dream bigger.

    It’s important to focus on the result, or at least a way-point in your life. Don’t think about the process for getting there yet—that’s the next stepGive yourself permission to revisit this vision every day, even if only for a few minutes. Keep your vision alive and in the front of your mind.

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    Plan Backwards

    It may sound counter-intuitive to plan backwards rather than forwards, but when you’re planning your life from the end result, it’s often more useful to consider the last step and work your way back to the first. This is actually a valuable and practical strategy for making your vision a reality.

    • What’s the last thing that would’ve had to happen to achieve your best life?
    • What’s the most important choice you would’ve had to make?
    • What would you have needed to learn along the way?
    • What important actions would you have had to take?
    • What beliefs would you have needed to change?
    • What habits or behaviors would you have had to cultivate?
    • What type of support would you have had to enlist?
    • How long will it have taken you to realize your best life?
    • What steps or milestones would you have needed to reach along the way?

    Now it’s time to think about your first step, and the next step after that. Ponder the gap between where you are now and where you want to be in the future. It may seem impossible, but it’s quite achievable if you take it step-by-step.

    It’s important to revisit this vision from time to time. Don’t be surprised if your answers to the questions, your technicolor vision, and the resulting plans change. That can actually be a very good thing; as you change in unforeseeable ways, the best life you envision will change as well. For now, it’s important to use the process, create your vision, and take the first step towards making that vision a reality.

    Featured photo credit: Matt Noble via unsplash.com

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