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NO MORE TAKEAWAY! 6 Easy Chinese Food Recipes You Shouldn’t Miss!

NO MORE TAKEAWAY! 6 Easy Chinese Food Recipes You Shouldn’t Miss!

How can we ever resist the exotic blend of herbs and spices that bring about the different burst of flavors we get from takeout Chinese food? Although takeaways are extremely tasty and super convenient when we need a quick fix, Chinese food can be laden with too much salt.

Why not try out these 6 easy Chinese food recipes that we have picked out for you? They will definitely have your friends stunned and impressed by how delicious the dishes are! Besides, it is much cheaper and healthier to cook at home.

This Chinese-style steamed fish is nearly impossible to overcook, and the sauce is incredibly easy to make.

    1. Simple Steamed Fish 

    Sounds simple enough? Yes, it is, but you mustn’t underestimate the exquisite taste of steamed fish in the oriental style. It’s almost similar to the Mediterranean style; however, this dish is more savory than sour.

    Ingredients:

    1 Whole White Fish
    1 Bunch of Green Onions
    Fresh Cilantro
    1 Large Piece of Ginger
    3 tbsp of Canola Oil
    1/4 cup of superior soya sauce
    1 tbsp of cane sugar

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    Method:

    1. Prepare and clean fish thoroughly, leaving the head, fin, and tail on.
    2. Cut ginger and green onions into large pieces. Slice remaining into thin matchstick slices.
    3. Arrange 3-5 larger green onion and ginger pieces onto a steaming plate. Place the fish on top. Place green onion and ginger pieces into the belly
    4. Steam the fish for 15-18 minutes (or until done).
    5. Sauté the oil, soya sauce, and sugar. Cook and infuse the flavors for 1-2 minutes.
    6. Remove the steamed fish and place onto a serving platter. Arrange the remaining garnish on top.
    7. Pour the hot oil/sauce mixture directly over the garnish and fish. Serve the fish whole.

    Authentic Japanese chicken teriyaki.

      2. Chicken Teriyaki

      With a nice tangy glaze over the chicken, this dish is perfect for a simple Chinese dinner.

      Ingredients:

      2 tbsp of mirin
      2 tbsp of soya sauce
      2 tbsp of sake
      1 tbsp of sugar
      1 tsp of finely grated ginger
      2 chicken thighs (boneless)
      1 tbps of cooking oil

      Method:

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      1. In a small bowl, mix mirin, soya sauce, sake, and sugar.
      2. Heat oil in a skillet.
      3. Lay the chicken in the skillet (skin side down) for 6-7 minutes, or until brown. Flip over to cook for 2-3 minutes.
      4. Turn heat off and remove chicken. Remove oil by patting paper towel to soak oil.
      5. Heat the soya sauce mixture in skillet and simmer for 3 minutes until it thickens.
      6. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook chicken with sauce for a minute
      7. Remove from heat and let rest for 3 – 5 minutes. Cut and serve with rice and vegetables.

      20130103-singapore-noodles-bee-hoon2

        3. Dried Prawn Noodles 

        This dish has gained international acclaim for its versatility and (obviously) its taste, which everyone falls in love with almost instantly.

        Ingredients:

        1 handful of dried shrimp
        1 handful of dried shitake mushrooms (about 5, depending on their size)
        1 handful or bunch of dried rice vermicelli (about 100grams)
        1 Chinese tablespoon oyster sauce
        1 Chinese tablespoon mix of light soy and dark soy sauce
        4 – 5 cloves garlic, chopped
        1 handful of Chinese greens, cut into 3 inch pieces
        2 – 3 tablespoons fried shallot oil
        A bit of sesame oil and sugar
        Ground white pepper to taste

        Method:

        1. Soak the shrimps in hot water for 30 minutes.
        2. Soak the mushrooms in hot water for 30 minutes.
        3. Soak the rice vermicelli in room temperature water for 20 minutes.
        4. Drain both the shrimp and mushrooms. Keep the soaking liquid, then add the oyster and soy sauce.
        5. Slice the mushrooms (removing the stems) and marinade them in a bit of soy, sesame oil, and sugar.
        6. Chop garlic.
        7. Heat some shallot oil in a wok, then add the garlic and stir until you can smell the aroma.
        8. Add shrimps and fry, until you can smell the aroma.
        9. Add the mushrooms and fry them all together. Then throw in your drained noodles.
        10. Toss and add the reserved liquid. Keep frying and tossing, for about 5 minutes.
        11. Add the greens and fry again for about 1 minute. Turn off the heat, and add a bit of extra sesame oil (or finely ground white pepper, if you like).

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        Sesame-Chicken-with-Stir-Fried-VegetablesNEW-PHOTO

          4. Quick Chicken and Vegetables Stir Fry

          Ingredients:

          Chicken Tenders
          1 egg
          cornstarch
          cabbage
          1 chopped onion
          red peppers
          string beans
          1 tbsp vegetable cooking oil
          1 tbsp soya bean chili paste
          1 tsp Grated ginger
          1 chopped clove garlic
          1 tsp black pepper
          1 tbsp sherry cooking wine
          1 tbsp sesame oil

          Method:

          1. Marinade chicken tenders with 2 tbsp of egg white and 2 tbsp of cornstarch.
          2. Heat oil in skillet.
          3. Cook garlic and ginger until you can smell the aroma.
          4. Cook chicken tenders for 2-3 minutes.
          5. Stir in red peppers, string beans, onions.
          6. Add in soya bean chilli paste.
          7. Add in black pepper, sherry cooking wine, and sesame oil.
          8. Sir fry for 1 minute and serve.

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          fried-rice-11

            5. Chinese Fried Rice

            Ingredients:

            3/4 cup finely chopped onion
            2 1/2 tablespoons oil
            1 egg, lightly beaten (or more eggs if you like)
            3 drops soy sauce
            3 drops sesame oil
            8 ounces cooked lean boneless pork or 8 ounces chicken, chopped
            1/2cup finely chopped carrot (very small)
            1/2 cup frozen peas, thawed
            4 cups cold cooked rice, grains separated (preferably medium grain)
            4 green onions, chopped
            2 cups bean sprouts
            2 tablespoons light soy sauce (add more if you like)

            Method:

            1. Heat 1 tbsp oil in wok and add chopped onions. Stir-fry until onions turn a nice brown color (about 8-10 minutes). Remove from wok.
            2. Allow wok to cool slightly.
            3. Mix egg with 3 drops of soy and 3 drops of sesame oil. Set aside.
            4. Add 1/2 tbsp oil to wok, swirling to coat surfaces. Add egg mixture. Working quickly, swirl egg until egg sets against wok. When egg puffs, flip egg and cook other side briefly. Remove from wok, and chop egg into small pieces.
            5. Heat 1 tbsp oil in wok, then add selected meat to wok, along with carrots, peas, and cooked onion. Stir-fry for 2 minutes.
            6. Add rice, green onions, and bean sprouts, tossing to mix well. Stir-fry for 3 minutes.
            7. Add 2 tbsp of light soy sauce and chopped egg to rice mixture and fold in. Stir-fry for 1 minute more. Serve.
            8. Set out additional soy sauce on the table, if desired.

            04022014-stirfry-beef-with-mixed-mushroom-and-butter-15-edit-thumb-625xauto-396067

              6. Stir Fried Beef With Oyster Sauce

              Ingredients:

              450g lean beef steak
              1 tbsp light soy sauce
              2 tsp sesame oil
              1 tbsp Shaoxing rice wine or dry Sherry
              2 tsp cornflour
              3 tbsp groundnut oil
              1 red pepper, cut into chunky dice
              1 green pepper, cut into chunky dice
              3 tbsp oyster sauce
              3 spring onions

              Method:

              1. Cut the beef into slices 5cm long and 5mm thick, cutting against the grain of the meat. Put them in a bowl. Mix in the soy sauce, sesame oil, rice wine (or Sherry), and cornflour. Leave to marinate for 20 mins.
              2. Heat a wok until it is very hot, then add the groundnut oil. When it is slightly smoking, add the beef slices and stir-fry for 5 mins or until lightly browned. Remove the meat from the wok and drain well in a colander set inside a bowl. Discard the drained oil.
              3. Wipe the wok clean and reheat it over a high heat. Add the peppers, and cook for 3-4 mins (or until softened). Add the oyster sauce and bring it to a simmer. Return the drained beef slices to the wok and toss them thoroughly with the oyster sauce. Turn the mixture on to a serving platter, top with the spring onions and serve immediately.

              Featured photo credit: Chinese Food via newcastlediggers.com.au

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              Lim Kairen

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              Last Updated on April 8, 2020

              Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

              Why Assuming Positive Intent Is an Amazing Productivity Driver

              Assuming positive intent is an important contributor to quality of life.

              Most people appreciate the dividends such a mindset produces in the realm of relationships. How can relationships flourish when you don’t assume intentions that may or may not be there? And how their partner can become an easier person to be around as a result of such a shift? Less appreciated in the GTD world, however, is the productivity aspect of this “assume positive intent” perspective.

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              Most of us are guilty of letting our minds get distracted, our energy sapped, or our harmony compromised by thinking about what others woulda, coulda, shoulda.  How we got wronged by someone else.  How a friend could have been more respectful.  How a family member could have been less selfish.

              However, once we evolve to understanding the folly of this mindset, we feel freer and we become more productive professionally due to the minimization of unhelpful, distracting thoughts.

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              The leap happens when we realize two things:

              1. The self serving benefit from giving others the benefit of the doubt.
              2. The logic inherent in the assumption that others either have many things going on in their lives paving the way for misunderstandings.

              Needless to say, this mindset does not mean that we ought to not confront people that are creating havoc in our world.  There are times when we need to call someone out for inflicting harm in our personal lives or the lives of others.

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              Indra Nooyi, Chairman and CEO of Pepsi, says it best in an interview with Fortune magazine:

              My father was an absolutely wonderful human being. From ecent emailhim I learned to always assume positive intent. Whatever anybody says or does, assume positive intent. You will be amazed at how your whole approach to a person or problem becomes very different. When you assume negative intent, you’re angry. If you take away that anger and assume positive intent, you will be amazed. Your emotional quotient goes up because you are no longer almost random in your response. You don’t get defensive. You don’t scream. You are trying to understand and listen because at your basic core you are saying, ‘Maybe they are saying something to me that I’m not hearing.’ So ‘assume positive intent’ has been a huge piece of advice for me.

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              In business, sometimes in the heat of the moment, people say things. You can either misconstrue what they’re saying and assume they are trying to put you down, or you can say, ‘Wait a minute. Let me really get behind what they are saying to understand whether they’re reacting because they’re hurt, upset, confused, or they don’t understand what it is I’ve asked them to do.’ If you react from a negative perspective – because you didn’t like the way they reacted – then it just becomes two negatives fighting each other. But when you assume positive intent, I think often what happens is the other person says, ‘Hey, wait a minute, maybe I’m wrong in reacting the way I do because this person is really making an effort.

              “Assume positive intent” is definitely a top quality of life’s best practice among the people I have met so far. The reasons are obvious. It will make you feel better, your relationships will thrive and it’s an approach more greatly aligned with reality.  But less understood is how such a shift in mindset brings your professional game to a different level.

              Not only does such a shift make you more likable to your colleagues, but it also unleashes your talents further through a more focused, less distracted mind.

              More Tips About Building Positive Relationships

              Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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