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12 Practical Ways to Eat Healthy (While Keeping Your Grocery Bill Low)

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12 Practical Ways to Eat Healthy (While Keeping Your Grocery Bill Low)

Do you want to spend less on your grocery shopping while still eating healthily? Many people think that healthy eating is expensive, but there are tips and tricks you can use to make sure you eat healthy food without spending too much.

Just check out these 12 practical ways to eat healthy, while keeping your bill manageable.

1. Buy organic food locally

Organic food is a great way to make sure you are eating healthy food, but it is often expensive in supermarkets. However, it is normally much cheaper at your local farmer’s market. Additionally, you’ll find different, fresher-than-fresh options as the seasons change.

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2. Invest in a slow cooker

A slow cooker is a great way for you to make healthy meals cheap and easy — they are perfect for making nutritious stews, sauces and soups. You can simply put the ingredient in the crock pot in the morning and you will have a hot, delicious meal ready for 5 p.m.

3. Cut down on meat

Meat is a great source of protein, but it can be quite expensive. Save some money by eating one meatless meal a day, or try eating a vegetarian diet for a few days each week. Cheap and healthy protein alternatives include tofu, beans and whole grains.

4. Add an extra day between grocery shopping

Instead of doing your grocery shop once a week, try and make your shop last eight days instead. This will help you to use up forgotten-about canned and frozen food, making your money go a little further.

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5. Use the freezer

Most people are often inclined to throw away food that has nearly reached it’s sell-by-date, but freezing it will save you money and make sure the food doesn’t get wasted. You can also buy reduced milk, meat and bread that are near their sell-by-dates. Just freeze them for later use.

6. Budget your spending

If you don’t already have a budget, set one for your grocery shopping every week — and stick to it. Once you are in a routine, take a close look at your grocery bills and see if there is anything especially expensive that you could stop buying.

This will help you to figure out what is wasting your money and what isn’t.

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7. Cut out restaurants and take-out

Eating out is expensive, and often many people don’t actually realize how often they are doing it. Drive-thru’s, take-out coffee, delivery food, cafés and restaurants are all pricey alternatives to preparing your own food and drink.

Carrying a thermos of coffee and making your own lunch are all good ways to avoid take-out temptation.

8. Buy less branded food

You don’t have to cut out your favorite branded products, but many cheaper alternatives have the same taste and nutritional value. Read the packaging to find alternatives that will taste similar, with a lower price.

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9. Price match different stores

Many people do their full grocery shop at one store, but this means they are probably missing out on savings. As mentioned in point one, farmers markets will often have cheaper organic food. And butchers are well known for better quality, cheaper meat.

Shop around and find the cheapest places so you know you are always getting value for money.

10. Buy food in bulk

Many stores offer deals where you can get more for your money by buying in bulk. Grains, nuts, spices and sweets can often be bought in bulk, and they have a long shelf life — so there is no pressure to use everything up quickly.

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11. Plan your meals at the beginning of the week

Don’t shop without deciding what you want first, as you are more likely to impulse buy expensive products you don’t need. Write a shopping list before you go, and aim to find the cheapest option in the store.

12. Buy frozen food

There is a common misconception that all frozen food is unhealthy — it simply isn’t true. Frozen vegetables and fruit still retain their nutritional value, and they are often much cheaper than the fresh alternative.

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Amy Johnson

Amy is a writer who blogs about relationships and lifestyle advice.

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Last Updated on December 2, 2021

The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

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The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

Camping can be hard work, but it’s the preparation that’s even harder. There are usually a lot of things to do in order to make sure that you and your family or friends have the perfect camping experience. But sometimes you might get to your destination and discover that you have left out one or more crucial things.

There is no dispute that preparation and organization for a camping trip can be quite overwhelming, but if it is done right, you would see at the end of the day, that it was worth the stress. This is why it is important to ensure optimum planning and execution. For this to be possible, it is advised that in addition to a to-do-list, you should have a camping checklist to remind you of every important detail.

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Why You Should Have a Camping Checklist

Creating a camping checklist makes for a happy and always ready camper. It also prevents mishaps.  A proper camping checklist should include every essential thing you would need for your camping activities, organized into various categories such as shelter, clothing, kitchen, food, personal items, first aid kit, informational items, etc. These categories should be organized by importance. However, it is important that you should not list more than you can handle or more than is necessary for your outdoor adventure.

Camping checklists vary depending on the kind of camping and outdoor activities involved. You should not go on the internet and compile a list of just any camping checklist. Of course, you can research camping checklists, but you have to put into consideration the kind of camping you are doing. It could be backpacking, camping with kids, canoe camping, social camping, etc. You have to be specific and take note of those things that are specifically important to your trip, and those things which are generally needed in all camping trips no matter the kind of camping being embarked on.

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Here are some tips to help you prepare for your next camping trip.

  1. First off, you must have found the perfect campground that best suits your outdoor adventure. If you haven’t, then you should. Sites like Reserve America can help you find and reserve a campsite.
  2. Find or create a good camping checklist that would best suit your kind of camping adventure.
  3. Make sure the whole family is involved in making out the camping check list or downloading a proper checklist that reflects the families need and ticking off the boxes of already accomplished tasks.
  4. You should make out or download a proper checklist months ahead of your trip to make room for adjustments and to avoid too much excitement and the addition of unnecessary things.
  5. Checkout Camping Hacks that would make for a more fun camping experience and prepare you for different situations.

Now on to the checklist!

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Here is how your checklist should look

1. CAMPSITE GEAR

  • Tent, poles, stakes
  • Tent footprint (ground cover for under your tent)
  • Extra tarp or canopy
  • Sleeping bag for each camper
  • Sleeping pad for each camper
  • Repair kit for pads, mattress, tent, tarp
  • Pillows
  • Extra blankets
  • Chairs
  • Headlamps or flashlights ( with extra batteries)
  • Lantern
  • Lantern fuel or batteries

2.  KITCHEN

  • Stove
  • Fuel for stove
  • Matches or lighter
  • Pot
  • French press or portable coffee maker
  • Corkscrew
  • Roasting sticks for marshmallows, hot dogs
  • Food-storage containers
  • Trash bags
  • Cooler
  • Ice
  • Water bottles
  • Plates, bowls, forks, spoons, knives
  • Cups, mugs
  • Paring knife, spatula, cooking spoon
  • Cutting board
  • Foil
  • soap
  • Sponge, dishcloth, dishtowel
  • Paper towels
  • Extra bin for washing dishes

3. CLOTHES

  • Clothes for daytime
  • Sleepwear
  • Swimsuits
  • Rainwear
  • Shoes: hiking/walking shoes, easy-on shoes, water shoes
  • Extra layers for warmth
  • Gloves
  • Hats

4. PERSONAL ITEMS

  • Sunscreen
  • Insect repellent
  • First-aid kit
  • Prescription medications
  • Toothbrush, toiletries
  • Soap

5. OTHER ITEMS

  • Camera
  • Campsite reservation confirmation, phone number
  • Maps, area information

This list is not completely exhaustive. To make things easier, you can check specialized camping sites like RealSimpleRainyAdventures, and LoveTheOutdoors that have downloadable camping checklists that you can download on your phone or gadget and check as you go.

Featured photo credit: Scott Goodwill via unsplash.com

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