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Top 6 Health Numbers To Know After Age 40

Top 6 Health Numbers To Know After Age 40

Our bodies are basically machines; the heart pumps blood through our veins, and our brains are like on-board computers, processing and storing information and monitoring our organs. So what happens as the machine ages?

Think about what happens when the hard drive of the computer you’ve had for seven years starts to make an alarming clunking noise or you’ve had to replace the brakes on your ten year-old car several times. The older the machinery gets, the more maintenance it requires.

Our bodies work much the same way. We often find ourselves obsessing a lot about age, making observations like “He’s pushing 40” or “she looks great for 75,” but age isn’t the only numeric indicator of health and longevity. HelloHeart, a company that manufactures a blood pressure monitoring app for smartphones, encourages everyone to learn about and keep an eye on key health-related numbers once you’ve passed 40, so whether you’re over the hill or puffing your way toward the crest of it, knowing these six numbers will help you to maintain your health.

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1. Blood Pressure

Your blood pressure is the number one indicator of how well your heart is functioning. Blood pressure refers to the pressure in your arteries as blood flows through them. The measurement consists of two numbers. The first number, systolic blood pressure, refers to the amount of pressure present when your heart beats. The second number, your diastolic blood pressure, refers to the amount of pressure present when the heart muscle relaxes between beats.

When your blood pressure reads as “120 over 80,” for instance, the top number refers to systolic pressure, and the bottom number refers to diastolic pressure. According to the American Heart Association, while posture and activity level can affect blood pressure, the systolic pressure reading should typically be below 120 and the diastolic below 80; 115 over 75 would be ideal. The AHA also reports that approximately one in three Americans has high blood pressure, and it’s recommended that you contact your physician if your systolic pressure exceeds 140 or your diastolic pressure reaches 90.

2. Resting heart rate

Remember that your blood pressure can fluctuate depending on posture or level of activity, so when you’re relaxing, so should your heart. As the term indicates, your resting heart rate should be less rapid than when you’re active; a healthy resting heart rate is approximately 6 beats per minute. Keeping in mind the above points about blood pressure, a rapidly beating heart while at rest can indicate high blood pressure.

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3. Cholesterol levels

Cholesterol levels measure the amount of fat in your blood. Like everything else, we need a certain amount of fat in the blood, but not too much. According to Jenna Lindsey Channell, you should avoid trans-fats and saturated fats. Unsaturated fats, however, are an important part of your diet because they’re required for absorbing certain vitamins like A, E, B, and K.

There are two types of cholesterol: LDL (low-density lipoprotein) and HDL (high-density lipoprotein). LDL is the “bad fat”—essentially plaque in your arteries. When it builds up, it creates blockages that prevent blood from flowing and can lead to heart attacks and strokes. HDL is the “good fat,” and it works to regulate LDL levels and keep your arteries clear. The fat that is stored in the body for energy after eating is called triglycerides.

Together, your LDL, HDL, and triglyceride numbers create what’s called your “lipid profile score.” Cholesterol is measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl), a unit of measurement that indicates the concentration of a substance in your blood. Desired levels will vary based on whether or not you’re at high risk for heart disease. The normal desired LDL level is below 100 if you’re not at risk for heart disease and below 70 if heart disease is a high health risk. If you have no risk factors like high blood pressure or heart disease, 100-129 is generally considered a healthy level; a number over 190 is considered high. While your LDL level shouldn’t get too high, your HDL level shouldn’t drop too low; remember that you need HDL, or “good” cholesterol in your blood to keep your arteries clean. 60 or above is usually a healthy HDL level. For men, an unhealthy level is below 40 and for women below 50. A triglyceride level of 150 is average; below 100 is ideal. Triglyceride levels over 200 are considered high.

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4. Blood sugar

Blood sugar measures the amount of glucose (a type of sugar found in carbohydrates) present in your blood. Glucose serves as the main source of your body’s energy. Blood sugar levels will usually fluctuate, increasing after you’ve eaten. If your glucose level rises and remains high over an extended period of time, it can damage your blood vessels, kidneys, eyes, and nerves.

If you have high glucose levels, blood sugar tests can help to detect diabetes, and an A1C test will provide an index of your average blood sugar levels over the past three or four months, which will give a broader, more representative picture of glucose fluctuations than a “spot test.” The A1C test measures what percentage of hemoglobin (a protein in your blood that carries oxygen) contains glucose. A healthy glucose level from a fasting blood sugar test (FBS) should fall below 100 mg/dl and not lower than 40 mg/dl. . A healthy reading from an A1C test should be less than 7.0%.

5. C-Reactive Protein (CRP)

CRP levels in your blood indicate the amount of inflammation in your blood vessels. It’s important to keep an eye on this number because there are often no symptoms associated with high CRP and therefore it can be a “silent killer.” High CRP levels are often associated with conditions like diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. A blood draw and lab test can check your CRP levels. A normal, healthy CRP level should fall below 1.0 mg/dl; a number above 3.0 mg/dl can indicate risk for heart disease.

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6. Waist size

In addition to your weight and BMI (body mass index, which measures your weight relative to your height), your waist size can also indicate your overall health. Waist size is also the easiest to measure because you don’t need to go to a doctor or schedule any tests. You just need a tape-measure. For an accurate measurement, measure your waist size at bellybutton height. For women, a healthy waist size is less than 36 inches; for men, it’s less than 40. Numbers higher than these can increase your risk for heart disease, high blood pressure, or diabetes.

As we age, we become increasingly preoccupied about numbers, but instead of counting your gray hairs or the number of wrinkles that seem to have popped up overnight, keep an eye on these six numbers to help maintain a healthy heart!

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Last Updated on July 10, 2020

How to Take Control of Your Life with Better Boundaries

How to Take Control of Your Life with Better Boundaries

We all have them—those hurtful, frustrating, offensive, manipulative people in our lives. No matter how hard we try to surround ourselves with positive and kind people, there will always be those who will disrespect, insult, berate, and misuse you if we allow them to.

We may, for a variety of reasons, not be able to avoid them, but we can determine how we interact with them and how we allow them to interact with us.

So, how to take control of your life and stop being pushed around?

Learning to set clear firm boundaries with the people in our lives at work and in our personal lives is the best way to protect ourselves from the negative effects of this kind of behavior.

What Boundaries Are (And What They’re Not)

Boundaries are limits

—they are not threats or ultimatums. Boundaries inform or teach. They are not a form of punishment.

Boundaries are firm lines—determined by you—which cannot be crossed by those around you. They are guidelines for how you will allow others to treat you and what kind of behaviors you will expect.

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Healthy personal boundaries help protect you from physical or emotional pain. You may also need to set firm boundaries at work to ensure you and your time are not disrespected. Don’t allow others to take advantage of your kindness and generosity.

Clear boundaries communicate to others that you demand respect and consideration—that you are willing to stand up for yourself and that you will not be a doormat for anyone. They are a “no trespassing” sign that makes it very clear when a line has been crossed and that there will be consequences for doing so.

Boundaries are not set with the intention of changing other people. They may change how people interact with you, but they are more about enforcing your needs than attempting to change the general behavior and attitude of others.

How to Establish Boundaries and Take Control of Your Life

Here are some ways that you can establish boundaries and take control of your life.

1. Self-Awareness Comes First

Before you can establish boundaries with others, you first need to understand what your needs are.

You are entitled to respect. You have the right to protect yourself from inappropriate or offensive behavior. Setting boundaries is a way of honoring your needs.

To set appropriate boundaries, you need to be clear about what healthy behaviors look like—what healthy relationships look like.

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You first have to become more aware of your feelings and honest with yourself about your expectations and what you feel is appropriate behavior:

  • Where do you need to establish better boundaries?
  • When do you feel disrespected?
  • When do you feel violated, frustrated, or angered by the behavior of others?
  • In what situations do you feel you are being mistreated or taken advantage of?
  • When do you want to be alone?
  • How much space do you need?

You need to honor your own needs and boundaries before you can expect others to honor them. This allows you to take control of your life.

2. Clear Communication Is Essential

Inform others clearly and directly what your expectations are. It is essential to have clear communication if you want others to respect your boundaries. Explain in an honest and respectful tone what you find offensive or unacceptable.

Many people simply aren’t aware that they are behaving inappropriately. They may never have been taught proper manners or consideration for others.

3. Be Specific but Don’t Blame

Taking a blaming or punishing attitude automatically puts people on the defensive. People will not listen when they feel attacked. It’s part of human nature.

That said, you do not need to overexplain or defend yourself. Boundaries are not open to compromise.

Sample language:

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  • “You may not…yell or raise your voice to me…”
  • “I need…to be treated with respect…”
  • “It’s not okay when…you take things from my desk without asking…”
  • “I won’t…do your work…cover for you anymore…”
  • “It’s not acceptable when…you ridicule or insult me…”
  • “I am uncomfortable when…you use offensive language”
  • “I will no longer be able to…lend you money…”

Being able to communicate these without sounding accusatory is essential if you want others to respect your boundaries so you can take control of your life.

4. Consequences Are Often Necessary

Determine what the appropriate consequences will be when boundaries are crossed. If it’s appropriate, be clear about those consequences upfront when communicating those boundaries to others.

Follow through. People won’t respect your boundaries if you don’t enforce them.

Standing our ground and forcing consequences doesn’t come easily to us. We want to be nice. We want people to like us, but we shouldn’t have to trade our self-respect to gain friends or to achieve success.

We may be tempted to let minor disrespect slide to avoid conflict, but as the familiar saying goes, “if you give people an inch, they’ll take a mile.”

It’s much easier to address offensive or inappropriate behavior now than to wait until that behavior has gotten completely out of hand.

It’s also important to remember that positive reinforcement is even more powerful than negative consequences. When people do alter the way they treat you, acknowledge it. Let people know that you notice and appreciate their efforts.

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Final Thoughts

Respect is always a valid reason for setting a boundary. Don’t defend yourself or your needs. Boundaries are often necessary to protect your time, your space, and your feelings. And these are essential if you want to take control of your life.

Start with the easiest boundaries first. Setting boundaries is a skill that needs to be practiced. Enlist support from others if necessary. Inform people immediately when they have crossed the line.

Don’t wait. Communicate politely and directly. Be clear about the consequences and follow them through.

The better you become at setting your own boundaries, the better you become at recognizing and respecting the boundaries of others.

Remember that establishing boundaries is your right. You are entitled to respect. You can’t control how other people behave, but you do have control over the way you allow people to treat you.

Learning to set boundaries is not always easy, but with time, it will become more comfortable. You may eventually find that boundaries become automatic and you no longer need to consciously set them.

They will simply become a natural extension of your self-respect.

Featured photo credit: Thomas Kelley via unsplash.com

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