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5 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Buy Bottled Water Anymore

5 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Buy Bottled Water Anymore

I recently wrote an article about why you shouldn’t re-use water bottles. Since it was so popular, I figured I’d take it a step further. Thus, this article focusing on why you shouldn’t buy bottled water at all.

Though you might be somewhat familiar with this topic, I bet you’ll be interested in reading about the latest reasons and research stating why you should skip buying bottled water when you go to the supermarket. Read on, and once you’ve finished, please let me know if you have the same attitude towards bottled water as you do now.

1. Bottled water costs you more in the long run.

We all know why we buy bottled water. It’s more convenient to grab one and go, than it is to clean and maintain a re-usable bottle, or to grab a cup and fill it up using a filter-based pitcher.

While using bottled water will save you time in the short run, it will also drain your hard-earned cash in the long run. Indeed, recent studies have shown that bottled water costs around $7.50 per gallon, which is about two thousand times as costly as the water that comes from your faucet.

Despite that fact, we continue allowing ourselves to be bamboozled by beverage companies. From 2011 to 2012, we’ve increased our combined spending on bottled water by 6.5%, making it quite a profitable industry indeed.

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2. Bottled water pollutes the environment.

According to National Geographic, folks purchase around half a billion bottles of water per week – in the United States alone.

Despite the fact that we have a much more developed municipal water infrastructure, Americans consume three times as much bottled water as Italy (the biggest water bottle market in Europe).

Unfortunately, few of those bottles are recycled, with most ending up piled high in landfills, floating around in stagnant rivers, or lodging themselves in various underwater environments.

If we really want to help mother nature, we’ve got to stop buying bottled water and look to our taps instead.

3. Bottled water isn’t any cleaner than tap water.

Despite commercials from Arrowhead and Fiji that would have you believe otherwise, bottled water isn’t any more “pure” than the stuff that comes from your tap.

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The reasons for this vary, but one of the major ones is that the FDA (which regulates bottled water) is nowhere near as powerful as the EPA, which regulates our tap water.

A 1999 study brings this difference to light. They tested over 1,000 bottles of water, sourced from 103 completely different brands. While the water was safe to drink for the most part, they found that at least some samples they tested contained contaminants that exceeded state standards. These contaminants ranged from those of the bacterial variety, to carcinogens and various kinds of toxic chemicals — all of which would normally not be permitted under normal EPA standards.

If you’re thinking, “Well, that study was done in 1999 so it’s probably out of date,” you’d unfortunately be incorrect. Since that time, the regulations that guide the bottled water industry have not changed.

The bottom line? Your tap water is more than likely just as pure (if not more pure) than any of the bottled water you can purchase in the market. Filtering it yourself only makes it that much better.

4. Bottled water companies aren’t being honest with you.

If a company isn’t telling you the truth, do you feel inclined to give them your hard-earned money? I would bet your answer is no.

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Many bottled water brands advertise their product as being sourced from natural springs or other theoretically pure sources. The truth is; however, that up to 45% of bottled water is sourced from the exact same places that your tap water comes from. These corporations try to hide that fact in order to drive sales.

Brands like Aquafina and Dasani are the worst offenders when it comes to using municipal water sources. This is the same exact stuff you can get from your faucet.

Even worse than their use of municipal sources is the fact that bottled water companies get the majority of their water from the drought-stricken state of California. Which is disturbing, since bottling plants require 1.63 liters of water for every 1 liter placed in an actual bottle. In other words, creating one bottle of water wastes nearly two bottles of water in the process. Not very sustainable.

Therefore, if you are buying bottled water, it’s likely that it comes from a municipal source. Probably one that exists in California. That’s reason enough in my book to stay away. (Being from California, I literally haven’t seen more than a couple drops of rain in the past five years.)

5. Buying bottled water sets a bad example.

Consider for a moment that we live in a world where ~750 million people have little to no access to clean drinking water. What would they think of us if they knew we wasted a precious resource like water by placing it into bottles, when we could just as easily get it from our faucets and refrigerators? We forget the absolute luxury of running water.

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Given everything else stated in this article, it would seem ludicrous to them that we’ve managed to perpetuate such a strange and backwards industry.

Finally, I’ll end with this: the human race spends collectively around $100 billion dollars a year on bottled water. The United Nations estimates that just 1/6th of that amount of money would be enough to “cut in half the number of people without access to clean water.”

So let’s be thankful for our taps! Instead of spending our money on the bottled stuff, let’s send it to those who really need it.

Where to go from here…

As I stated in one of my previous articles, your best best is to buy a nice re-usable water bottle, and re-fill it with tap water (or filtered tap water, whichever is your preference). You now know that your tap water is just as clean (if not cleaner) than the H2O in your favorite bottled brand. Additionally, you know that it will cost you a lot less in the long run to use your tap as opposed to purchasing pre-packaged water. With that in mind, you really have nothing to lose!

Rewinding back to the question I asked in the introduction: what is your opinion of bottled water now? Will you still buy it on a regular basis? Sound off in the comments section below.

Featured photo credit: sparkling water/susanne nilsson via flic.kr

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Last Updated on September 18, 2020

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

Learning how to get in shape and set goals is important if you’re looking to live a healthier lifestyle and get closer to your goal weight. While this does require changes to your daily routine, you’ll find that you are able to look and feel better in only two weeks.

Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get in shape. Although anyone can cover the basics (eat right and exercise), there are some things that I could only learn through trial and error. Let’s cover some of the most important points for how to get in shape in two weeks.

1. Exercise Daily

It is far easier to make exercise a habit if it is a daily one. If you aren’t exercising at all, I recommend starting by exercising a half hour every day. When you only exercise a couple times per week, it is much easier to turn one day off into three days off, a week off, or a month off.

If you are already used to exercising, switching to three or four times a week to fit your schedule may be preferable, but it is a lot harder to maintain a workout program you don’t do every day.

Be careful to not repeat the same exercise routine each day. If you do an intense ab workout one day, try switching it up to general cardio the next. You can also squeeze in a day of light walking to break up the intensity.

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If you’re a morning person, check out these morning exercises that will start your day off right.

2. Duration Doesn’t Substitute for Intensity

Once you get into the habit of regular exercise, where do you go if you still aren’t reaching your goals? Most people will solve the problem by exercising for longer periods of time, turning forty-minute workouts into two hour stretches. Not only does this drain your time, but it doesn’t work particularly well.

One study shows that “exercising for a whole hour instead of a half does not provide any additional loss in either body weight or fat”[1].

This is great news for both your schedule and your levels of motivation. You’ll likely find it much easier to exercise for 30 minutes a day instead of an hour. In those 30 minutes, do your best to up the intensity to your appropriate edge to get the most out of the time.

3. Acknowledge Your Limits

Many people get frustrated when they plateau in their weight loss or muscle gaining goals as they’re learning how to get in shape. Everyone has an equilibrium and genetic set point where their body wants to remain. This doesn’t mean that you can’t achieve your fitness goals, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you are struggling to lose weight or put on muscle.

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Acknowledging a set point doesn’t mean giving up, but it does mean realizing the obstacles you face.

Expect to hit a plateau in your own fitness results[2]. When you expect a plateau, you can manage around it so you can continue your progress at a more realistic rate. When expectations meet reality, you can avoid dietary crashes.

4. Eat Healthy, Not Just Food That Looks Healthy

Know what you eat. Don’t fuss over minutia like whether you’re getting enough Omega 3’s or tryptophan, but be aware of the big things. Look at the foods you eat regularly and figure out whether they are healthy or not. Don’t get fooled by the deceptively healthy snacks just pretending to be good for you.

The basic nutritional advice includes:

  • Eat unprocessed foods
  • Eat more veggies
  • Use meat as a side dish, not a main course
  • Eat whole grains, not refined grains[3]

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Eat whole grains when you want to learn how to get in shape.

    5. Watch Out for Travel

    Don’t let a four-day holiday interfere with your attempts when you’re learning how to get in shape. I don’t mean that you need to follow your diet and exercise plan without any excursion, but when you are in the first few weeks, still forming habits, be careful that a week long break doesn’t terminate your progress.

    This is also true of schedule changes that leave you suddenly busy or make it difficult to exercise. Have a backup plan so you can be consistent, at least for the first month when you are forming habits.

    If travel is on your schedule and can’t be avoided, make an exercise plan before you go[4], and make sure to pack exercise clothes and an exercise mat as motivation to keep you on track.

    6. Start Slow

    Ever start an exercise plan by running ten miles and then puking your guts out? Maybe you aren’t that extreme, but burnout is common early on when learning how to get in shape. You have a lifetime to be healthy, so don’t try to go from couch potato to athletic superstar in a week.

    If you are starting a running regime, for example, run less than you can to start. Starting strength training? Work with less weight than you could theoretically lift. Increasing intensity and pushing yourself can come later when your body becomes comfortable with regular exercise.

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    7. Be Careful When Choosing a Workout Partner

    Should you have a workout partner? That depends. Workout partners can help you stay motivated and make exercising more fun. But they can also stop you from reaching your goals.

    My suggestion would be to have a workout partner, but when you start to plateau (either in physical ability, weight loss/gain, or overall health) and you haven’t reached your goals, consider mixing things up a bit.

    If you plateau, you may need to make changes to continue improving. In this case it’s important to talk to your workout partner about the changes you want to make, and if they don’t seem motivated to continue, offer a thirty day break where you both try different activities.

    I notice that guys working out together tend to match strength after a brief adjustment phase. Even if both are trying to improve, something seems to stall improvement once they reach a certain point. I found that I was able to lift as much as 30-50% more after taking a short break from my regular workout partner.

    Final Thoughts

    Learning how to get in shape in as little as two weeks sounds daunting, but if you’re motivated and have the time and energy to devote to it, it’s certainly possible.

    Find an exercise routine that works for you, eat healthy, drink lots of water, and watch as the transformation begins.

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    Featured photo credit: Alexander Redl via unsplash.com

    Reference

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