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Seven Leadership Mistakes That Deplete The Energy Of Teams

Seven Leadership Mistakes That Deplete The Energy Of Teams

Over the last six months I have had the opportunity to sit down personally with a number of respected CEO’s and CMO’s to discuss their individual approach to successful leadership.

What has been common throughout the conversations is a consistent message of the absolute necessity to be aware of the impact that the energy of a leader can have on organisational energy. It led me to reflect on my own leadership mistakes and those I have observed throughout my career. I share these with you below with some ideas to get back on track as soon as you sense a little familiarity.

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1. Forgetting to fuel your own energy levels first.

Being the boss is a tough gig. It’s not unusual to find that this means putting yourself last. And while well intended it can leave you drained. Energy is contagious, both in the positive and negative sense. So, if you aren’t energized or able to manage your energy well, how can you expect to lead with energy? Tony Schwartz talks about the importance of managing your energy, not your time and ensuring that our four energy systems – the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual are each looked after in their own way.

2. Not setting a team vision.

This is the difference between inspiration and motivation. Motivating people is exhausting. Inspire your team behind a goal that is bigger than the individual, clearly define success and you will unleash energy in your team you never knew existed. And, without any additional energy required from you. Once the goal is set, let your team take responsibility for how it is achieved and get out of the way.

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3. Being inconsistent.

As a leader it is your job to be aware of your energy levels and create a consistent experience of your leadership. Extreme highs and lows in energy will leave a lasting impact on your team. If you are experiencing either, and you are unable to control it, remove yourself from the situation until you can.

4. Not scheduling recovery time.

The impact of corporate burnout can be wide ranging and destructive. Everyone needs to recharge their batteries. Role model down time and insist your team schedule it for themselves too. A depleted team member can impact the energy of the whole team, so make the call and give them permission to take the day off rather than affect everyone. Remember to be consistent about this too.

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5. Conflict between individual contribution and team KPIs.

It is important to make sure your team are rewarded for directing their energy in the right direction. Common sense right? That is until you add the normal complexity that exists in traditional organisations and suddenly you find you have conflicting and often competitive goals. Check that your performance incentives are actually driving the right behaviors. And if your team is working with another team adopt shared goals to create a bigger impact together.

6. Forgetting about the small moments.

Creating the big rah rah of a team workshop is great. Until you walk in the next day and don’t say ‘Hello’ or chose to send an email to a person meters away from you destroying all the great energy you built up. Get up off your ass and have a proper chat, every single day. Or FaceTime is good too.

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7. Try to fix and manage people vs enabling and leading them.

It is not a true leadership responsibility to fix people. It’s the old adage that you can impart all the knowledge in the world to someone, but if they don’t want to change, they won’t. Enable them with tools, knowledge, experience and they’ll take responsibility themselves. Read more on this here.

While the mistakes above are common, with small changes they are also easy to overcome. Regularly checking in with yourself and your team to make sure that bad habits aren’t allowed to creep in is the first step to becoming an energized leader.

Featured photo credit: Jeff Sturges via imcreator.com

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Last Updated on November 19, 2018

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

I went through a personal experience that acted as a catalyst for an epiphany. When I got fired from a job, I learned something important about myself and where I was headed with my freelance career. I realized that the most important aspect of that one rather small job was the influence of the company owner. I realized that I wasn’t hurt that the company and I weren’t a perfect match; I was devastated by the stark fact that I needed a mentor and I had almost found one but lost her.

Suddenly, I felt like J.D., the main character in “Scrubs,” chasing Dr. Cox and trying to rip insight and wisdom from someone I respect. The realization that a recognized thought-leader and experienced entrepreneur severed ties with me felt crushing. But, I picked myself back up and thought about five ways to acquire a mentor without having the awkwardness of outright asking.

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1. Remember, a professional mentorship must be mutual.

A professional mentor must agree to engage in a mutual relationship because, as the comedy T.V. series showed us, one simply cannot force someone to tutor us. We have to prove that we are worth the time investment through persistence and dedication to the craft.

2. You have to have common interests with your mentor.

Even if a professional mentor appears at your job or school, realize that unless you and this person have common interests, you won’t find the relationship successful. I’ve been in situations where someone I respected had vastly different ideas about what was important in life or what one should spend his or her free time doing. If these things don’t line up, you may find the relationship won’t be as fruitful, even when the mentor knows a great deal about one industry.

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3. Thought-leaders will respect your passion.

One of the ways you can prove yourself worthy to a professional mentor is through your passion and your dedication. No one wants to spend time grooming and teaching another who will not take advice or put the effort in to improve. When following thought-leaders on Twitter and trying to engage with higher-ups in a work setting, realize that your actions most often speak louder than your words.

4. Before worrying if he respects you, ask if you respect him.

On the other side of the coin, you should seriously reflect on those common interests and make sure you respect your professional mentor. Just because someone holds a title, degree or office does not mean that person is trustworthy or honest. Don’t be swayed by appearances and take the time to find a suitable professional mentor.

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5. Failure is often the best way to learn

I honestly have made more mistakes than I can count. I know I’ve learned a great deal from poorly organized businesses and my own poor choices. The most important quality I’ve developed is an ability to swallow my pride and learn from my mistakes. If life knocks me down nine times, I get back up 10 times. One of the songs Megadeth wrote, “Of Mice and Men,” resonates in my mind when I pull myself up by my bootstraps and try again for a goal I’ve set: “So live your life and live it well. There’s not much left of me to tell. I just got back up each time I fell.” Hopefully, this brief post can act as a professional mentor to you in your quest to find not only a brave leader but also a trusted adviser.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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