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6 Nutrition Books That Will Transform Your Health

6 Nutrition Books That Will Transform Your Health

Nutrition books are a dime a dozen and most of them are just no good. But, if you’re serious about getting a handle on your health and wellness, which really is the single-most important area of your life, then these are the books you’ll want to read.

Note that these nutrition books do not contain any “secrets” to “fast fat loss,” nor are any of them about “how to lose weight quickly.” Such magic bullets simple do not exist. The nutrition books outlined in this article are science-backed and research-driven. This should give you piece of mind that the advice from these books has been tried and tested for maximum effectiveness. So let’s dig in, shall we?

1. Why We Get Fat by Gary Taubes

Why We Get Fat- And What to Do About It by Gary Taubes book cover

    Why are some people thin and others fat? What roles do exercise and genetics play in our weight? What foods should we eat, and what foods should we avoid? These are the answers you’ll learn about in this research-driven book about the reality of diet and exercise in the modern world.

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    Get the book here

    2. Brain Maker by David Perlmutter and Kristin Loberg

    brain-games-book-cover

      Did you know that 80 per cent of your immune system is comprised of your gut? Yep. This nutrition book is packed with recently uncovered science (like the bit mentioned above) regarding the impact gut bacteria has on our health.

      Get the book here

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      3. The China Study by Thomas Campbell

      the-china-study

        If you’re interested in learning from the single-most comprehensive book about nutrition conducted to date, then this is the book you need to read. The research behind this book, and its health and weight-loss implications, will do more than expand your mind, it’ll downright surprise you (and maybe even scare you) into embracing a healthier way of life.

        Get the book here

        4. Wheat Belly by William David, MD

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        wheat_belly_book-cover

          After watching over 2,000 of his own patients dramatically transform their health after dropping wheat from their daily diets, William Davis decided to write Wheat Belly, a nutrition book filled with compelling evidence about why wheat — not fat — is among the primary contributors to America’s obesity epidemic.

          Get the book here

          5. Grain Brain by David Perlmutter and Kristin Loberg

          grain_brain_book_cover_david_perlmutter

            This book outlines the surprising truth about how wheat, carbs, and sugar act as the brain’s silent killers. The authors argue that these foods can cause significant nutrition problems — like gut-related issues, lack of creativity, and extreme fatigue.

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            Get the book here

            6. The Blue Zones Solution by Dan Buettner

            the_blue_zones_solution_book_cover

              What makes the healthiest people in the world so healthy? That’s what you’ll learn about in this fascinating nutrition book that outlines how the healthiest people in the world lead their lives — from what they eat to how they sleep, and everything in between.

              Get the book here

              Nutrition books galore

              Now that you’ve got this list of nutrition books, there’s only one question left… Which one do you read first? Should you go out and get all of them immediately? Should you read them all at once? Or should you take a lifetime to read them? Ultimately, it’s totally your decision what you do with this list and how you apply it to your life and career. But if I may, here’s what I would suggest you consider as you get started:

              • Subscribe to a book summary site like FlashBooks to get the key-takeaways from the books on this list.
              • If you’d prefer to read an entire book, I would highly suggest that you read just one book at a time. Sometimes, when we see something new and exciting, we have tendency to want to do/learn/read it all at once… and as we all know, this is nearly impossible to do without stressing ourselves out. So, choose a book and then commit to reading it from start to finish.

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              Dean Bokhari

              Author, Entrepreneur, Podcast & TV Host

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              Last Updated on November 15, 2019

              10 Real Reasons Why Breaking Bad Habits Is So Difficult

              10 Real Reasons Why Breaking Bad Habits Is So Difficult

              Bad habits expose us to suffering that is entirely avoidable. Unfortunately, these bad habits are difficult to break because they are 100% dependent on our mental and emotional state.

              Anything we do that can prove harmful to us is a bad habit – drinking, drugs, smoking, procrastination, poor communication are all examples of bad habits. These habits have negative effects on our physical, mental and emotional health.

              Humans are hardwired to respond to stimuli and to expect a consequence of any action. This is how habits are acquired: the brain expects to be rewarded a certain way under certain circumstances. How you initially responded to certain stimuli is how your brain will always remind you to behave when the same stimuli are experienced.

              If you visited the bar close to your office with colleagues every Friday, your brain will learn to send you a signal to stop there even when you are alone and eventually not just on Fridays. It will expect the reward of a drink after work every day, which can potentially lead to a drinking problem.

              Kicking negative behavior patterns and steering clear of them requires a lot of willpower and there are many reasons why breaking bad habits is so difficult.

              1. Lack of Awareness or Acceptance

              Breaking a bad habit is not possible if the person who has it is not aware that it is a bad one.

              Many people will not realize that their communication skills are poor or that their procrastination is affecting them negatively, or even that the drink they had as a nightcap has now increased to three.

              Awareness brings acceptance. Unless a person realizes on their own that a habit is bad, or someone manages to convince them of the same, there is very little chance of the habit being kicked.

              2. No Motivation

              Going through a divorce, not being able to cope with academics and falling into debt are instances that can bring a profound sense of failure with them. A person going through these times can fall into a cycle of negative thinking where the world is against them and nothing they can do will ever help, so they stop trying altogether.

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              This give-up attitude is a bad habit that just keeps coming around. Being in debt could make you feel like you are failing at maintaining your home, family and life in general.

              If you are looking to get out of a rut and feel motivated, take a look at this article: Why Is Internal Motivation So Powerful (And How to Find It)

              3. Underlying Psychological Conditions

              Psychological conditions such as depression and ADD can make it difficult to break bad habits.

              A depressed person may find it difficult to summon the energy to cook a healthy meal, resulting in food being ordered in or consumption of packaged foods. This could lead to eventually become a habit that adversely affects health and is difficult to overcome.

              A person with ADD may start to clean their house but get distracted soon after, leaving the task incomplete, eventually leading to a state where it is acceptable to live in a house that is untidy and dirty.

              The fear of missing out (FOMO) is very real to some people. Obsessively checking their social media and news sources, they may believe that not knowing of something as soon as it is published can be catastrophic to their social standing.

              4. Bad Habits Make Us Feel Good

              One of the reasons it is difficult to break habits is that a lot of them make us feel good.[1]

              We’ve all been there – the craving for a tub of ice cream after a breakup or a casual drag on a joint, never to be repeated until we miss how good it made us feel. We succumb to the craving for the pleasure felt while indulging in it, cementing it as a habit even while we are aware it isn’t good for us.

              Over-eating is a very common bad habit. Just another pack of crisps, a couple of candies, a large soda… none of these are needed by us. We want them because they give us comfort. They’re familiar, they taste good and we don’t even notice when we progress from just one extra slice of pizza to four.

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              You can read this article to learn more: We Do What We Know Is Bad for Us, Why?

              5. Upward Comparisons

              Comparisons are a bad habit that many of us have been exposed to since we were children. Parents might have compared us to siblings, teachers may have compared us to classmates, and bosses could compare us to past and present employees.

              The people who have developed the bad habit of comparing themselves to others have been given incorrect yardsticks for measurement from the start.

              These people will always find it difficult to break out of this bad habit because there will always be someone who has it better than they do: a better house, better car, better job, higher income and so on.

              6. No Alternative

              This is a real and valid reason why bad habits are hard to break. These habits could fulfill a need that may not be met any other way.

              Someone who has physical or psychological limitations such as a disability or social anxiety may find it hard to quit obsessive content consumption for better habits.

              Alternately, a perfectly healthy person may be unable to quit smoking because alternates are just not working out.

              Similarly, a person who bites their nails when anxious may be unable to relieve stress in any other socially accepted manner.

              7. Stress

              As mentioned above, anything that stresses us out can lead to adopting and cementing bad habits.

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              When a person is stressed about something, it is easy to give in to a bad habit because the mental resources required to fight them are not available.

              Stress plays such a huge role in this that we commonly find a person who had previously managed to kick a bad habit fall back into the old ways because they felt their stress couldn’t be managed any other way.

              8. Sense of Failure

              People looking to kick bad habits may feel a strong sense of failure because it’s just that difficult.

              Dropping a bad habit usually means changes in lifestyle that people may be unwilling to make, or these changes might not be easy to make in spite of the will to make them.

              Over-eaters need to empty their house of unhealthy food, resist the urge to order in and not pick up their standard grocery items from the store.

              Those who drink too much need to avoid the bars or even people who drink often.

              If such people slip even once with a glass of wine or a smoke or a bag of chips, they tend to be excessively harsh on themselves and feel like failures.

              9. The Need to Be All-New

              People who are looking to break bad habits feel they need to re-create themselves in order to break themselves of their bad habits, while the truth is the complete opposite.

              These people actually need to go back to who they were before they developed the bad habit.

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              10. Force of Habit

              Humans are creatures of habit and having familiar, comforting outcomes for daily triggers helps us maintain a sense of balance in our lives.

              Consider people who are used to lighting up a cigarette every time they talk on the phone or munching on crisps when watching TV. They will always associate a phone call with a puff on the cigarette and screen time with eating.

              These habits, though bad, are a source of comfort to them as is meeting with those people they indulge in these bad habits with.

              Final Thoughts

              These are the main reasons why bad habits may be difficult to break but it is important to remember that the task is not impossible.

              Do you have bad habits you want to kick? My article How to Break a Bad Habit (and Replace It With a Good One) gives you tips on well, how to kick bad habits while my other article How Long Does It Take to Break a Habit? Science Will Tell You gives realistic information on what to expect while you’re trying to quit them.

              There are many compassionate, positive and self-loving techniques to kick bad habits. The internet is rich in information regarding bad habits, their effects and how to overcome them, while professional help is always available for those who feel they need it.

              Featured photo credit: NORTHFOLK via unsplash.com

              Reference

              [1] After Skool: Why Do Bad Habits Feel SO GOOD?

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