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15 Self Help Books To Make You Live A Greater Life

15 Self Help Books To Make You Live A Greater Life

“A good book is an education of the heart. It enlarges your sense of human possibility what human nature is of what happens in the world. It’s a creator of inwardness.” Susan Sontag

To embark on a journey to live a great life is a courageous and life long journey. It is very difficult to do it alone and if you don’t have help, the chances of you reaching your goal to live a great life is virtually impossible.

Self Help books are the best way for you to get the knowledge, information, tools and strategies to guide and support you to achieving your goal to live a great life.

These 15 Self Help Books have changed millions of peoples lives and they can help you change your life too, so that you can live the life you desire.

1. Awaken The Giant Within – Anthony Robbins

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Anthony Robbins

    “in life, lots of people know what to do, but few people actually do what they know.” Anthony Robbins

    This book is the “bible for personal development”. The main message from the book is, that we have the power right now to control how we think, how we feel, and what we do. Anything we want or desire in our life, we have the power to achieve it.

    You hold within you the power and the energy force to achieve all of your dreams – hence the title of the book “Awaken the Giant Within”.

    2. Finding Your Own North Star – Martha Beck

    ““No one but you has the ability to find your own North Star and no one but you has the power to keep you from finding it. No one”

    Martha Beck

    North Star

      Your North Star is about you finding your passion and purpose in life. The tools and strategies are practical and uncomplicated. Martha Beck takes you through some very simple and effective processes  that will give you clarity and a better understanding of how to deal with internal conflict, internal dialogue and the feelings of unhappiness, discontent and dissatisfaction in your life.

      3. Mojo: How To Get It How To Keep It How To Get It Back If You Lose It – Marshall Goldsmith

      “Mojo” is, “That positive spirit toward what we are doing now, that starts from the inside and radiates to the outside”  Marshall Goldsmith

      Mojo

        I found my MOJO when I read this book. Marshall Goldsmith, for me, did exactly what the title says – he guided me through practical steps and provided me with tools and strategies that helped me get my mojo back.

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        Marshall Goldsmith defines Mojo as “the moment when we do something that’s purposeful, powerful and positive and rest of the world recognises it”.  A must read book that will change your life as it did mine.

        4. What Should I Do With My Life? – Po Bronson

        “I learned that it was in hard times that people usually changed the course of their life; in good times, they frequently only talked about change. Hard times forced them to overcome the doubts that normally gave them pause.It surprised me how often we hold ourselves back until we have no choice.”  Po Bronson

        Po Bronson

          This book is not going to give you the five steps to finding your Life Purpose or to living a greater life. It does not give you any tools or strategies to help you answer all those questions about life that are swirling around in your head.

          This book will provide you with a reality check as to how tough and complicated it can be when you decide to change your career and your life. It is an inspirational book as it is based on the true stories of ordinary people who made a decision and took action to answer the question “what should I do with my life?” There are no famous peoples’ stories in this book,  just ordinary people doing extraordinary things.

          5. The Magic of Thinking Big: Dr David J Schwartz PhD

          “Think you are weak, think you lack what it takes, think you will lose, think you are second class – think this way and you are doomed to mediocrity.”  Dr David J Schwartz

          Magic of Thinking BIg

            This book is an oldie and a classic. According to Dr Schwartz, to create change in your life and to attain all that you desire the key thing you need to do is, change your thinking and your attitude.

            The other key message from this book is, you must start preparing your mind and your thinking for the journey of personal change. If you are going to run a marathon, you need to train and get your body in shape. This is the same concept for taking on the challenge of personal change. If you want to chase your dreams you need to train your mind to dream big.

            6. The Art of Happiness A Handbook For Living – Dalai Lama

            “happiness is determined more by one’s state of mind than by external events.” Dalai Lama

            Dalai Lama

              There is not a person I know who is not in the pursuit of happiness. The Art of Happiness is a book that does not give you the answers you seek as to how you can live a happy and prosperous life. What the book does however do, is it introduces you to Buddhist teachings and the wisdom of the Dalai Lama, who lives a life that is content, happy, and spiritually fulfilled. There is no better way to learn about how to get happiness and fulfilment than from someone who is actually practising what they teach.

              The Art of Happiness is a book that will encourage you to self reflect and to look deeper into your inner self (your soul) so that you can truly clarify what happiness really means to you.

               7.   The Gifts of Imperfection Brené – Brown

              “Healthy striving is self-focused: How can I improve? Perfectionism is other-focused: What will they think? Perfectionism is a hustle.”

              Brené Brown

              Gift of Imperfection

                Renee Brown’s Book the Gift of Imperfection will show you how to find your courage, rediscover your self-belief and self worth.  For without these key essentials you wont be able to have a greater life. The Gift of Imperfection is about the lifelong journey.

                This book takes you from the place where you are asking the question: “What will people think?” to the place where you are making the statement “I am enough”.

                8. Learned Optimism: How to Change Your Mind and Your Life – Martin Seligman PhD 

                “Habits of thinking need not be forever. One of the most significant findings in psychology in the last twenty years is that individuals can choose the way they think.”  Martin Seligman

                Martin Seligman

                  Dr Martin Seligman is Dr Happiness! He is an expert on how one can live a happy and fulfilled life. In his book Martin Seligman talks about the power of being an optimist and uses scientific reasons as to why you should be living an Optimistic Life.

                  Seligman believes that Optimism and Pessimism are habits of thinking and these habits of thinking have been learned through out our lives. We just need to learn how to change these habits of thinking so that we can live happier more fulfilled lives. There is hope for you, if you have a pessimistic view of life, as Dr Seligman will teach you how to be an Optimist.

                  9. If Life Is A Game These Are Rules – Cherie Carter Scott

                  “Remind yourself often that self-esteem is ephemeral. You will have it, lose it, cultivate it, nurture it, and be forced to rebuild it over and over again.”  Cherie Carter Scott

                  .

                  If Life is Game there are Rules

                    Have you ever wondered what the heck is going on in your life or asked the question “ why does this happen to me?” If so, then you need to read this book by Cherie Carter Scott. Cherie Carter Scott presents a set of life rules that she calls “The 10 Rules of Being Human’.  This book is a reality check about how you should be living your life.  After you have read this book you will gain more clarity about  you, how to move in forward in your life and how play the game of life, which of course will result in you living a great life.

                    9. Seven Habits of Highly Effective People – Steven R. Covey

                    “Habit is the intersection of knowledge (what to do), skill (how to do), and desire (want to do).” Stephen R.Covey

                    The_7_Habits_of_Highly_Effective_People

                      “Each of us guard a gate of change that can only be opened from the inside.”  Stephen R Covey

                      Have you ever wondered why it is that some people are very good at getting things done?  Do you go looking for excuses to be distracted rather than sit down and get those essential tasks completed? The road to living a great life takes a lot of effort, commitment and focus. Distraction and procrastination will not get you a life you love.

                      Stephen Covey will show you how to become more effective at completing those essential tasks that can change your life. The 7 Habits are the winning strategies you should implement in your life so that you can live the life you desire.

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                      10. The Four Agreements – Don Miguel Ruiz

                      “Every human is an artist. The dream of your life is to make beautiful art.”  Don Miguel Ruiz

                      Four  Agreements

                        Seeking the advice and knowledge of others, particularly those who had been on similar journeys. is essential to you staying strong and committed to living a great life.

                        Don Miguel Ruiz is one person I sought out – his depth of wisdom, his spirituality and knowledge about life is insightful and inspiring. The Four Agreements are Don Miguel’s code for life. The Four Agreements provide an inspirational code for life, for the way you handle your relationships, how you behave and how you communicate with others.

                        If you are seeking inspiration and knowledge to find your courage to follow your dreams – then read The Four Agreements. You will discover four life principles that will definitely help you reach your dreams and aspirations in life.

                        11. Switch How To Change Things When Change Is Hard – Chip Heath & Dan Heath

                        “So the question is this: How can you make your changes a matter of identity rather than a matter of consequences?” Chip & Dan Heath

                        Switch

                          To live a great life you have to make changes and they are big changes. If I had to recommend one book that showed you how to create and maintain lasting change in your life  – then it would be Switch.

                          The best way to create and sustain the change in your life according to the authors is when you:

                          Direct The Rider – by providing rules to follow, precise actions with small measurable goals

                          Motivate The Elephant – identify the motivation to change or an emotional rationale for change

                          Shape the Path – set the direction and shape the path to facilitate the journey of change

                          When you get these 3 elements aligned then creating and sustaining the change in your life is pretty much guaranteed,

                          12. The Success Principles: How to Get From Where You Are To Where You Want To Be – Jack Canfield

                          “You only have control over three things in your life—the thoughts you think, the images you visualize, and the actions you take (your behaviour).”  Jack Canfield

                          Jack 2

                            This book offers practical advice on how to change those attitudes and beliefs that are preventing you from achieving your success in life. It shows you how to harness the resources you have within you and around you so that you can achieve any of the goals you set.

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                            13. Life Was Never Meant To Be A Struggle – Stuart Wilde

                            “You’re the only one who can decide what’s best for you.” Stuart Wilde

                            Life was

                              Stuart Wilde believes that the struggles in life are “laced with emotion and desperation” and we were born to be free. To achieve that freedom we have to move from struggle to free FLOW.

                              This book will help you to identify the cause of struggle in your life and shows you how to eliminate it quickly through a concerted action plan so you can achieve flow in your life.

                              14. The Power of Now – Eckhart Tolle

                              “Realize deeply that the present moment is all you have. Make the NOW the primary focus of your life”. Eckhart Tolle

                              power of now

                                “See if you can give more attention to the doing than to the results that you want to achieve through it. Give your fullest attention to whatever the moment presents” Eckhart Tolle

                                The Power of Now I call the 101 guide to spiritual growth and enlightenment.  This book has great tools and strategies for those of you who are interested in; mindfulness, awareness and the quest to achieving living a life you love in the now!

                                15. Think and Grow Rich – Napoleon Hill

                                “You are the master of your destiny. You can influence, direct and control your own environment. You can make your life what you want it to be.”  Napoleon Hill

                                thinkandgrowrich-21-219x300

                                  Napoleon Hill wrote Think and Grow Rich to help people overcome the physiological barriers that kept them from wealth.

                                  According to Napoleon Hill money brings us stability, which brings relief to our life, which results in us feeling a sense of satisfaction and when we feel satisfied we have a sense of belonging –this does make us happy. When we are happy we are living a great life.

                                  Napoleon Hill believes that key requirements to create wealth in your life are; self-belief, self-awareness, the motivation to succeed, direction, focus and a positive healthy relationship with money.

                                  Reading these 15 Self Help books will not give you the one and only ultimate answer you may seek as to how you can make a great life. They will, however give you advise, wisdom, knowledge, and the tools and strategies that will support and guide you on your journey to living a great life.

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                                  Kathryn Sandford

                                  Career Resilience Coach passionate about supporting others to grow and thrive in a complex world.

                                  7 Ways to Overcome Your Fear of the Unknown And Get More Out of Life What Is the Purpose of Life and What Should You Live For? 10 Things You Can Do Now to Change Your Life Forever If You Don’t Know What to Do with Your Life, Read These 5 Strategies How to Stop Being Sad and Start Feeling Happy

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                                  Last Updated on July 17, 2019

                                  The Science of Setting Goals (And How It Affects Your Brain)

                                  The Science of Setting Goals (And How It Affects Your Brain)

                                  What happens in our heads when we set goals?

                                  Apparently a lot more than you’d think.

                                  Goal setting isn’t quite so simple as deciding on the things you’d like to accomplish and working towards them.

                                  According to the research of psychologists, neurologists, and other scientists, setting a goal invests ourselves into the target as if we’d already accomplished it. That is, by setting something as a goal, however small or large, however near or far in the future, a part of our brain believes that desired outcome is an essential part of who we are – setting up the conditions that drive us to work towards the goals to fulfill the brain’s self-image.

                                  Apparently, the brain cannot distinguish between things we want and things we have. Neurologically, then, our brains treat the failure to achieve our goal the same way as it treats the loss of a valued possession. And up until the moment, the goal is achieved, we have failed to achieve it, setting up a constant tension that the brain seeks to resolve.

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                                  Ideally, this tension is resolved by driving us towards accomplishment. In many cases, though, the brain simply responds to the loss, causing us to feel fear, anxiety, even anguish, depending on the value of the as-yet-unattained goal.

                                  Love, Loss, Dopamine, and Our Dreams

                                  The brains functions are carried out by a stew of chemicals called neurotransmitters. You’ve probably heard of serotonin, which plays a key role in our emotional life – most of the effective anti-depressant medications on the market are serotonin reuptake inhibitors, meaning they regulate serotonin levels in the brain leading to more stable moods.

                                  Somewhat less well-known is another neurotransmitter, dopamine. Among other things, dopamine acts as a motivator, creating a sensation of pleasure when the brain is stimulated by achievement. Dopamine is also involved in maintaining attention – some forms of ADHD are linked to irregular responses to dopamine.[1]

                                  So dopamine plays a key role in keeping us focused on our goals and motivating us to attain them, rewarding our attention and achievement by elevating our mood. That is, we feel good when we work towards our goals.

                                  Dopamine is related to wanting – to desire. The attainment of the object of our desire releases dopamine into our brains and we feel good. Conversely, the frustration of our desires starves us of dopamine, causing anxiety and fear.

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                                  One of the greatest desires is romantic love – the long-lasting, “till death do us part” kind. It’s no surprise, then, that romantic love is sustained, at least in part, through the constant flow of dopamine released in the presence – real or imagined – of our true love. Loss of romantic love cuts off that supply of dopamine, which is why it feels like you’re dying – your brain responds by triggering all sorts of anxiety-related responses.

                                  Herein lies obsession, as we go to ever-increasing lengths in search of that dopamine reward. Stalking specialists warn against any kind of contact with a stalker, positive or negative, because any response at all triggers that reward mechanism. If you let the phone ring 50 times and finally pick up on the 51st ring to tell your stalker off, your stalker gets his or her reward, and learns that all s/he has to do is wait for the phone to ring 51 times.

                                  Romantic love isn’t the only kind of desire that can create this kind of dopamine addiction, though – as Captain Ahab (from Moby Dick) knew well, any suitably important goal can become an obsession once the mind has established ownership.

                                  The Neurology of Ownership

                                  Ownership turns out to be about a lot more than just legal rights. When we own something, we invest a part of ourselves into it – it becomes an extension of ourselves.

                                  In a famous experiment at Cornell University, researchers gave students school logo coffee mugs, and then offered to trade them chocolate bars for the mugs. Very few were willing to make the trade, no matter how much they professed to like chocolate. Big deal, right? Maybe they just really liked those mugs![2]

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                                  But when they reversed the experiment, handing out chocolate and then offering to trade mugs for the candy, they found that now, few students were all that interested in the mugs. Apparently the key thing about the mugs or the chocolate wasn’t whether students valued whatever they had in their possession, but simply that they had it in their possession.

                                  This phenomenon is called the “endowment effect”. In a nutshell, the endowment effect occurs when we take ownership of an object (or idea, or person); in becoming “ours” it becomes integrated with our sense of identity, making us reluctant to part with it (losing it is seen as a loss, which triggers that dopamine shut-off I discussed above).

                                  Interestingly, researchers have found that the endowment effect doesn’t require actual ownership or even possession to come into play. In fact, it’s enough to have a reasonable expectation of future possession for us to start thinking of something as a part of us – as jilted lovers, gambling losers, and 7-year olds denied a toy at the store have all experienced.

                                  The Upshot for Goal-Setters

                                  So what does all this mean for would-be achievers?

                                  On one hand, it’s a warning against setting unreasonable goals. The bigger the potential for positive growth a goal has, the more anxiety and stress your brain is going to create around it’s non-achievement.

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                                  It also suggests that the common wisdom to limit your goals to a small number of reasonable, attainable objectives is good advice. The more goals you have, the more ends your brain thinks it “owns” and therefore the more grief and fear the absence of those ends is going to cause you.

                                  On a more positive note, the fact that the brain rewards our attentiveness by releasing dopamine means that our brain is working with us to direct us to achievement. Paying attention to your goals feels good, encouraging us to spend more time doing it. This may be why outcome visualization — a favorite technique of self-help gurus involving imagining yourself having completed your objectives — has such a poor track record in clinical studies. It effectively tricks our brain into rewarding us for achieving our goals even though we haven’t done it yet!

                                  But ultimately, our brain wants us to achieve our goals, so that it’s a sense of who we are that can be fulfilled. And that’s pretty good news!

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                                  Featured photo credit: Alexa Williams via unsplash.com

                                  Reference

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