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Write A Killer Resume In Seven Easy Steps

Write A Killer Resume In Seven Easy Steps

If you are looking for a job then your resume (or CV) is the key document which will either get you an interview or put you on the reject pile.  Most recruitment agencies and most recruiting managers receive hundreds of resumes and they typically scan each one for 15 seconds or less so it is critical that your document gains attention and says the right things about you in the right way.

Your resume should be no longer than two pages.  The first page contains your summary, key skills and achievements.  The second page contains a brief career history and your highest educational achievement.  Here are seven key steps when constructing your resume.

1.  Summary Statement.

In terms of the job market what are you?  You need a short summary statement of one or two sentences which clearly articulates what you are.  Avoid long, generic, ‘motherhood’ claims which anyone could make e.g. ‘A highly motivated goal-oriented team-player with strong interpersonal skills and excellent communication abilities.’  These opinions of yourself are worthless because who would not say this?  Be specific e.g.  ‘A qualified project manager with a proven track record in delivering major projects on time and within budget.  I have particular experience in leading multinational teams to deliver Oracle and SAP implementation projects in financial and retail sectors.’

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2.  Key Skills

Give four or five bullet points of your most valuable transferable skills.  You need to choose these carefully and be as specific as possible,  Once again try to avoid motherhood and wherever possible list explicit expertise.  What are the skills you have acquired that employers are looking for?  What are the keywords that recruiters will put into search engines when looking for someone for the kind of position you desire?  Instead of saying ‘Strong IT skills’ list the particular programming languages or applications that you know best.

3. Achievements

Select a list of your three or four proudest achievements.  What results did you deliver for the organizations where you worked?  Do not be bashful. Blow your own trumpet with facts, figures and names of companies.  ‘As Sales Manager at XYZ I grew sales revenue from $12m to $19m in two years.’  ‘At ABC I lead the team which won Citibank as a major new account.’

4. Career History

The second page contains a brief summary of your most recent work experiences.  List the organizations, your job title, your key responsibilities and achievements.  Do not include long explanations for why you left one job to go to another or why you were laid off.  Keep it concise and factual.  In general it is only the last 10 to 15 years that are relevant so do not include a complete career history if it goes back further than this.  If you are older than 50 then do not indicate your age as some employers may be prejudiced against older candidates.

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5. Details

Add your highest educational achievement and any relevant professional qualifications.  You can add some personal interests and hobbies but keep them to a minimum.  Be sure to have your name, email and phone number clearly visible on the front page so that people can contact you easily.  You do not have to include your address but it might be helpful to mention the town where you are located.

6. Align your LinkedIn profile to your resume

Recruiters use both so they should be aligned.  Your LinkedIn profile contains more material e.g. recommendations but both this profile and your resume should clearly position you in the same way with the same key words for the search engines.

7. Personalize your covering letter

Whenever you apply for a position send a covering letter or email with your resume and tailor the letter to the exact wording and needs expressed in the advert.  Explain precisely and briefly why you are a good candidate for the position and how your skills and experience are relevant.

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Get several different people to review your resume.  Keep working at it so that every word counts.  Make it clear, short, well laid out and and easy to read.  Once you have your resume in good shape you should apply, apply, apply.  Good luck with your job hunting.

 

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Featured photo credit: krosseel via mrg.bz

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Paul Sloane

Professional Keynote Speaker, Author, Innovation Expert

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Last Updated on November 19, 2018

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

How to Find a Suitable Professional Mentor

I went through a personal experience that acted as a catalyst for an epiphany. When I got fired from a job, I learned something important about myself and where I was headed with my freelance career. I realized that the most important aspect of that one rather small job was the influence of the company owner. I realized that I wasn’t hurt that the company and I weren’t a perfect match; I was devastated by the stark fact that I needed a mentor and I had almost found one but lost her.

Suddenly, I felt like J.D., the main character in “Scrubs,” chasing Dr. Cox and trying to rip insight and wisdom from someone I respect. The realization that a recognized thought-leader and experienced entrepreneur severed ties with me felt crushing. But, I picked myself back up and thought about five ways to acquire a mentor without having the awkwardness of outright asking.

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1. Remember, a professional mentorship must be mutual.

A professional mentor must agree to engage in a mutual relationship because, as the comedy T.V. series showed us, one simply cannot force someone to tutor us. We have to prove that we are worth the time investment through persistence and dedication to the craft.

2. You have to have common interests with your mentor.

Even if a professional mentor appears at your job or school, realize that unless you and this person have common interests, you won’t find the relationship successful. I’ve been in situations where someone I respected had vastly different ideas about what was important in life or what one should spend his or her free time doing. If these things don’t line up, you may find the relationship won’t be as fruitful, even when the mentor knows a great deal about one industry.

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3. Thought-leaders will respect your passion.

One of the ways you can prove yourself worthy to a professional mentor is through your passion and your dedication. No one wants to spend time grooming and teaching another who will not take advice or put the effort in to improve. When following thought-leaders on Twitter and trying to engage with higher-ups in a work setting, realize that your actions most often speak louder than your words.

4. Before worrying if he respects you, ask if you respect him.

On the other side of the coin, you should seriously reflect on those common interests and make sure you respect your professional mentor. Just because someone holds a title, degree or office does not mean that person is trustworthy or honest. Don’t be swayed by appearances and take the time to find a suitable professional mentor.

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5. Failure is often the best way to learn

I honestly have made more mistakes than I can count. I know I’ve learned a great deal from poorly organized businesses and my own poor choices. The most important quality I’ve developed is an ability to swallow my pride and learn from my mistakes. If life knocks me down nine times, I get back up 10 times. One of the songs Megadeth wrote, “Of Mice and Men,” resonates in my mind when I pull myself up by my bootstraps and try again for a goal I’ve set: “So live your life and live it well. There’s not much left of me to tell. I just got back up each time I fell.” Hopefully, this brief post can act as a professional mentor to you in your quest to find not only a brave leader but also a trusted adviser.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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