Advertising
Advertising

Why You Shouldn’t Shy Away From Being a Group Leader

Why You Shouldn’t Shy Away From Being a Group Leader

“This will be a group project.”

I hear these words and I nearly always face palm. Then my thoughts race: Why, oh, why, can’t we just do these projects separately? That way I can work at my own pace, using my own ideas, and make sure my work is the best it can be instead of trying to corral the inevitable lazy group member or two in to barely doing their part. That is, if they even do their work at all.

Advertising

It seems I always end up being the group leader, project compiler, or editor—without fail. I have spent a good deal of my group-working life being annoyed by it. Why should I have to feel like I have to be the most competent, organized person in the group? Why should I shoulder that responsibility the vast majority of the time? Why aren’t there more self-starters and competent wordsmiths among my peers?

Let’s face it: nobody wants to be the group leader. When my teachers in high school asked for groups to assign their leaders, everyone’s eyes darted nervously around the room. Such situations quickly became an anxiety-fueled game of “nose goes,” and I eventually ended up having to put my big girl pants on and say, “I’ll be the group leader.”

Advertising

But then I became, almost happily, resigned to my fate. If I am a good student and worker, if I get commendations from my professors and supervisors for my competence and organization, then why shouldn’t I lead the group?

Being a Group Leader Has its Benefits

Leadership is a valuable attribute to have, as are the associated characteristics that inevitably follow it. Why not assume your project’s leadership role if you are good at delegating tasks and following up with your group mates to make sure those tasks get done? What’s so scary about answering your group mates’ questions, providing resources, or acting as an intermediary between your group and your professor or supervisor?

Advertising

Nothing! Because these are exactly the skills that employers are looking for. They are looking for organized, competent, charismatic self-starters with good work ethics.

And that’s exactly why I stopped harrumphing and face palming when professors and supervisors declare a group task. It is just another opportunity to hone skills that I will inevitably need in the workforce. There’s hardly a discipline in which you can work all by your lonesome. You will never escape group work. You can, however, make it easier on yourself.

Advertising

How to make any group project go more smoothly:

  • Assign a good leader. Assign someone who you think is competent and reliable. If this is you, make sure you are ready for the commitment, because your group mates’ grade or position at work depends on it.
  • Be clear about communication guidelines. When your group forms, be clear about what you expect communications-wise. If a group email is sent, do you want a response within six hours? Twenty-four hours? Set limits to create accountability.
  • Delegate responsibilities right away. Define what needs to be done, what tasks should be handled by which roles, and then assign those roles to your group members. Make sure everyone knows what everyone else’s responsibilities are, so that there is no confusion.
  • Don’t slack off. Don’t submit a rough draft to the team editor that is completely sub-par (read: text lingo, run-on sentences, silly spelling mistakes, etc.). Don’t be that person. No one likes to have to spend more time editing your work than you put in to writing it. It also negatively impacts your authority as a scholar and a professional.

Generally, if these basic guidelines are in place, the group should be a happy one. Don’t slack off simply because you don’t like group work, as you will need these skills in any job. Don’t balk at being the group leader, either. Recognize it as the opportunity that it is to polish your people skills and impress your superiors.

More by this author

Why You Shouldn’t Shy Away From Being a Group Leader 28 Free or Cheap Ways to Entertain Yourself At Home How to Safely Buy a Used Car on Craigslist

Trending in Work

1 10 Things You Should Do If You’re Unemployed 2 How to Ace an Interview: 10 Tips from a Professional Career Advisor 3 5 Books You Must Read if You Want to Be a Millionaire in Your 20’s 4 8 Life-Changing Skills You Can Learn in Less Than 6 Months 5 5 Types of Leadership Styles (And Which Is Best for You)

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on June 26, 2019

10 Things You Should Do If You’re Unemployed

10 Things You Should Do If You’re Unemployed

Regardless of your background, times today are tough. Uneven economies around the world have made it incredibly difficult for many people to find work.

Regardless of age and qualification, stretches of unemployment have affected us all in recent years. While we might not be able to control being unemployed, we can control how we react to it.

Despite difficult conditions, there are many ways to grow and stay hopeful. Whether you’re looking for work, or just taking a breather between assignments, these 10 endeavors will keep you busy and productive. Plus, some may even help push your resume to the top of the next pile.

Here’re 10 things you should do when you’re unemployed:

1. Keep a Schedule

It’s fine to take a few days after you’re finished at work to relax, but try not to get too comfortable.

Advertising

As welcoming as permanently moving into your sweatpants may seem, keeping a schedule is one way to stay productive and focused. While unemployed, if you continue to start your day early, you are more likely to get more done. Also, keeping up with day to day tasks makes you less likely to grow depressed or inactive.

2. Join a Temp Agency

One of the easiest ways to bridge the gap between jobs is to find temporary work, or work with a temp agency. While many unemployed people job hunt religiously, rememberer to include temp agencies in the search.

While not a permanent solution, you will be in a better position financially while you search for something permanent.

3. Work Online

Another great option if you’re unemployed is online work. Many different sites offer a variety of ways to make money online, but make sure the site you’re working for is reputable.

Micro job sites such as fiverr, as well as sites that pay for you to take surveys, are all quick, legitimate options. While these sites sometimes offer lower pay, it’s always better to move forward slowly than not at all.

Advertising

4. Get Organized

Unemployment is an excellent opportunity to get organized. Embark on some spring cleaning, go through old boxes, and get rid of the things you don’t need. Streamlining your life will help you dive head first into the next chapter, plus it helps you feel like your unemployed time is spent productively.

5. Exercise

Much like organizing your life, another good way to keep yourself enthusiastic and healthy is to exercise. It doesn’t take much to get slightly more active, and exercise can help you stay positive. Even a walk around the block a few times a week can do a lot for keeping you motivated and determined. If you take care of yourself, you can make the most of this extra time.

6. Volunteer

Volunteering is an excellent way to use extra time when you’re unemployed. Additionally, if you volunteer in an area related to your job qualifications, you can often include the experience on your resume.

Not only that, doing good is a true mood booster and is sure to help you stay optimistic while looking for your next job.

7. Increase Your Skills

Looking for ways to increase your job skills while unemployed is a good way to move forward as well. Look for certifications or training you could take, especially those offered for free.

Advertising

You can qualify more for even entry level positions with extra training in your line of work, and many cities or states offer job skills training. Refreshing your resume, and interview and job skills may make your job hunt easier.

8. Treat Yourself

Unemployment can be trying and tiring, so don’t forget to treat yourself occasionally. Take a reasonable amount of time off from your weekly job hunt to recharge and rest up. Letting yourself rest will maximize your productivity during the hours you job search.

Even if you don’t have extra money for entertainment, a walk or visit to the park can do wonders to help you go back and attack your job hunt.

9. See What You Can Sell

Another good way to bridge the gap between jobs is to sell unused possessions. eBay and Amazon are both secure sites, but traditional garage sales are a fine option too. Sell off a few video games, or some electronics, for some quick and easy cash while you figure out a permanent solution.

10. Take a Course

Much like training and certifications, taking a class can be a good way to keep yourself sharp while unemployed. Especially when you’re between jobs, it can be easy to forget this option, as most courses cost money. Don’t forget the mass of free educational tools online.

Advertising

Keeping your brain sharp can help you stay focused and may even help you learn some new, relevant job skills.

The Bottom Line

While unemployment numbers are still high, there are many things you can do to better yourself and move forward. While new skills to aid your job hung might seem out of reach, there are plenty of free ways to get ahead, online and off.

Additionally, don’t forget that taking time for yourself can do wonders for keeping you productive in your job hunt. While it is a challenge, don’t give up–being unemployed can offer you extra time to better yourself, and possibly grow more qualified to find work.

Featured photo credit: Resume – Glasses/Flazingo Photos via flickr.com

Read Next