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Why You Shouldn’t Shy Away From Being a Group Leader

Why You Shouldn’t Shy Away From Being a Group Leader

“This will be a group project.”

I hear these words and I nearly always face palm. Then my thoughts race: Why, oh, why, can’t we just do these projects separately? That way I can work at my own pace, using my own ideas, and make sure my work is the best it can be instead of trying to corral the inevitable lazy group member or two in to barely doing their part. That is, if they even do their work at all.

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It seems I always end up being the group leader, project compiler, or editor—without fail. I have spent a good deal of my group-working life being annoyed by it. Why should I have to feel like I have to be the most competent, organized person in the group? Why should I shoulder that responsibility the vast majority of the time? Why aren’t there more self-starters and competent wordsmiths among my peers?

Let’s face it: nobody wants to be the group leader. When my teachers in high school asked for groups to assign their leaders, everyone’s eyes darted nervously around the room. Such situations quickly became an anxiety-fueled game of “nose goes,” and I eventually ended up having to put my big girl pants on and say, “I’ll be the group leader.”

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But then I became, almost happily, resigned to my fate. If I am a good student and worker, if I get commendations from my professors and supervisors for my competence and organization, then why shouldn’t I lead the group?

Being a Group Leader Has its Benefits

Leadership is a valuable attribute to have, as are the associated characteristics that inevitably follow it. Why not assume your project’s leadership role if you are good at delegating tasks and following up with your group mates to make sure those tasks get done? What’s so scary about answering your group mates’ questions, providing resources, or acting as an intermediary between your group and your professor or supervisor?

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Nothing! Because these are exactly the skills that employers are looking for. They are looking for organized, competent, charismatic self-starters with good work ethics.

And that’s exactly why I stopped harrumphing and face palming when professors and supervisors declare a group task. It is just another opportunity to hone skills that I will inevitably need in the workforce. There’s hardly a discipline in which you can work all by your lonesome. You will never escape group work. You can, however, make it easier on yourself.

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How to make any group project go more smoothly:

  • Assign a good leader. Assign someone who you think is competent and reliable. If this is you, make sure you are ready for the commitment, because your group mates’ grade or position at work depends on it.
  • Be clear about communication guidelines. When your group forms, be clear about what you expect communications-wise. If a group email is sent, do you want a response within six hours? Twenty-four hours? Set limits to create accountability.
  • Delegate responsibilities right away. Define what needs to be done, what tasks should be handled by which roles, and then assign those roles to your group members. Make sure everyone knows what everyone else’s responsibilities are, so that there is no confusion.
  • Don’t slack off. Don’t submit a rough draft to the team editor that is completely sub-par (read: text lingo, run-on sentences, silly spelling mistakes, etc.). Don’t be that person. No one likes to have to spend more time editing your work than you put in to writing it. It also negatively impacts your authority as a scholar and a professional.

Generally, if these basic guidelines are in place, the group should be a happy one. Don’t slack off simply because you don’t like group work, as you will need these skills in any job. Don’t balk at being the group leader, either. Recognize it as the opportunity that it is to polish your people skills and impress your superiors.

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Last Updated on August 20, 2018

Quit Your Job If You Don’t Like It, No Matter What

Quit Your Job If You Don’t Like It, No Matter What

Do you know that feeling? The one where you have to wake up to go to your boring 9-5 job to work with the same boring colleagues who don’t appreciate what you do.

I do, and that’s why I’ve decided to quit my job and follow my passion. This, however, requires a solid plan and some guts.

The one who perseveres doesn’t always win. Sometimes life has more to offer when you quit your current job. Yes, I know. It’s overwhelming and scary.

People who quit are often seen as ‘losers’. They say: “You should finish what you’ve started”.

I know like no other that quitting your job can be very stressful. A dozen questions come up when you’re thinking about quitting your job, most starting with: What if?

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“What if I don’t find a job I love and regret quitting my current job?”
“What if I can’t find another job and I get in debt because I can’t pay my bills?”
“What if my family and friends judge me and disapprove of the decisions I make?”
“What if I quit my job to pursue my dream, but I fail?

After all, if you admit to the truth of your surroundings, you’re forced to acknowledge that you’ve made a wrong decision by choosing your current job. But don’t forget that quitting certain things in life can be the path to your success!

One of my favorite quotes by Henry Ford:

If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve always got.

Everything takes energy

Everything you do in life takes energy. It takes energy to participate in your weekly activities. It takes energy to commute to work every day. It takes energy to organize your sister’s big wedding.

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Each of the responsibilities we have take a little bit of our energy. We only have a certain amount of energy a day, so we have to spend it wisely.  Same goes for our time. The only things we can’t buy in this world are time and energy. Yes, you could buy an energy drink, but will it feel the same as eight hours of sleep? Will it be as healthy?

The more stress there is in your life, the less focus you have. This will weaken your results.

Find something that is worth doing

Do you have to quit every time the going gets touch? Absolutely not! You should quit when you’ve put everything you’ve got into something, but don’t see a bright future in it.

When you do something you love and that has purpose in your life, you should push through and give everything you have.

I find star athletes very inspiring. They don’t quit till they step on that stage to receive their hard earned gold medal. From the start, they know how much work its going to take and what they have to sacrifice.

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When you do something you’re really passionate about, you’re not in a downward spiral. Before you even start you can already see the finish line. The more focus you have for something, the faster you’ll reach the finish.

It is definitely possible to spend your valuable time on something you love and earn money doing it. You just have to find out how — by doing enough research.

Other excuses I often hear are:

“But I have my wife and kids, who is going to pay the bills?”
“I don’t have time for that, I’m too busy with… stuff” (Like watching TV for 2 hours every day.)
“At least I get the same paycheck every month if I work for a boss.”
“Quitting my job is too much risk with this crisis.”

I understand those points. But if you’ve never tried it, you’ll never know how it could be. The fear of failure keeps people from stepping out of their comfort zone.

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I’ve heard many people say, “I work to let my children make their dream come true”. I think they should rephrase that sentence to: “I pursue my dreams — to inspire and show my children anything is possible.” 

Conclusion

Think carefully about what you spend your time on. Don’t waste it on things that don’t brighten your future. Instead, search for opportunities. And come up with a solid plan before you take any impulsive actions.

Only good things happen outside of your comfort zone.

Do you dare to quit your job for more success in life?

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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