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6 Ways to Develop a Strong and Fulfilling Company Culture

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6 Ways to Develop a Strong and Fulfilling Company Culture

A lot of startups are mimicking what was successful in the past for companies like Google or Apple. They should stop doing that. They will never be the next Google or Apple if they imitate the mindsets of Google or Apple. Earn a place among their ranks by creating a unique company culture which will inspire future startups instead of molding a company culture based off previous successes. But how do you do that? Here are 6 ways to develop an incredibly strong and extremely fulfilling company culture.

1. Put someone in charge.

Almost any project needs a leader, and the project to develop a company culture is no exception. That leader needs to truly understand people. It would be great if you could find a psychology major who knows the nitty gritty of how people interact, but that’s probably not feasible for most companies. Instead, hire someone who fits your company’s needs and also reads people exceptionally well. If you hire someone else who understands where the pieces fit as well as or better than you, you won’t have to solve the company culture puzzle all by yourself.

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2. Base the culture on the company.

Your company culture should absolutely not be created in a vacuum. To be a sustainable and fruitful culture, it needs to be inspired by the people you hire. Get inspired by all the special talents of your co-workers, as well as all their weaknesses, in order to develop a company culture that takes advantage of what everyone has to offer.

3. Remember that the goal is productivity.

Even though Google is known as a very liberating place to work, it’s still based in a structure that encourages workers to get things done. Your business needs to follow the same principle. You want people to be happy to go to work, but you shouldn’t let that get in the way of results. Be sure to not concern yourself with the well-being of your employees quite as much as your employees’ contributions to your new business. To achieve a successful company culture, you need to focus on what will really make your business a success.

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4. Encourage diversity.

Look for co-workers who have skills and attitudes different to or even opposite from yours, compensating for the talents and mindsets that you lack. Hiring a group of yes-men won’t net you anything but answers in the affirmative. Look for people who will readily disagree with you if they believe that they have a better idea. The legacies of company leaders like Jobs and Gates and Bezos loom large, but remember that the great businesses are made up of much more than just the opinions of the figurehead.

5. Pull out the weeds.

Don’t be afraid of firing people, even though firing them is one of the hardest part of being a boss. If you don’t pull out the weeds, they’ll just take over the rest of your soil. If a member of your team isn’t pushing you towards your overall goal, pull that person out of the way of growth. Be kind and fair, but at the same time, leave feelings aside and do what’s best for both your company and your company culture. Otherwise, your business will never gain root.

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6. Set the example.

To encourage a great company culture, you have to represent the company to the very best of your abilities. Be the leader that people look up to and the person they respect. As the head of your company, everyone else will be following you down the trail, so be a trailblazer. Heed the advice of this Lifehack article about different leadership styles to figure out what kind of authority figure you need to emulate.

Featured photo credit: Startup Weekend LA/Philippe Lewicki via flickr.com

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Matt OKeefe

Matt is a marketer and writer who shares about lifestyle and productivity tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on November 15, 2021

20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

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20 Ways to Describe Yourself in a Job Interview

“Please describe yourself in a few words”.

It’s the job interview of your life and you need to come up with something fast. Mental pictures of words are mixing in your head and your tongue tastes like alphabet soup. You mutter words like “deterministic” or “innovativity” and you realize you’re drenched in sweat. You wish you had thought about this. You wish you had read this post before.

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    Image Credit: Career Employer

    Here are 20 sentences that you could use when you are asked to describe yourself. Choose the ones that describe you the best.

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    “I am someone who…”:

    1. “can adapt to any situation. I thrive in a fluctuating environment and I transform unexpected obstacles into stepping stones for achievements.”
    2. “consistently innovates to create value. I find opportunities where other people see none: I turn ideas into projects, and projects into serial success.”
    3. “has a very creative mind. I always have a unique perspective when approaching an issue due to my broad range of interests and hobbies. Creativity is the source of differentiation and therefore, at the root of competitive advantage.”
    4. “always has an eye on my target. I endeavour to deliver high-quality work on time, every time. Hiring me is the only real guarantee for results.”
    5. “knows this job inside and out. With many years of relevant experience, there is no question whether I will be efficient on the job. I can bring the best practices to the company.”
    6. “has a high level of motivation to work here. I have studied the entire company history and observed its business strategies. Since I am also a long-time customer, I took the opportunity to write this report with some suggestions for how to improve your services.”
    7. “has a pragmatic approach to things. I don’t waste time talking about theory or the latest buzz words of the bullshit bingo. Only one question matters to me: ‘Does it work or not?'”
    8. “takes work ethics very seriously. I do what I am paid for, and I do it well.”
    9. “can make decisions rapidly if needed. Everybody can make good decisions with sufficient time and information. The reality of our domain is different. Even with time pressure and high stakes, we need to move forward by taking charge and being decisive. I can do that.”
    10. “is considered to be ‘fun.’ I believe that we are way more productive when we are working with people with which we enjoy spending time. When the situation gets tough with a customer, a touch of humour can save the day.”
    11. “works as a real team-player. I bring the best out of the people I work with and I always do what I think is best for the company.”
    12. “is completely autonomous. I won’t need to be micromanaged. I won’t need to be trained. I understand high-level targets and I know how to achieve them.”
    13. “leads people. I can unite people around a vision and motivate a team to excellence. I expect no more from the others than what I expect from myself.”
    14. “understands the complexity of advanced project management. It’s not just pushing triangles on a GANTT chart; it’s about getting everyone to sit down together and to agree on the way forward. And that’s a lot more complicated than it sounds.”
    15. “is the absolute expert in the field. Ask anybody in the industry. My name is on their lips because I wrote THE book on the subject.”
    16. “communicates extensively. Good, bad or ugly, I believe that open communication is the most important factor to reach an efficient organization.”
    17. “works enthusiastically. I have enough motivation for myself and my department. I love what I do, and it’s contagious.”
    18. “has an eye for details because details matter the most. How many companies have failed because of just one tiny detail? Hire me and you’ll be sure I’ll find that detail.”
    19. “can see the big picture. Beginners waste time solving minor issues. I understand the purpose of our company, tackle the real subjects and the top management will eventually notice it.”
    20. “is not like anyone you know. I am the candidate you would not expect. You can hire a corporate clone, or you can hire someone who will bring something different to the company. That’s me. “

    Featured photo credit: Tim Gouw via unsplash.com

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