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10 Simple Tips to Help You Understand and Get Along With Introverts in Your Workplace

10 Simple Tips to Help You Understand and Get Along With Introverts in Your Workplace

The introvert label is highly misunderstood. In an article published by Forbes, Author Susan Cain sums up the word perfectly by describing introverts as “men of contemplation” – a distinct difference from the usual assumption that they’re shy, unconfident and quiet. Fundamentally, while the introvert enjoys the company of others, they are equally comfortable alone. By trying to understand the needs of your introvert workforce, you’ll not only feel more comfortable in their presence, but will really help their creativity flourish.

Here are a few tips and facts about introverts to help you understand them better.

1. They think before they talk

Introverts thoroughly process information before they speak their mind. If you’re running a business meeting, it’s always worth circling back after you’ve given them a little time to mull things over.

2. They are good listeners

Introverts are often perceived as ignorant in the workplace as they’re rarely forerunners in the conversation. But, you can be damn sure that they’ll be listening in the background and waiting for the opportune moment to express their thoughts.

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A good listener

    3. They enjoy their own company

    Of course, as a boss you’ll no doubt favor employees who work well in a team. According to Peter Vogt of Career Advice Monster – a self-confessed introvert – isolation is when an introvert thrives, so consider taking a step back and leaving them to their own devices when possible.

    4. They are often methodological

    Most introverts are highly methodological people who have excellent analytical skills. When you need someone patient and focused to undertake mundane tasks that extroverts despise, they’ll not only enjoy the process more, but will do a better job.

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    Methodical Visitor Examining The Floor Plan

      5. They work better when it’s quiet

      Introverts perform better in quiet spaces, which is one of the reasons why they often choose solitary professions such as writing, accounting and programming. If you have a predominantly introvert workforce, try making your office a calmer environment.

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        6. They usually make better salespeople

        While extroverts often lead a business due to their dominant demeanor, introverts make better salespeople as they’re more inclined to listen to a client or a lead’s expectations and opinions.

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        Happy smiling female help desk operator on a phone with customer

          7. They work well with extroverts

          Researcher Brian Little states that “when an introvert and extrovert engage in conversation, the introvert will take on the role of the interviewer.” This can actually be a more effective way of communication among employees with regards to team-related activities.

          8. They are better at job interviews

          Extroverts often go into interviews and meetings full of adrenaline and pumped to make a good impression; however, this often causes them to lose focus. Introverts on the other hand will listen, absorb, and then speak, giving them more time to consider their answers.

          Interview

            9. They are more engaged with their work

            Trying to get employees motivated about working is not an easy task. Employee engagement agency Berghind Joseph states that commitment will only come when an employee feels respected and that their work has purpose. Introverts are already naturally more engaged with their work. So take some time each day to say some good things to your introvert workers and they’ll no doubt feel an even deeper sense of pride.

            10. They can become an extrovert

            Contrary to popular belief, introverts can actually be very engaging in a public speaking situation. Although it won’t come as naturally to them and they will often “burn out” quicker, using an introvert to deliver a short keynote speech can be highly effective. Just remember to cut them some slack afterwards, as they’ll almost certainly need a little time to regenerate.

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              As the old saying goes, “Never judge a book by its cover.” An introvert workforce can be a blessing in disguise; you just need to learn how to engage with them.

              Image source: Dollar photo Club

              Featured photo credit: Dollar Photo Club via dpc2.ftcdn.net

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              Last Updated on March 31, 2020

              How to Use Visual Learning to Work More Effectively

              How to Use Visual Learning to Work More Effectively

              Knowledge is essential to become successful in life, your career and your business. Without learning new concepts and becoming proficient in our craft, we cannot excel in our chosen careers or archive knowledge to pass down to the next generation.

              But content comes in various forms, and because how we learn influences how much we know, we need to talk about learning styles. This article will focus on how to utilize visual learning to boost your career or business.

              The Importance of Knowing Your Learning Style

              Knowing your learning style enables you to process new information to the best of your ability. Not only does it reduce your learning curve, you’re able to communicate these same concepts to others effectively.

              But it all starts when you’re able to first identify the best way you learn.

              As a college student, I soon figured out that taking online courses without visual aids or having an instructor in front of me led to poor retention of concepts.

              Sure, I got good grades and performed excellently in my online exams. However. I discovered that I couldn’t maintain this performance level because I forgot 80 percent of the course content by the end of the semester.

              There are several types of learning styles known to mankind. To give an idea of how visual learning stacks up against other learning styles, here’s a brief mention of some of the different types of learning styles we have.

              The four most popular types of learning styles are:

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              • Visual learning style (what this article talks about).
              • Aural or auditory learning style (learning by listening to information presented).
              • Verbal or linguistic learning style (learning that involves speech and writing).
              • Tactile learning style (learning by touching and doing)

              But for the purposes of this article, we will be focusing on using visual learning to boost your career or business.

              How to Know If You’re a Visual Learner?

              When it comes to boosting your career, business (or education), a visual learner is one who would most definitely choose shapes, images, symbols, or reading over auditory messages.

              I’m talking about preferring to read an actual map when navigating to a new place over listening to verbal directions. I’m talking about discovering that you actually have trouble remembering what your manager said at the meeting because there were no graphs or illustrations to support the points raised.

              Most people who struggle with learning probably aren’t leveraging their best learning styles. The earlier you identify how your learning style can boost your success, the less struggle you will encounter with processing new information throughout your career.

              However, visual learning in particular CAN 10x your career or business whether it is your preferred learning style or not. And here’s why:

              Several studies have arrived at the conclusion that the brain retains more information with the help of visual aids. In other words, images are directly processed by our long-term memory which helps us store information for longer periods of time.[1]

              While some lessons can be performed orally, several concepts can only make sense if you have an image with an explanation of sequences (i.e learning about the human DNA).

              Visual learning does use a different part of the brain and visual cues are processed by the part of the brain known as the occipital lobe.

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              By engaging more parts of the brain during learning, you’re able to have a fuller understanding of concepts and facilitate better interaction with your immediate environment.

              How to Use Visual Learning for Success

              Here’re 4 ways to use visual learning to boost your career or business:

              1. Bring back the to-do list. Then add shapes and colors to boost productivity.

              We live in an age where computers have taken over virtually every aspect of productivity and most human functions. But written lists are making a comeback, and with an endless number of important tasks to complete, having a to-do list of tasks in order of importance can improve your productivity.

              While coming up with a list is initially challenging, adding colors and shapes to written lists that you personally write and manage gives you an extra layer of assurance and boosts aids recall so that you actually get stuff done.

              I have tried this technique in my work as a registered nurse and discovered that adding shapes and colors to to-do lists helps me delegate tasks, recognize where more work is needed, and makes it easy to cross off completed tasks at the end of the day.

              2. Add graphs, charts and symbols to your reports.

              Yes, it seems like more work cut out for you. However, graphs enable you monitor the heartbeat of your business.

              Graphs and charts help you trend your finances, budget, and pretty much any data overtime. With the help of free and premium software available on the market, it has become easier to take plain data and in a matter of seconds, have relevant information displayed in different shapes and images.

              As an entrepreneur, you can make predictions and allocate funds wisely when you’re able to see whether your efforts are rewarded. You can use colors and charts to delegate actions to members of your team and track performance at the same time.

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              And when broken down into monthly, quarterly, bi-annual or annual goals, graphs and charts communicate what ordinary text cannot.

              3. Effectively brainstorm with mind-mapping.

              Mind-mapping is not new but I don’t think it’s been talked about as often as we do to-do lists.

              With mind mapping, you’re organizing information accurately and drawing relationships between concepts and pieces from a whole.

              Think of a mind map as a tree with several branches. For example, the tree can symbolize healthcare while each branch stands for nursing, medicine, laboratory science, and so on. When you look at nursing, you can further branch out into types of nursing; pediatric, women’s health, critical care, and so on.

              It’s an interesting relationship; the more ideas you’re able to come up with for your chosen subject, the deeper you get and the stronger the association.

              Mind maps really show you relationships between subjects and topics, and simplifies processes that might seem complicated at first glance. In a way, it is like a graphical representation of facts presented in a simple, visual format.

              Mind mapping isn’t only limited to career professionals; business owners can benefit from mind mapping by organizing their online learning activities and breaking down complex tasks into simple actions so that you can accurately measure productivity.

              4. Add video streaming to meetings.

              What if you could double the productivity of your team members by video streaming your meetings or adding flash animation to your presentation at the same time?

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              When you offer video as an alternative method of processing information to colleagues, there is a greater chance of retaining information because we recreate these stories into images in our minds.

              For organizations that hold virtual meetings, it can also be an effective way to enhance performance during if people can see their colleagues in addition to flash animation or whatever form of video is provided during the meeting.

              Is Visual Learning Better Than Other Learning Styles?

              No, that is not the point. The goal here is to supplement your existing dominant learning style with visual learning so that you can experience a significant boost in how you process and use everyday information.

              You might discover that understanding scientific concepts are much easier after incorporating visual learning or that you’re able to understand your organization’s value when projected on a visual screen with charts and graphs.

              The overall goal is to always be learning and to continue to leverage visual learning style in your career and business.

              More About Learning Styles

              Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

              Reference

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