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Top 10 Tablets You Need To Know By The End Of This Year

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Top 10 Tablets You Need To Know By The End Of This Year

I’ve had a tablet for a couple years now and I have to say, they’re pretty nifty devices. But with new technology coming out at such a frenetic pace, it can be hard to keep up with all of the tablets being released by companies these days. Below I’ve compiled a list of tablets you should probably become familiar with, if only because you might want to buy one as a gift for yourself or someone you know this holiday season! Just as a disclaimer, these tablets aren’t in any ranked order as each serves a different need.

10. iPad Air ($399)

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    Although it’s been replaced by the iPad Air 2, last year’s version will still serve all of your needs well enough. It’s equipped with an A7 processor that, while slightly dated, is still packed with more than enough power to run everything you could possibly want to run.

    9. Google Nexus 7 ($129)

    10tabs#2

      The Nexus 7 was released in 2012 as Google’s answer to the iPad. I own that version, but since then they’ve released two new iterations. The one linked here is the 2013 Nexus 7, which is equipped with a 1080p screen and a processor that will easily power Android L and any app you could ever want to run, all for an insanely low price.

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      8. iPad Mini 2 ($299)

      10tabs#3

        Last year’s iPad Mini, much like its larger counterpart, can be had for a steal now if you can find one. It is comparable to the Nexus 7, but comes equipped with Apple’s operating system and build quality. If you have an iPhone 5S then you know exactly how the Mini 2 performs, as they have the exact same electronic innards.

        7. Microsoft Surface Pro 3 ($999)

        10tabs#4

          At nearly a thousand dollars, the Surface Pro 3 is priced more like a laptop than a tablet, and perhaps for good reason. Its main appeal is that it basically transforms into a laptop when you need to do your work, and reverts back into a tablet when you’re looking to consume content. If you want something that is both a jack of all trades and a master of some, this is the device for you.

          6. iPad Mini 3 ($399)

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          10tabs#5

            If you’ve got some extra cash burning a hole in your pocket, you might be interested in the iPad Mini 3 over the iPad Mini 2. The only real difference between the two models is the addition of Touch ID and the ubiquitous gold color option, so only buy it if these are features you are really into.

            5. Amazon Fire HD 6 ($99)

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              You read that right. For a little under one hundred dollars, a brand-spanking-new Amazon tablet can be yours this holiday season. I’m not sure if I would suggest getting this if you already have a large-screened smartphone, but if you have a child or need a separate device for e-reading, this might be the tablet for you.

              4. Google Nexus 9 ($399)

              10tabs#7

                Google ended its Nexus 7 line this year and instead chose to release the Nexus 9 as a direct competitor to the iPad Air 2. The 9 is still a great tablet by any measure, and I can vouch for Android L as its been performing pretty well on my old Nexus 7. Just know that it’s not quite as powerful as the competition (the flip side being that the Nexus 9 is cheaper).

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                3. iPad Air 2 ($499)

                10tabs#8

                  With the iPad Air 2, you’re basically getting everything you could want in a tablet. Unlike the Mini 3, which was basically the Mini 2 with a fresh coat of gold paint, the Air 2 is an entirely different beast compared to its predecessor. This is mainly due to its new processor, the A8X, which uses three cores and is about as future proof as a mobile processing unit can get. Indeed, if you are an Apple fan and are wondering about how the iPhone 6S might perform next year, the Air 2 might just give you some hints as to what you can expect.

                  2. Samsung Galaxy Tab S ($499)

                  10tabs#9

                    Priced to compete directly with the iPad Air 2 and Nexus 9, the Tab S is a beast of a device. While its build quality isn’t quite up to the standards of its competitors, and its software is a bit clunkier to use, its got a magical screen (at least if you believe all of the reviews). Plus, you have options, as this tablet comes in both 9- and 11-inch varieties.

                    1. Google Nexus 7 2012 ($149)

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                    10tabs#10

                      Nearly two and a half years after its release, the original Nexus 7 is still a great device if you’re not a power user. I use mine all the time as an e-reader and gaming device, and it even runs the newest Android operating system fairly well. The price listed is a bit misleading; you can get a 32gb model for far less (usually around $80) if you buy a used one. That’s a lot of tablet for a tiny amount of cash! It’s sort of a reminder of how quickly technology improves, as it feels like just yesterday.

                      At the end of the day, most tablets accomplish the same tasks, and if you can find a great deal on any of these I’d snap them up. Happy hunting!

                      Featured photo credit: Tablets/ Martin Votrl via flickr.com

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                      Last Updated on November 25, 2021

                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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                      How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

                      There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

                      Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

                        What Does Private Browsing Do?

                        When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

                        For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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                        The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

                        The Terminal Archive

                        While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

                        Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

                        dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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                        Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

                        Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

                        However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

                        Clearing Your Tracks

                        Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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                        dscacheutil -flushcache

                        As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

                        Other Browsers and Private Browsing

                        Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

                        If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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                        As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

                        Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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