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Run Better, Faster, and More Efficiently With runScribe

Run Better, Faster, and More Efficiently With runScribe

In a website full of innovative, spectacular projects, it’s exciting to see some Kickstarter projects for the health and fitness market too. Running enthusiasts will be happy to see the forward-thinking features used in runScribe, a current Kickstarter. At first glance runScribe is a standard running sensor, yet it brings a lot more than expected to the table. Superb technology and streamlined usability make this Kickstarter project one to look out for. Here’s why:

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    A tiny device, runScribe goes beyond the average running sensor or app. runScribe not only captures your run, it measures your foot’s precise position while you run. The device also features on board flash storage (so you can sync your runs to your other devices later), and is easy to swap between different pairs of shoes. Not only that, the sensor integrates with runScribe’s website and apps, plus it breaks your run into different metrics.

    Get the data you want with 13 different metrics

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      runScribe claims to give you the most run data available outside of a laboratory setting, and breaks these data down into 13 different run metrics. By breaking down each stride, your run is easier to understand than ever. The current runScribe metrics are number of steps, distance, pace, stride rate, stride length, contact time, foot strike type, swing excursion, stance excursion, max pronation, two pronation excursion measurements, impact peak, and brake peak. These details make it much easier to set specific goals, and let you improve your run at the core of your habits. 

      There’s no need for a cell signal to record data

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        To accomplish all this, runScribe’s tiny device is jam packed with useful technology. At its heart, runScribe uses a nine-axis sensor and processor to read the specifics of each footstep. The device also uses on board flash memory to save your run data, so you don’t have to weigh yourself down with your phone. This on board storage also means that you can still record data if you’re somewhere with no cell signal or GPS, which is sure to thrill off-road runners and joggers.

        Incredibly small and light

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          Despite these inspiring features, however, the device is outstandingly portable. Weighing in at only 15 grams, the device comes with two shoe mounts, as well as extra batteries. All this technology is most impressive when combined with the features of each runner’s free runScribe account. The account lets users view their running metric categories as maps, graphically, and over time. This lets users break down exactly where they’re improving or not. Of course, if you already use a running app you love, the device also supports Bluetooth (and possibly standard running device formats), so runners will be able to sync data into virtually any running app. However, the runScribe site also allows you to import running data from other apps, so you don’t lose past data if you prefer the runScribe site.

          Three different account options

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            Finally, the runScribe features are divided into three different accounts: runScribe, runScribe Pro, and runScribe Science. The first account is free, and offers access to the first seven running metrics. runScribe Pro offers access to all metrics, and runScribe Science offers all metrics, as well as graphs of the raw data from your sensor. runScribe also offers users the ability to measure which shoes are right for them, and is working on offering GPS integration for mapping run locations. The runScribe site is also building an online database that will help reveal exactly how runners can avoid injuries. The device offers some exciting prospects for runners and joggers everywhere, and is slated to begin production in around October or November, 2014.

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            Alicia Prince

            A writer, filmmaker, and artist who shares about lifestyle tips and inspirations on Lifehack.

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            Last Updated on May 14, 2019

            8 Replacements for Google Notebook

            8 Replacements for Google Notebook

            Exploring alternatives to Google Notebook? There are more than a few ‘notebooks’ available online these days, although choosing the right one will likely depend on just what you use Google Notebook for.

            1. Zoho Notebook
              If you want to stick with something as close to Google Notebook as possible, Zoho Notebook may just be your best bet. The user interface has some significant changes, but in general, Zoho Notebook has pretty similar features. There is even a Firefox plugin that allows you to highlight content and drop it into your Notebook. You can go a bit further, though, dropping in any spreadsheets or documents you have in Zoho, as well as some applications and all websites — to the point that you can control a desktop remotely if you pare it with something like Zoho Meeting.
            2. Evernote
              The features that Evernote brings to the table are pretty great. In addition to allowing you to capture parts of a website, Evernote has a desktop search tool mobil versions (iPhone and Windows Mobile). It even has an API, if you’ve got any features in mind not currently available. Evernote offers 40 MB for free accounts — if you’ll need more, the premium version is priced at $5 per month or $45 per year. Encryption, size and whether you’ll see ads seem to be the main differences between the free and premium versions.
            3. Net Notes
              If the major allure for Google Notebooks lays in the Firefox extension, Net Notes might be a good alternative. It’s a Firefox extension that allows you to save notes on websites in your bookmarks. You can toggle the Net Notes sidebar and access your notes as you browse. You can also tag websites. Net Notes works with Mozilla Weave if you need to access your notes from multiple computers.
            4. i-Lighter
              You can highlight and save information from any website while you’re browsing with i-Lighter. You can also add notes to your i-Lighted information, as well as email it or send the information to be posted to your blog or Twitter account. Your notes are saved in a notebook on your computer — but they’re also synchronized to the iLighter website. You can log in to the site from any computer.
            5. Clipmarks
              For those browsers interested in sharing what they find with others, Clipmarks provides a tool to select clips of text, images and video and share them with friends. You can easily syndicate your finds to a whole list of sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Digg. You can also easily review your past clips and use them as references through Clipmarks’ website.
            6. UberNote
              If you can think of a way to send notes to UberNote, it can handle it. You can clip material while browsing, email, IM, text message or even visit the UberNote sites to add notes to the information you have saved. You can organize your notes, tag them and even add checkboxes if you want to turn a note into some sort of task list. You can drag and drop information between notes in order to manage them.
            7. iLeonardo
              iLeonardo treats research as a social concern. You can create a notebook on iLeonardo on a particular topic, collecting information online. You can also access other people’s notebooks. It may not necessarily take the place of Google Notebook — I’m pretty sure my notes on some subjects are cryptic — but it’s a pretty cool tool. You can keep notebooks private if you like the interface but don’t want to share a particular project. iLeonardo does allow you to follow fellow notetakers and receive the information they find on a particular topic.
            8. Zotero
              Another Firefox extension, Zotero started life as a citation management tool targeted towards academic researchers. However, it offers notetaking tools, as well as a way to save files to your notebook. If you do a lot of writing in Microsoft Word or Open Office, Zotero might be the tool for you — it’s integrated with both word processing software to allow you to easily move your notes over, as well as several blogging options. Zotero’s interface is also available in more than 30 languages.

            I’ve been relying on Google Notebook as a catch-all for blog post ideas — being able to just highlight information and save it is a great tool for a blogger.

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            In replacing it, though, I’m starting to lean towards Evernote. I’ve found it handles pretty much everything I want, especially with the voice recording feature. I’m planning to keep trying things out for a while yet — I’m sticking with Google Notebook until the Firefox extension quits working — and if you have any recommendations that I missed when I put together this list, I’d love to hear them — just leave a comment!

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