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Run Better, Faster, and More Efficiently With runScribe

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Run Better, Faster, and More Efficiently With runScribe

In a website full of innovative, spectacular projects, it’s exciting to see some Kickstarter projects for the health and fitness market too. Running enthusiasts will be happy to see the forward-thinking features used in runScribe, a current Kickstarter. At first glance runScribe is a standard running sensor, yet it brings a lot more than expected to the table. Superb technology and streamlined usability make this Kickstarter project one to look out for. Here’s why:

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    A tiny device, runScribe goes beyond the average running sensor or app. runScribe not only captures your run, it measures your foot’s precise position while you run. The device also features on board flash storage (so you can sync your runs to your other devices later), and is easy to swap between different pairs of shoes. Not only that, the sensor integrates with runScribe’s website and apps, plus it breaks your run into different metrics.

    Get the data you want with 13 different metrics

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      runScribe claims to give you the most run data available outside of a laboratory setting, and breaks these data down into 13 different run metrics. By breaking down each stride, your run is easier to understand than ever. The current runScribe metrics are number of steps, distance, pace, stride rate, stride length, contact time, foot strike type, swing excursion, stance excursion, max pronation, two pronation excursion measurements, impact peak, and brake peak. These details make it much easier to set specific goals, and let you improve your run at the core of your habits. 

      There’s no need for a cell signal to record data

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        To accomplish all this, runScribe’s tiny device is jam packed with useful technology. At its heart, runScribe uses a nine-axis sensor and processor to read the specifics of each footstep. The device also uses on board flash memory to save your run data, so you don’t have to weigh yourself down with your phone. This on board storage also means that you can still record data if you’re somewhere with no cell signal or GPS, which is sure to thrill off-road runners and joggers.

        Incredibly small and light

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        runScribe.kickstarter

          Despite these inspiring features, however, the device is outstandingly portable. Weighing in at only 15 grams, the device comes with two shoe mounts, as well as extra batteries. All this technology is most impressive when combined with the features of each runner’s free runScribe account. The account lets users view their running metric categories as maps, graphically, and over time. This lets users break down exactly where they’re improving or not. Of course, if you already use a running app you love, the device also supports Bluetooth (and possibly standard running device formats), so runners will be able to sync data into virtually any running app. However, the runScribe site also allows you to import running data from other apps, so you don’t lose past data if you prefer the runScribe site.

          Three different account options

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            Finally, the runScribe features are divided into three different accounts: runScribe, runScribe Pro, and runScribe Science. The first account is free, and offers access to the first seven running metrics. runScribe Pro offers access to all metrics, and runScribe Science offers all metrics, as well as graphs of the raw data from your sensor. runScribe also offers users the ability to measure which shoes are right for them, and is working on offering GPS integration for mapping run locations. The runScribe site is also building an online database that will help reveal exactly how runners can avoid injuries. The device offers some exciting prospects for runners and joggers everywhere, and is slated to begin production in around October or November, 2014.

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            Alicia Prince

            A writer, filmmaker, and artist who shares about lifestyle tips and inspirations on Lifehack.

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            Last Updated on November 25, 2021

            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

            There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

            Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

              What Does Private Browsing Do?

              When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

              For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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              The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

              The Terminal Archive

              While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

              Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

              dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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              Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

              Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

              However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

              Clearing Your Tracks

              Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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              dscacheutil -flushcache

              As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

              Other Browsers and Private Browsing

              Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

              If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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              As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

              Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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