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Run Better, Faster, and More Efficiently With runScribe

Run Better, Faster, and More Efficiently With runScribe

In a website full of innovative, spectacular projects, it’s exciting to see some Kickstarter projects for the health and fitness market too. Running enthusiasts will be happy to see the forward-thinking features used in runScribe, a current Kickstarter. At first glance runScribe is a standard running sensor, yet it brings a lot more than expected to the table. Superb technology and streamlined usability make this Kickstarter project one to look out for. Here’s why:

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    A tiny device, runScribe goes beyond the average running sensor or app. runScribe not only captures your run, it measures your foot’s precise position while you run. The device also features on board flash storage (so you can sync your runs to your other devices later), and is easy to swap between different pairs of shoes. Not only that, the sensor integrates with runScribe’s website and apps, plus it breaks your run into different metrics.

    Get the data you want with 13 different metrics

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      runScribe claims to give you the most run data available outside of a laboratory setting, and breaks these data down into 13 different run metrics. By breaking down each stride, your run is easier to understand than ever. The current runScribe metrics are number of steps, distance, pace, stride rate, stride length, contact time, foot strike type, swing excursion, stance excursion, max pronation, two pronation excursion measurements, impact peak, and brake peak. These details make it much easier to set specific goals, and let you improve your run at the core of your habits. 

      There’s no need for a cell signal to record data

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        To accomplish all this, runScribe’s tiny device is jam packed with useful technology. At its heart, runScribe uses a nine-axis sensor and processor to read the specifics of each footstep. The device also uses on board flash memory to save your run data, so you don’t have to weigh yourself down with your phone. This on board storage also means that you can still record data if you’re somewhere with no cell signal or GPS, which is sure to thrill off-road runners and joggers.

        Incredibly small and light

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          Despite these inspiring features, however, the device is outstandingly portable. Weighing in at only 15 grams, the device comes with two shoe mounts, as well as extra batteries. All this technology is most impressive when combined with the features of each runner’s free runScribe account. The account lets users view their running metric categories as maps, graphically, and over time. This lets users break down exactly where they’re improving or not. Of course, if you already use a running app you love, the device also supports Bluetooth (and possibly standard running device formats), so runners will be able to sync data into virtually any running app. However, the runScribe site also allows you to import running data from other apps, so you don’t lose past data if you prefer the runScribe site.

          Three different account options

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            Finally, the runScribe features are divided into three different accounts: runScribe, runScribe Pro, and runScribe Science. The first account is free, and offers access to the first seven running metrics. runScribe Pro offers access to all metrics, and runScribe Science offers all metrics, as well as graphs of the raw data from your sensor. runScribe also offers users the ability to measure which shoes are right for them, and is working on offering GPS integration for mapping run locations. The runScribe site is also building an online database that will help reveal exactly how runners can avoid injuries. The device offers some exciting prospects for runners and joggers everywhere, and is slated to begin production in around October or November, 2014.

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            Alicia Prince

            A writer, filmmaker, and artist who shares about lifestyle tips and inspirations on Lifehack.

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            Last Updated on February 15, 2019

            7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

            7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

            Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

            Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

            Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

            So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

            Joe’s Goals

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              Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

              Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

              Daytum

                Daytum

                is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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                Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                Excel or Numbers

                  If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                  What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                  Evernote

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                    I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                    Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                    Access or Bento

                      If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                      Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                      You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                      Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                      All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                      Conclusion

                      I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                      What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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