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Run Better, Faster, and More Efficiently With runScribe

Run Better, Faster, and More Efficiently With runScribe

In a website full of innovative, spectacular projects, it’s exciting to see some Kickstarter projects for the health and fitness market too. Running enthusiasts will be happy to see the forward-thinking features used in runScribe, a current Kickstarter. At first glance runScribe is a standard running sensor, yet it brings a lot more than expected to the table. Superb technology and streamlined usability make this Kickstarter project one to look out for. Here’s why:

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    A tiny device, runScribe goes beyond the average running sensor or app. runScribe not only captures your run, it measures your foot’s precise position while you run. The device also features on board flash storage (so you can sync your runs to your other devices later), and is easy to swap between different pairs of shoes. Not only that, the sensor integrates with runScribe’s website and apps, plus it breaks your run into different metrics.

    Get the data you want with 13 different metrics

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      runScribe claims to give you the most run data available outside of a laboratory setting, and breaks these data down into 13 different run metrics. By breaking down each stride, your run is easier to understand than ever. The current runScribe metrics are number of steps, distance, pace, stride rate, stride length, contact time, foot strike type, swing excursion, stance excursion, max pronation, two pronation excursion measurements, impact peak, and brake peak. These details make it much easier to set specific goals, and let you improve your run at the core of your habits. 

      There’s no need for a cell signal to record data

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        To accomplish all this, runScribe’s tiny device is jam packed with useful technology. At its heart, runScribe uses a nine-axis sensor and processor to read the specifics of each footstep. The device also uses on board flash memory to save your run data, so you don’t have to weigh yourself down with your phone. This on board storage also means that you can still record data if you’re somewhere with no cell signal or GPS, which is sure to thrill off-road runners and joggers.

        Incredibly small and light

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          Despite these inspiring features, however, the device is outstandingly portable. Weighing in at only 15 grams, the device comes with two shoe mounts, as well as extra batteries. All this technology is most impressive when combined with the features of each runner’s free runScribe account. The account lets users view their running metric categories as maps, graphically, and over time. This lets users break down exactly where they’re improving or not. Of course, if you already use a running app you love, the device also supports Bluetooth (and possibly standard running device formats), so runners will be able to sync data into virtually any running app. However, the runScribe site also allows you to import running data from other apps, so you don’t lose past data if you prefer the runScribe site.

          Three different account options

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            Finally, the runScribe features are divided into three different accounts: runScribe, runScribe Pro, and runScribe Science. The first account is free, and offers access to the first seven running metrics. runScribe Pro offers access to all metrics, and runScribe Science offers all metrics, as well as graphs of the raw data from your sensor. runScribe also offers users the ability to measure which shoes are right for them, and is working on offering GPS integration for mapping run locations. The runScribe site is also building an online database that will help reveal exactly how runners can avoid injuries. The device offers some exciting prospects for runners and joggers everywhere, and is slated to begin production in around October or November, 2014.

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            Last Updated on August 29, 2018

            5 Killer Online Journal Tools That Make Journaling Easier and More Fun

            5 Killer Online Journal Tools That Make Journaling Easier and More Fun

            Journaling is one of the most useful personal development tools around. Not only does it help us process emotions and experiences, work through internal conflicts and improve our self-awareness, it also provides us with a way to keep a day-to-day record of our lives. Traditionally an activity limited to pen and paper, the expansion of consumer technology has enabled journaling to go digital.

            Saving your journaling entries online enables you to access them from anywhere, without having to carry a notebook and pen around, and provides you with digital features, like tagging and search functions.

            Here are a list of five online journaling tools you can use to bring your practice into the modern age:

            1. 750words

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            750 words

              750words is a free online journaling tool created by Buster Benson. The site is based on the idea of “Morning Pages”; a journaling tool Julia Cameron suggests in her creativity course The Artist’s Way. Cameron advises aspiring creatives to start each morning with three pages of stream-of-consciousness writing to clear away the mental clutter, leaving you with a clearer mind to face the day.

              750 words is the three-page digital equivalent (assuming the average person writes 250 words per page) and lets you store all your journaling online. Each morning, you’ll receive a prompt asking you to write your 750 words, and the site keeps track of various statistics associated with your entries. The site uses a Regressive Imagery Dictionary to calculate the emotional content from your posts and provides feedback on features like your mood, and most commonly used words.

              750 words is simple to set up and is ideal for anyone who finds it challenging to maintain a consistent journaling practice. The site uses a number of incentives to motivate users, including animal badges awarded to journalers who complete a certain number of days in a row, leader boards, and opt-in monthly challenges.

              2. Ohlife

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              ohlife

                Ohlife is designed to make online journaling as easy as possible. Once you’ve signed up for your free account, the website will send you an email each day asking “How did your day go?” Simply reply to the email with as much or as little detail as you like, and your response will be stored on your account, ready to view next time you log in.

                Ohlife’s appeal lies in its simplicity: no stats, no social sharing, no complicated organisational systems—the site is designed to provide you with a private, online space. Simply respond to the email each day (or skip the days you’re busy) and Ohlife will do the rest.

                3. Oneword

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                  OneWord is a fun online tool that provides you with a single word as a prompt and gives you sixty seconds to write about it. The concept’s aim is to help writers learn how to flow, and the prompts range from the everyday mundane to the profound.

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                  Oneword is not a private journaling tool: if you sign up, your answers will be published on the site’s daily blog, which contains a stream of users’ answers, and might be used by Oneword in the future. If you’d rather keep your answers to yourself, you can still use the tool for fun without giving out any personal details.

                  4. Penzu

                    Penzu is a journaling tool that allows you to store your journaling notes online. The service also offers mobile apps for iOS, Android and Blackberry, so you can journal on the go and save your notes to your account. The basic service is free, however you can upgrade to Penzu Pro and get access to additional features, including military-grade encryption and the ability to save and sync data through your mobile, for $19 per year.

                    With either version of Penzu, you can insert pictures, and add tags and comments to entries, as well as search for older entries. You can set your posts to be private and viewable by you only, or share them with others.

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                    5. Evernote

                    Evernote isn’t a purpose-built journaling tool, however its features make it perfect for keeping your journaling notes in one safe place. With the ability to keep separate “notebooks”, tag your entries, include pictures, audio and web clipping, Evernote will appeal to journalers who want to include more formats than just text in their entries.

                    Available online within a web browser, and as a stand-alone desktop app, the service also comes with a series of mobile apps covering almost every device available. These allow you to make notes on the go and sync between the mobile and browser versions of the app.

                    For additional features, including text recognition and the ability to collaborate on Notebooks, you can upgrade to Evernote’s premium service, which costs $5 per month.

                    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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