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Help. I Deleted My Homework! How to Recover Lost Files Quickly

Help. I Deleted My Homework! How to Recover Lost Files Quickly

Whether you are taking homework to school, or important business files back to the office, the humble USB thumb drive is a potential lifesaver. But what happens when you accidentally delete your files from the drive? Are they gone forever? Imagine this:

You’ve done your homework–a short story set in your Minecraft world–and it’s due today. You copy the document over to your thumb drive ready to print off at school. You triple check to make sure the file is on your memory stick before heading off to school:

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Picture of the file system showing homework document

    As expected, everything is where it should be. But when you get to school…

    Picture of the Finder window showing that the homework file is missing

      …the file has disappeared.

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      The good news is that just because you cannot see the file, doesn’t mean that the information isn’t still there somewhere. This guide will show you how to use Kroll Ontrack EasyRecovery Home to recover lost files from your thumb drive.

      Before going any further, you will need:

      • Your USB drive.
      • A PC or Mac on which to work.
      • A copy of Kroll Ontrack EasyRecovery Home data recovery tool–you can download a free trial copy from the Kroll Ontrack website.

      The file recovery process will take about 30 minutes depending on how ‘big’ your thumb drive is.

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      1. Plug your thumb drive into the computer and fire up the EasyRecovery software. Click Continue on the welcome splash screen:
        Picture of the Kroll Ontrack file recovery splash screen
        • From the Choose media type screen, select Memory Device and click Continue.
          Picture of the Choose media type selection screen
          • On the Select Volume to Scan screen, you will see a list of removable drives connected to your computer. Select the one that matches your thumb drive. Then click Continue.
            Picture of the Select Volume to Scan screen
            • EasyRecovery needs your permission to perform a low-level disk analysis. When prompted, enter your password and click OK, then Continue.
              Picture of the logon prompt
              • On the Choose Recovery Scenario screen, select Deleted File Recovery and click Continue. In most cases you will not need to adjust any of the other settings on this screen.
                Picture of the Choose Recovery Scenario screen
                • You will now see the Check Your Options screen where you can confirm your settings. If you need to change anything, click Back. Otherwise, click Continue.
                  Picture of the Check Your Options screen
                  • EasyRecovery will now scan your USB drive, looking for deleted files. The process may take a while, so be patient!
                    Picture of the file recovery progress barOnce the scan is complete, click OKPicture of the File Recovery Scan Complete message box
                    • You will now see the Save Your Files screen that will allow you to access the files recovered from your thumb drive. At first, you will probably not recognise many of the files and folders listed.
                      Picture of the Save Your Files screenHowever, you can quickly find what you are looking for simply by typing part of the file name into the search box in the top right-hand corner of the screen. Remember that your lost file was called ‘Minecraft Mischief home work.doc’? Try searching for the text “minecraft”.Picture of the File Recovery screen after searching for minecraft
                        EasyRecovery will now show you a list of deleted files that have the text “minecraft” in the title. The good news is that you’re nearly finished–you just need to get the file back.
                      • Right-click on the correct file (hold down ctrl on your keyboard and then click the mouse) and select Save and open folder…
                        Picture showing how to save the recovered files
                        • To keep things easy, select your Desktop as the place where you want to save the file, then click Save
                          Picture of the save file destination prompt
                          • EasyRecovery will then let you know that the saving process completed successfully. Click OK.

                          And that is pretty much it. A new window will pop up showing you the desktop and a copy of your deleted file.

                          A picture of the successfully recovered file

                            Now you can print out the document, email it to your teacher, or copy it back onto your USB drive. Hopefully all before the deadline expires!

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                            Featured photo credit: PublicDomainPictures via pixabay.com

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                            Last Updated on February 15, 2019

                            7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                            7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

                            Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

                            Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

                            Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

                            So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

                            Joe’s Goals

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                              Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

                              Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

                              Daytum

                                Daytum

                                is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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                                Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

                                Excel or Numbers

                                  If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                                  What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                                  Evernote

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                                    I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                                    Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                                    Access or Bento

                                      If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                                      Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                                      You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                                      Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                                      All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                                      Conclusion

                                      I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                                      What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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