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Finally, a Stunning Music App That Never Plays The Same Thing Twice

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Finally, a Stunning Music App That Never Plays The Same Thing Twice

One website constantly turning out advanced, eye-opening products is Kickstarter. Many of the best products are consistently new programs and tech innovations, including one new music app called Flux. This app lets users listen to an endless stream of original compositions, put together in random order by your phone. A completely new approach to music, this revolutionary music app may have a big effect on what we listen to, and how we listen to it, in the future.

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    Benefits:

    Infinite Combinations

    Flux is a new concept and a new approach to music entirely. The music app takes music loops with similar characteristics and randomly matches them with sound effects, beats, and instruments that could go well together. By never playing the same loops and effects together twice, this unique music app can potentially craft infinite combinations of sound effects and music. This feature could ultimately make Flux a massively appealing music app.

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    Original Lengths

    Since Flux uses many different types of sounds and music loops, it has the potential to obliterate our perceptions of how long a song should be. Endless varying blends could potentially play in all sorts of lengths, both long and short. This is an experimental step, at a time when most songs are 3 to 5 minutes long. This could mean Flux might eventually have a massive impact on the music industry.

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      Infinite Graphic Options

      Flux pairs constantly original compositions, with a highly intelligent graphic system, which also never plays the same visuals twice. This means, to go along with new music, there’s also the potential for infinite graphic presentations.

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      Save Feature

      While the app plays original configurations of graphics and music every second you listen, it also includes a favorite feature, allowing you to save songs. By creating a playlist, users can revisit songs the app created that piqued their interest. This means users can both experience original music, and replay songs they like.

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        Social Media Integration

        This innovative music app also includes several social media integration features. This app makes it easy to share your favorite original music, and helps you connect to other Flux users. In the future, this might even mean you could listen to other user’s favorite songs.

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          Drawbacks:

          Only One Artist

          While the features of the app have the potential to revolutionize the way we think about music, unfortunately so far the app only includes music from one artist. The app’s creator, legendary guitarist Adrian Belew, is so far the only recording artist involved. While Adrian’s accomplishments are far reaching, it would be exciting to see other recording artists contribute. The Kickstarter page alludes to Adrian recording all sorts of instruments and sounds, but the sounds offered by the app could still be limited. There’s no telling where the app might go once it is released, but it would be nice to eventually see compositions from all different genres, cultures, and talents.

          Limited Lyrics

          Another feature Flux is lacking is a wide variety of lyrics to go with the music. This music app’s Kickstarter page hints that new features are likely in the future, but for now Flux only plays a handful of lyrics along with the music. This is something that might lead the app to be more of a cult classic.

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            All in all, this music app shows off some potentially revolutionary features. The ability to always have a new song at your fingertips is exciting, and puts consumers truly in control of their music experience. On the other hand, the limited scope of artists and lyrics, may stop some consumers from taking the plunge. Hopefully, this music app grows the base of sounds that the app uses to create compositions, so a wider demographic of listeners will adopt such a ground breaking approach to music. The app itself is an incredible source for new media and inspiration, and is likely to quickly be a favourite for artists and others looking for inspiration. The ability to constantly expose yourself to completely fresh media is a powerful way to keep new ideas coming. Though the app’s price has not been released, the Kickstarter page suggests that this app is meant for everyone, likely hinting at a low price point. The app will be available in Spring 2015. Explore the Flux app on Kickstarter.

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            Alicia Prince

            A writer, filmmaker, and artist who shares about lifestyle tips and inspirations on Lifehack.

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            Last Updated on November 25, 2021

            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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            How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

            There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

            Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

              What Does Private Browsing Do?

              When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

              For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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              The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

              The Terminal Archive

              While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

              Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

              dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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              Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

              Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

              However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

              Clearing Your Tracks

              Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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              dscacheutil -flushcache

              As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

              Other Browsers and Private Browsing

              Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

              If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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              As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

              Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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