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6 Useful Tools for Easy Viewing and Editing PDF Files You Need To Know

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6 Useful Tools for Easy Viewing and Editing PDF Files You Need To Know

PDF files have become the gold standard of document viewing.

Why? Their main benefit is that they retain their format even when viewed on different computers, using different programs. I’m sure some of you have experienced viewing a word document only to find it’s screwed up because your viewing software couldn’t maintain the formatting.

It’s pretty annoying when that happens, right?

Well, PDFs have become standard nowadays, and lots of PDF software has popped up to take advantage of that. Some of this software is simply for viewing, while others have more utility. What kind of utility? Other PDF programs will let you edit, split, merge, annotate, and more when it comes to PDF files.

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So I took the liberty of compiling some great PDF software choices for whatever purpose you may have. Please take a look and see if you can use any of these great programs for yourself; I’m sure you’ll find something useful.

1. Adobe Reader (For Viewing PDF files)

Adobe-reader-PDF

    Do you simply need to view PDF files? This has got you covered. Adobe reader is free and easy to use, and it even has some annotation features such as text highlight and sticky notes. This makes the viewing experience far better. It may be a bit basic, but if your PDF needs are basic, then this is a worthy consideration.

    2. Ice Cream Split & Merge (For viewing, splitting, and merging PDF files)

    Ever wish you could just combine all those PDF files into one useful one? Then this is what you’re looking for. It can merge, split, and even view PDF files at your convenience, and all for free. Very useful if you use a ton of PDF files that revolve around a similar topic.

    What’s nice about this resource is that unlike free online split and merge tools, you don’t have upload your private files to some unknown server. Everything is done straight from your desktop, which is a great advantage.

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    3. Foxit PhantomPDF Standard 7 (For editing PDF files)

    PDFs are inherently hard to edit. After all, they’re not really word documents; they’re pictures of word documents. So unlike, say, a Word document, you can’t just go in and change the text that easily.

    But that’s where Foxit comes in.

    Foxit comes with a fully flush editing toolkit. You can resize paragraphs, change the font and size of text, insert videos and images, and more. It’s got everything you need for editing PDF files, but it comes at a cost of $89. Luckily there’s a 30-day trial to make sure it’s got what you need, so don’t feel too pressured when you try this tool out.

    4. PDFescape Free PDF Editor (For editing PDF files)

    PDF-Escape

      If the Foxit PDF editor is a bit out of your price range, then PDFescape is your best bet.

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      While not nearly as fully-equiped as Foxit’s PDF editor, it’s a free resource and has the capability to add and remove blocks of text as you see fit. Additionally, you can do other neat things like add images and links as well. Definitely a solid free alternative for editing PDF files.

      So if you aren’t quite ready to invest the cash for a high-end PDF editor like Foxit’s, this will work just fine.

      5. UniPDF (For converting from PDF to word)

      UnifPDF

        Do you need convert your pdf files into word documents? This software does it for free. Once you download it, you simply use the software to convert straight from your desktop—no Internet required.

        Additionally, there’s no size limitations as there are with online PDF converters, meaning even less hassle for those of you with large/many PDF files.

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        6. doPDF (For creating a PDF file)

        If you need to convert your word documents into PDF files, then this will work with no problem. DoPDF is a simple resource that lets you convert both printed documents and regular computer files into PDF files. And unlike many other PDF convertors, this one CAN carry your fonts over and let you define the page size.

        Easy and uncomplicated, this is a solid resource for PDF creation purposes.

        Featured photo credit: MacBook Pro Keyboard Detail/Victor Hanacek via picjumbo.com

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        Ericson Ay Mires

        Ericson Ay Mires specializes in writing copy for self-improvement niches. He helps businesses sell their products with content and copywriting, so they can reach more people and improve their business.

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        Last Updated on November 25, 2021

        How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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        How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

        There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

        Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

          What Does Private Browsing Do?

          When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

          For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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          The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

          The Terminal Archive

          While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

          Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

          dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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          Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

          Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

          However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

          Clearing Your Tracks

          Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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          dscacheutil -flushcache

          As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

          Other Browsers and Private Browsing

          Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

          If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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          As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

          Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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