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Is Your To-Do List a Mess? Try These 6 Steps To Make It Useful Again

Is Your To-Do List a Mess? Try These 6 Steps To Make It Useful Again

Has your to-do list lost its oomph? Is it more overwhelming than effective?

Have no fear!

This article is going to help you make the most of your to-do list so you can make the most of what you want to achieve.

Pick the Right Medium

Whether you use sticky notes or a fancy app on your smart phone, there’s no wrong medium. It is important, however, that you pick the medium that’s right for you. Lacey M. of Falmouth, MA is a veteran Post-It Note list maker but when she’s on the go, she uses ColorNote, an iPhone app.

Begin With the End in Mind

What’s your desired end state? Is there something you want to achieve or accomplish? If you have no end result in mind your to-do list may look more like a wish list. Think about your desired state for a few minutes. Perhaps you want to write a book or double your income or generate more sales revenue or find five new clients.

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Break it Down

With your end result clearly stated, what tasks or steps are necessary to help you move forward? Write them down in order of priority. For example, if your end result is to write a book, your high level to-do list may look something like this:

  1. Create a chapter outline
  2. Create 3-5 points to cover for each chapter
  3. Create a time plan
  4. Find an accountability partner
  5. Complete first draft
  6. Edit book
  7. Revise book
  8. Decide how to publish book
  9. Traditional publishing – create and send out query letters
  10. Self publishing – determine publishing platform
  11. Publish book
  12. Celebrate

Find a To-Do List System

You may have multiple to-do lists. That’s okay. Most of us do. Finding a to-do list system that works for you is a key ingredient that helps you manage your to-do’s rather than having your to-do’s manage you.

Timothy Barchard, 7th degree black belt and owner of a Professional Martial Arts Academy, uses the PAR3 system and on a daily basis writes down:

  • 3 things he must get done
  • 3 things he should get done
  • 3 things he would like to get done

“Without it,” Barchard states, “I get nothing done.”

I use Brendon Burchard’s One Page Productivity Planner, which helps me identify:

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  • Top 3 Priorities or Projects for the week
  • 3-5 things that must get done for each project by the end of the week
  • Person she must reach out to during the week
  • People she’s waiting on to deliver or respond to her by the end of the week
  • #1 most important thing that must get done during the week, no matter what

In addition to the one page productivity planner, I prints out my daily calendar for the work week and staple it behind my completed planner. Scheduled meetings must be in alignment with my top 3 priorities for the week. Everything gets done and my to-do list is manageable and do-able.

At work, Laurie M. of Londonderry, NH, divides things into “big rocks” and “little rocks” and she writes them in her daily planner. She explains that “big rocks equal what must get done today. Little rocks equal what she would like to get done today but no fire will be created if it doesn’t get done.”

Cross it Off

Most people want to feel productive. I bet you do, too. Crossing off a completed task on your to-do list creates a sense of accomplishment. Maureen M. of Derry, NH loves to “cross things off with a pink highlighter.” Lynn S. of Tewksbury, MA enjoys feeling productive when she crosses things off her to-do list. And some people will add something they did to their to-do list just so they can cross it off.

Stay Focused

One thing that will derail nearly every to-do list is either a lack of focus or your latest and greatest shiny object distraction. One way to regain control of your to-list is to simply fill in the blanks each day:

The most important thing I need to do for my personal life today is

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_______________________________

The most important thing I need to do for my professional life today is

_______________________________

The most important thing I need to do for my social life today is

_______________________________

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The most important thing I need to do for my physical well being today is

_______________________________

The most important thing I need to do for my spiritual life today is

_______________________________

Now it’s your turn. I’d love to hear what works for you…How do you keep your to-do list from running amok?

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Last Updated on January 25, 2021

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

Perfectionism sounds like a first world problem, but it stifles creative minds. Having a great idea but doubting your ability to execute it can leave you afraid to just complete and publish it. Some of the most successful inventors failed, but they kept going in pursuit of perfection. On the other end of the spectrum, perfectionism can hinder people when they spend too much time seeking recognition, gathering awards and wasting time patting themselves on the back. Whatever your art, go make good art and don’t spend time worrying that your idea isn’t perfect enough and certainly don’t waste time coming up with a new idea because you’re still congratulating yourself for the last one.

1. Remember, perfection is subjective.

If you’re worried about achieving perfectionism with any single project so much that you find yourself afraid to just finish it, then you aren’t being productive. Take a hard look at your work, edit and revise, then send it our into the world. If the reviews aren’t the greatest, learn from the feedback so you can improve next time.

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2. Procrastination masquerades itself as perfectionism.

People who procrastinate aren’t always lazy or trying to get out of doing something. Many who procrastinate do so because perfectionism is killing their productivity, telling them that if they wait a better idea will come to them.

3. Recognize actions that waste time.

Artists and all creative people need time to incubate; those ideas will only grow when properly watered, but if you’re not engaging in an activity that will help foster creativity, you might just be wasting time. Remember to do everything with purpose, even relaxing.

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4. Don’t discriminate against your worth.

No one is actually perfect. We often have tremendous ideas or write things that move people emotionally, but no one attains that final state of being perfect. So, don’t get down if your second idea isn’t as good as your first—or vice versa. Perfectionists tend to be the toughest critics of their work, so don’t criticize yourself. You are not your work no matter how good or how bad.

5. Stress races your heart and freezes your innovation.

Stress is a cyclic killer that perfectionists know well because that same system that engages and causes your palms to sweat over a great idea is the same system that kicks in and worries you that you’re not good enough. Perfectionism means striving for that ultimate level, and stress can propel you forward excitedly or leave you shaking in fear of the next step.

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6. Meeting deadlines beats waiting for perfect work.

Don’t let your fear of failure prevent you from meeting your deadline. Perfection is subjective and if you’re wasting time or procrastinating, you should just finish the job and learn from any mistakes. Being productive means completing work. You shouldn’t try for months or even years to perfect one project when you can produce projects that improve over time.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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