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Last Updated on February 17, 2021

How to Compartmentalize to Live a Stress-Free and Successful Life

How to Compartmentalize to Live a Stress-Free and Successful Life
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Wouldn’t it be wonderful not to feel stressed and be present in each moment, so you can truly focus and deal with whatever life throws at you?

Being able to compartmentalize is one way to get to a place where you feel more in control of your life. It allows you to divide up the tasks, responsibilities and thoughts you have into different areas, so they don’t overlap and fight for your attention all the time.

You can then sort all of your inflight tasks and projects, and put them all into various virtual boxes allowing you to work on only one thing at a time.

Compartmentalizing helps stress management as it can reduce anxiety and tension. It’s an approach that is commonly used to avoid mental discomfort and helps with the conflicting views of those around us every day.,

To practice compartmentalizing, there are various techniques and approaches you can do this in your mind and practically through how you organize your life.

You can then build up rules, habits and approaches to reduce stress and become more in control.

1. Practice Compartmentalizing Through Visualization

Starting to visualize your journey towards a long term goal or vision helps you to begin compartmentalize.

One approach is to visualize yourself going on a journey in a car taking on board whats going to help you achieve your goals and not taking on board what isn’t serving you.

Let me explain:

Any issues or stress in your life as you come alongside them, move them into another car or house that’s not on your journey or isn’t on your journey yet.

For example, you have a big pitch coming up at work, but it’s weeks away, and it’s already causing you anxiety. Place it in a house that’s much further up the road as you shouldn’t be worrying about it yet. Then focus hard on the house telling yourself it’s okay to have it there and you will deal with it when you’re ready. You then continue on your journey.

Keep going on this journey, moving each dominant thought into another car or house until you feel you have a place for each of your main worries or thoughts. Anything that you don’t want on your journey at all, say no to it and remove it.

You’ll soon feel more in control and calmer the more you practice this approach.

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2. Focus on ONE Thing at a Time

This may sound obvious, but knowing you should focus on one thing at a time versus actually doing it are two very different things.

Multitasking doesn’t work and impacts your focus and productivity.

Pick one task. It doesn’t matter if it’s large or small, then set a timer which is a little promise to yourself that you won’t be distracted during this time. Entirely focus on that task until the timer is finished.

Use a Google timer, a stopwatch or an app. It doesn’t matter as long as it has an alarm once complete.

Practising this which is named Deep Work by Cal Newport in the book called Deep Work is the ability to focus without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. The more you practice this skill, the better you’ll become.

To train up your focus muscle, join the free Fast-Track Class – Overcoming Distractions. In this 30-minute session, you’ll learn how to work even when you’re surrounded by distractions. Join the free session today!

3. Recognize When You’re Going within Yourself

You may be working on a task at work when something triggers an adverse reaction in you like a comment from a work colleague, or you’re reminded of a particular situation that impacted your confidence in the past.

At this moment, don’t go within yourself.

Practice recognizing when this happens, so that you can accept it in that moment, then let it pass.

You can literally talk to yourself, ideally in your head if you’re not on your own saying, I recognize this, but now I’m moving on as it doesn’t serve me.

4. Write it Down

No matter how focused you’re and well practised with compartmentalization techniques, thoughts and ideas will still pop into your head.

To prevent these thoughts from repeating themselves, write them down by keeping a small note pad with you at all times.

Just a word or two is needed so not to distract you from what you’re currently working on. You can then move on with what you’re doing, knowing you’ve recognized this thought.

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By doing this, you stop the repeating thought in your head by acknowledging it with the action of note-taking.

5. Simplify What You’re Working on at Any One Time

At work or at home, some requests or projects can at times seem overwhelming.

When the ask is large or complex, it’s hard to know where to start. This feeling of being overwhelmed triggers stress, and you naturally start doubting yourself. You think how you can possibly get this done with everything else going on in your life.

How do you solve this?

You simplify everything. This doesn’t mean the request has just become simple and easy to do, but you break it down into more straightforward tasks by compartmentalizing them.

If a project has multiple tasks, group them into different compartments or areas to break it down and name these areas. Then pick an area and move through each task one by one. If a task is too hard or complex, break it down again into smaller tasks until you can do them.

Focus on one area at a time. You’ll never complete all your tasks in one go, so why worry about them? Each time you complete a task, you’re one step closer from completing them all.

6. Focus on What Only You Can Control

Distracting thoughts or the actions of those around can often throw you off course either physically or mentally.

Being able to compartmentalize allows you to focus on what you can control at that moment and not let others move you into a stressful place or distract you.

Any external triggers like a driver with road rage, a rude pedestrian or a rude comment from a work colleague, remind yourself you can control how you can react at that moment.

One technique to help with moving on is showing gratitude in these situations. Sounds unusual, but let me explain:

A rude pedestrian is crossing the road at the wrong time, which causes you to slam your breaks on and get stuck at a red light. Rather than let the stress build-up, simply say thank you for doing that as this has helped me improve my focus for the journey ahead. It may have even prevented something more serious from happening further on in your journey.

By merely saying thank you and seeing the positive in the situation, it immediately reduces your stress levels and allows the situation to pass by.

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7. Group Everything You Do Under Your Goals

Like the visualization technique where you take yourself on a journey in your mind and grouping everything into compartments, you can do the same with your physical actions.

For every action you plan to take, align it with a goal you’ve set for yourself whether that’s for work, personal or relationships. By doing this, you’re compartmentalizing in the physical world to allow you to stay focused and in control.

Compartmentalizing your goals also makes sure you’re working on what is bringing you the most value and getting you to your goals faster.

Now with this approach in place, if you’re tempted to work on something that doesn’t align with your goals, you can say no to it.

8.Create Time Barriers

Creating time barriers has multiple advantages to managing stress, your workload, and how productive you’re.

Designating time for yourself, when there are no work distractions, social media or any other type of distraction that might elevate stress levels is vital for managing life in general. Get this free guide End Distractions And Find Your Focus and learn how to do just that. With this guide, you’ll figure out how to create time barriers easily so you can always stay productive. Grab your free guide here.

Everyone will have different times of the day when you can do this, but for example, blocking out 6 am – 7 am every morning for exercise, reading time or meditation is a fantastic way to start the day.

To do this, you need to do two things:

Plan your week every week and place this me-time in your diary and ideally what you want to do during this time, so you don’t waste it. Then share with those you’re close too when you’re doing this and why. Be open about the why as they then can help you make sure you keep these times slots free.

9. Set Rules for Yourself

Look at the behaviors that could create stress, lack of focus or put yourself in situations that don’t serve you. Then create rules to either prevent you from acting this way or help you recognise the situations that make you behave this way.

Sounds like being back at school, but here are some examples:

You only work on a particular type of work between set hours as that’s when you’re most productive. Or between the hours of 9 am and 11 am on a Saturday, you do nothing but play with your children, no email, jobs around the house as the two don’t mix well.

Creating these rules for yourself quickly turn them into habits and then reminders are no longer needed.

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10. Say Goodbye to Emails

Having 24/7 access to work emails can negatively impact your ability to compartmentalize. They’re a stress inducers and never let you truly relax and focus on your home life once away from work.

The one sure way to fix this is once you’ve finished work is stop doing the Adhoc checks of your inbox. You may feel like you’re making it easier for yourself by checking email in the evenings, but the later in the evening you check, the longer it will take you to switch off and have a relaxing evening and peaceful sleep.

Set a deadline for when you’ll check your emails for the last time that day, ideally when you’re still at the office. You must make sure you have a few hours left in the evening, so you can say goodbye to emails until the next day!

You can also turn off notifications on your mobile to prevent the temptation to check your inbox. It only takes a few clicks to turn these on and off. If you can’t turn off notifications, then leave your mobile in a different room each evening, so you’re not tempted,

11. Recognize What’s Really Important vs What’s Urgent

Whether you love your job or hate it, work can spill into other aspects of your life at home and on holiday in some cases.

Even when you’re working, there is a constant stream of requests coming your way, and knowing the difference between what’s urgent and what’s important is critical when it comes to managing stress levels.

For example, emails are nearly always a request to respond with some information or perform some action or response. These are often treated as urgent because over the years, we’ve become accustomed to always responding to emails quickly.

For the majority of the time, emails may seem urgent, but few of them are important. Recognize what’s important versus urgent and then work on those important emails first as these will have a more significant impact.

When a request comes in, whether that an email or any other request for your time, ask yourself do I need to respond to this now. Can it wait, is it more important than what I’m doing at this moment?

You can also put yourself in the requester’s shoes and think if they don’t get a response for another day, will that make much of a difference?

The Bottom Line

To reduce stress and be more present with those you love, practicing these techniques is critical. The more you practice them, the quicker they become ingrained as habits, and your overwhelming feeling of control will increase.

Compartmentalizing is a well-practiced approach to manage what life throws at you in a more manageable way that works for you.

The more control and focus you can create in the present moment will result in not only less stress, but improved productivity and more quality time.

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Be prepared to adapt these approaches for your own situation, but the principles and expected results should remain the same.

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Featured photo credit: Jacky Chiu via unsplash.com

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Ben Willmott

Productivity and Project Management blogger for at work and at home

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Last Updated on August 4, 2021

How to Focus and Concentrate Better to Boost Productivity

How to Focus and Concentrate Better to Boost Productivity
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We live in a world of massive distraction. No matter where you are today, there is always going to be distractions. Your colleagues talking about their latest date, notification messages popping up on your screens, and not just your mobile phone screens. And even if you try to find a quiet place, there will always be someone with a mobile device that is beeping and chirping.

With all these distractions, it is incredibly difficult to concentrate on anything for very long. Something will distract you and that means you will find it very difficult to focus on anything.

So how to focus better? How to concentrate and produce work that lifts us and takes us closer towards achieving our outcomes?

Here’re 4 essential ways to help you focus:

1. Get Used to Turning off Your Devices

Yes, I know this one is hard for most people. We believe our devices are so vital to our lives that the thought of turning them off makes us feel insecure. The reality is they are not so vital and the world is not going to end within the next thirty minutes.

So turn them off. Your battery will thank you for it. More importantly though is when you are free from your mobile distraction addiction, you will begin to concentrate more on what needs to get done.

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You do not need to do this for very long. You could set a thirty-minute time frame for being completely mobile free. Let’s say you have an important piece of work to complete by lunchtime today. Turn off your mobile device between 10 am and 11 am and see what happens.

If you have never done this before, you will feel very uncomfortable at first. Your brain will be fighting you. It will be telling you all sorts of horror stories such as a meteorite is about to hit earth, or your boss is very angry and is trying to contact you. None of these things is true, but your brain is going to fight you. Prepare yourself for the fight.

Over time, as you do this more frequently, you will soon begin to find your brain fights you less and less. When you do turn on your device after your period of focused work and discover that the world did not end, you have not lost an important customer and all you have are a few email newsletters, a confirmation of an online order you made earlier and a text message from your mum asking you to call about dinner this weekend, you will start to feel more comfortable turning things off.

2. Create a Playlist in Your Favourite Music Streaming App

Many of us listen to music using some form of music streaming service, and it is very easy to create our own playlists of songs. This means we can create playlists for specific purposes.

Many years ago, when I was just starting to drive, there was a trend selling driving compilation tapes and CDs. The songs on these tapes and CDs were uplifting driving music songs. Songs such as C W McCall’s Convoy theme and the Allman Brothers Band’s, Jessica. They were great songs to drive to and helped to keep us awake and focused while we were driving.

Today, we can create playlists to help us to focus on our work. Choose non-vocal music that has a low tempo. Music from artists such as Ben Böhmer, Ilan Bluestone or Andrew Bayer has the perfect tempo.

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Whenever you want to go into deep, focused work, listen to that playlist. What happens is your brain soon associates when you listen to the playlist you created with focused work and it’s time to concentrate on what it is you want to do.

3. Have a Place to Go to When You Need to Concentrate

If you eat, surf online and read at your desk, you will find your desk a very distracting place to do your work. One way to get your brain to understand it is focused work time is, to use the same place each time for just focused work.

This could be a quiet place in your office, or it could be a special coffee shop you use specifically for focused work. Again, what you are doing is associating an environment with focus.

Just as with having a playlist to listen to when you want to concentrate, having a physical place that accomplishes the same thing will also put you in the right frame of mind to be more focused.

When you do find the right place to do your focused work, then only do focused work there. Never surf, never do any online shopping. Just do your work and then leave. You want to be training your brain to associate focused work with that environment and nothing else.

If you need to make a phone call, respond to an email or message, then go outside and do it. From now on, this place is your special working place and that is all you use it for.

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Every morning, I do fifteens minutes of meditation. Each time, I sit down to do my meditation, I use the same music playlist and the same place. As soon as I put my earphones in and sit down in this place, my mind immediately knows it is meditation time and I become relaxed and focused almost immediately. I have trained my brain over a few months to associate a sound and a place with relaxed, thoughtful meditation. It works.

4. Get up and Move

We humans have a limited attention span. How long you can stay focused for depends on your own personal makeup. It can range from between twenty minutes to around two hours. With practice, you can stay focused for longer, but it takes time and it takes a lot of practice.

When you do find yourself being unable to concentrate any longer, get up from where you are and move. Go for a walk, move around and get some air. Do something completely different from what you were doing when you were concentrating.

If you were writing a report in front of a screen, get away from your screens and look out the window and appreciate the view. Take a walk in the local park, or just walk around your office. You need to give your brain completely different stimuli.

Your brain is like a muscle. There is only so much it can do before it fatigues. If you are doing some focused work in Photoshop and then switch to surfing the internet, you are not giving your brain any rest. You are still using many of the same parts of your brain.

It’s like doing fifty pushups and then immediately trying to do bench presses. Although you are doing a different exercise, you are still exercising your chest. What you need to be doing to build up superior levels of concentrated focus is, in a sense, do fifty pushups and then a session of squats. Now you are exercising your chest and then your legs. Two completely different exercises.

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Do the same with your brain. Do focused visual work and then do some form of movement with a different type of work. Focused visual work followed by a discussion with a colleague about another unrelated piece of work, for example.

The Bottom Line

It is not difficult to train your brain to become better at concentrating and focusing, but you do need to exercise deliberate practice. You need to develop the intention to focus and be very strict with yourself.

Set time aside in your calendar and make sure you tell your colleagues that you will be ‘off the grid’ for a couple of hours. With practice and a little time, you will soon find yourself being able to resist temptations and focus better.

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Featured photo credit: Wenni Zhou via unsplash.com

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