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Top 10 Interviewing Tips to Hire the Best Talent

Top 10 Interviewing Tips to Hire the Best Talent

Finding great people to hire can be difficult, even when you have a lot of applicants for every job. There are ways to make the process simpler, faster and ensure you get the best talent, every time. Here are 10 great tips to follow when interviewing, making offers and on-boarding candidates.

1. Have the right interviewers

If you don’t have the right people interviewing, you can’t make the best hiring decision. The most important person in the process is the hiring manager. He or she needs to be involved each step of the way and should be one of the first interviewers. If the potential manager does not feel the candidate is qualified or will be a good fit for the team and the organization, find out early, to save time and money and protect your employer’s brand. A candidate who doesn’t meet their prospective manager until late in interviews is unable to get a clear view of what is needed in the job, and might fail to put his or her best foot forward. Other people who should interview candidates include a representative from Human Resources or the recruitment team, and potential clients.

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2. Ask for specific examples of past experience

The best way to find out how someone will handle a situation in the future is to find out how they handled it in the past. This is an interview technique called Behaviour Based Interviewing.

Make sure every candidate interviewed is asked the same questions, and that they provide the situation, the problem, the solution and outcome. It’s a simple process but very effective.

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3. Do panel interviews to get objective data and save time

Interviews are time consuming and expensive. A great option is to conduct interviews via video. If not, try to minimize the amount of trips a candidate has to make by having all the interviewers see them at once in a panel. In this approach, there are a set number of questions, and each member of the panel takes turns asking them. It’s more efficient than having the candidate meet people one after the other and repeating their story over and over. Panel interviews also ensure everyone hears the same information at the same time.

4. Ask for clarity on any red flags

Sometimes a candidate will say things or put things on their resume that need clarification. Whenever you come across something that you need more information about, either because it’s unclear or it seems at odds with what you’ve learned about the candidate so far, ask questions. A red flag is anything that makes you weary of a candidate. Instead of dismissing the flag right away, or using your instinct to decline them, find out more about the matter.

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5. Review interview notes immediately and make a decision

The benefits of doing panel interviews can’t be overestimated. Everyone in the room hears the candidate answer the same questions, although each interviewer will interpret answers a little differently. Being together, either in person or on a phone or video conference, will allow the team to review the candidate’s answers and their thoughts immediately, and to make a decision about whether to proceed with the person to next stage or not. By discussing the candidate immediately after an interview, the comments are fresh in everyone’s memories, and positives and concerns can be debated and a consensus reached.

6. Decline candidate if not hiring

If after interviewing a candidate you decide you won’t hire them, do the right thing and decline them. You may wait a day or two, so the candidate will feel they have been properly assessed, as they might not be familiar with the efficiency of panel interviews and how quickly decisions can be made. With a phone call, let them know you won’t be considering them further. Ensure someone from the panel calls the candidate and can provide some meaningful feedback on why they are not moving forward in the selection process. The typical approach is to wait until a finalist has accepted an offer before declining candidates, but only those who are seriously being considered and would be offered the job if the preferred candidate declines should be kept in play. Everyone else needs to be declined so they can move on, and you can too.

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7. Make a verbal conditional offer to your top candidate

When you have decided on the best person for the job, call them and talk through your offer. Ask if they have questions. Find out any concerns. Send them the offer if they say they will accept or want to review it. Make sure they know it’s conditional while you contact references.

8. Ask for references if they accept the offer

When a candidate accepts a conditional offer, let them know the rest of the process and how long it will take. They might be involved in other interviews and you don’t want to lose a candidate at this point. Find out who their references are and contact them right away.

9. Complete thorough reference checks

Today there are a variety of ways to conduct reference checks, including by email. Choose the right process for your organization, and move quickly. People providing references are generally doing a favour for a past colleague or employee, and you should keep the questions brief and to the point. If you need clarification on anything that comes up in a reference check, be sure you can get it. Ask for phone numbers to follow up, even in an online process.

10. Welcome the new hire

Once the candidate has accepted the job, make the process of welcoming them easy and pleasant. No one wants to arrive for a new job without the tools they need, or no one there to show them around. Send them a welcome note before they start, ideally from the manager, and then don’t communicate further with them until day one. Over-communicating with a new hire before they start can be frustrating for them and wastes time. All the paperwork and information you need can be gathered once they come on board.

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Last Updated on December 2, 2020

7 Reasons Why Quitting Facebook Now Is Good for Your Future

7 Reasons Why Quitting Facebook Now Is Good for Your Future

For the past 100 years or so, there have been huge improvements in communication. From letters to phone calls to text messages to video calls to social networks. Following all these improvements, one of the biggest inventions of the 21st century was founded in 2004[1], and it started to spread like wildfire, first in the US and then around the world. Now, quitting Facebook has become nearly unheard of.

There are more than 1 billion monthly active Facebook users. Although initially it aimed to bring all people together for the sake of connecting, the effects of Facebook on masses became a huge debate after it gained so much popularity, with some even suggesting you deactivate your account.

The advantages of social media and its ability to connect us to people around the world are well known. Now, it’s time to dive into the ways Facebook affects your productivity and why you should ultimately consider quitting Facebook.

1. Facebook Allows You to Waste Time

While being on Facebook and scrolling through the news feed, many active users are not aware of the time they actually spend on viewing others’ life events or messaging with Facebook messenger. It has become so addictive that many even feel obliged to like or comment on anything that is shared.

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You might think of the time spent on Facebook as your free time, though you are not aware that you can spend the same time taking care of yourself, learning something new, or doing your daily tasks.

2. It Can Decrease Motivation

By seeing someone else’s continuous posts about the parties they went to or friends they see frequently, you might feel insecure about yourself if your own posts are not as impressive as the ones in your news feed.

However, there is rarely such a thing as going out every day or having amazing vacations every year. Unfortunately, though, we internalize the posts we see and create a picture in our minds of how others are living.

One study found that “participants who used Facebook most often had poorer trait self-esteem, and this was mediated by greater exposure to upward social comparisons on social media”[2].

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Basically, when we see posts depicting lives we consider “better” than ours, our self-esteem takes a hit. As many of us are doing this for hours at a time, you can imagine the toll it’s taking on our mental health. Therefore, if you want to raise your self-esteem, quitting Facebook may be a good idea.

3. You Use Energy on People You Don’t Care About

Look at the number of friends you have on Facebook. How many of them are really good friends? How many of the friend requests you get are real people or your actual acquaintances?

You have to admit that you have people on Facebook who are not related to you and some you barely know, but who still comments on their photos or offer a like now and again. Basically, instead of offering your time and energy to the genuinely rewarding relationships in your life, you’re spending it on people you don’t really care about.

4. Facebook Feeds You Useless Information

It is one thing to read newspapers or magazines in order to get information, but it is an entirely different thing to be faced with false news, trends, and celebrity updates through continuous posts. I bet one of the things that you will not miss after quitting Facebook is the bombardment of information that seems to have no effect on your life whatsoever.

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5. It Damages Your Communication Skills

When is the last time you actually hung out in real life with your friends, relatives, or colleagues? Because of the social media that is supposed to help us communicate, we forget about real communication, and therefore, have difficulties communicating effectively in real life. This negatively affects our relationships at home, work, or in our social circles.

6. You Get Manipulated

One of the biggest problems of Facebook is its influence on people’s creativity. Although it is assumed to be a free social media site, which let’s you to share almost anything you want, you have this tendency to want to get more likes[3].

In order to get more likes, you must work very hard on your shared posts, trying to make it funny, creative, or clever, while you could spend the same time doing something that genuinely improves your creativity. After quitting Facebook, you’ll be amazed at all the creative hobbies you have time to develop.

7. It Takes Over Your Life

The marketing strategy of Facebook is quite clear. Its creators want you to spend as much time as possible on the site. While working on their posts and choosing which pictures to share, many people actually try to be someone else. This often means they end up being isolated from the real world and their true selves.

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It is possible to put the same time and energy toward becoming a better version of yourself instead of faking it. Why not try it by quitting Facebook?

Final Thoughts

There are many reasons to try quitting Facebook. By knowing how it may be impacting your productivity and mental health, you can search for motivation to get off social media and back into your real life.

These points will guide you in seeing what your life would be like if you were to delete your account. Leaving Facebook doesn’t sound so bad after all, does it?

More on How to Quit Social Media

Featured photo credit: Brett Jordan via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] The Guardian: A brief history of Facebook
[2] Psychology of Popular Media Culture: Social comparison, social media, and self-esteem.
[3] Better by Today: Do Facebook ‘Likes’ Mean You’re Liked?

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