Advertising
Advertising

This List Of 15 Big-Shot Executives Who Wake Up Early Will Make You Think Twice About Sleeping In

This List Of 15 Big-Shot Executives Who Wake Up Early Will Make You Think Twice About Sleeping In

Waking up early has become common advice in self-improvement circles. After all, it makes sense. Waking up early gives you time where you can focus and get things done before dealing with pesky distractions. As you rise before the majority, you’ll find a strange sense of tranquility that motivates and inspires you. But why take my word for it? Read on to see how some of the most powerful men and women spend their mornings.

1. GE CEO Jeff Immelt

ge-ceo-jeff-immelt-headshot-500px

    Jeff Immelt has a rock solid morning routine. He rises at 5:30AM and does cardio while watching and reading the latest news. This allows him to get his exercise in (which is important for a lot of reasons), all while consuming information that will contribute to decisions he will make throughout the day.

    2. Xerox CEO Ursula Burns

    Xerox CEO Ursula Burns

      Ursula wakes up at 5:15AM and immediately gets started on her email. She also spends an hour in the morning on personal training. Diligence, hard work, and being an early riser all have contributed to her earning the #22 spot on Forbes’ Power Woman list.

      3. Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz

      Starbucks-Howard_Schultz

        Of course you know Starbucks. There’s one practically every block, there’s always a crazy line, the environment is incredibly hip, and everyone working there seems to be amazingly happy. Who’s behind all this? Howard Schultz.

        Advertising

        In order to pull all this off, Schultz starts out early – getting to the headquarters at around 6 or 6:30 AM. Before that, he fits in a workout or even a bikeride.

        4. Fiat and Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne

        MarchionneDec2010__mid

          Bringing Chrysler back from the dead as American car companies struggled to stay afloat, requires time and skill. Sergio Marchionne did it by starting early – he wakes up at 3:30AM every morning. This also allows him to interact with those in European timezones.

          5. PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi

          indra_nooyi_OurLeadership

            Indra Nooyi heads up PepsiCo – one of the largest beverage companies in the United States. She gets her day started at 4AM and is at the office by 7AM.

            6. Former General Motors’ CEO Dan Akerson

            danakerman

              Dan Akerson would wake up every morning around 4:30AM in order to stay in contact with GM companies overseas. This allowed him to help resurrect General Motors.

              Advertising

              7. Hain Celestial Group CEO Irwin Simon

              image (1)

                Irwin Simon may be the king of morning productivity. He begins at 5AM to keep in touch with overseas offices. Then he exercises, walks the dog, and prays all before he arrives at work. Sometimes he fits a meeting in there, too.

                8. Square CEO Jack Dorsey

                jackdorsey

                  Co-founder and co-creator of Twitter. CEO of Square. Wall Street Journal’s 2012 Innovator of the Year. A net worth of more than 2 billion. All of this describes Jack Dorsey, an entreprenuer based out of Silicon Valley. How does he manage to do all of this?

                  Well for one, he wakes up every morning at 5:30AM to meditate and go for a 6 mile jog. This gives him a headstart that allows him to push above the competition.

                  9. Richard Branson, founder and chairman of the Virgin Group

                  richardbranson

                    Richard Branson is sixty years old and still going strong. He wakes up at 6:00AM every morning to get a nice jog in before he starts his day. As a founder of more than 400 companies (under the Virgin moniker), it only makes sense to look to him for wisdom.

                    Advertising

                    10. Apple CEO Tim Cook

                    tim cook

                      Coworkers describe Tim Cook as being first in the office and the last out. He wakes up around 4:30AM. Not surprising for the man running the world’s most valuable company.

                      11. Disney CEO Bob Iger

                      BOB IGER

                        Bob Iger is CEO of Disney, perhaps the most known name in entertainment. In order to keep the company pushing out some of the greatest films he wakes up at 4:45AM. From there he’s off to the gym at 5, and at the office by 6.

                        12. Starwood Hotels CEO Frits Van Paasschen

                        Frits van Paasschen, president and CEO Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, speaks during the Reuters 2011 Global Fashion and Luxury Summit in New York

                          Frits Van Paaschen runs one of the largest hotel chains in the world. He’s running at 5:50AM and starts working by 6:30.

                          13. Brooklyn Nets CEO Brett Yormark

                          Advertising

                          image

                            You’ve got to be on your game as one of the youngest CEO’s in the NBA. Brett Yorkmark does this by waking up at 3:30AM to get to the office by 4:30.

                            14. GM CEO Mary Barra

                            marrybarra

                              Taking the reigns of GM as the first female CEO at the company, Mary Barra has to be at peak performance. She’s at the office by 6AM to get started on her day.

                              15. Former president George W. Bush

                              georgewbush

                                He’s not a business CEO, but he did become the most powerful man in the world. Even if you don’t agree with his political views, his work ethic is most definitely present. George W. Bush was known for being at the oval office by 6:45AM and holding meetings as early as sunrise.

                                Convinced you should become an early riser? Check out this article for some tips on how to wake up happy.

                                More by this author

                                21 Life Changing Autobiographies From Around The World Miraculous Photographer Erik Johansson Shows Us Behind The Scenes (Which Are Equally Miraculous) 8 Things Highly Motivated People Do Differently The Best 5 Music Apps You Won’t Want To Miss 7 Lessons About Success We Can Learn From The $500 Million Man

                                Trending in Productivity

                                1 10 Practical Ways to Improve Time Management Skills 2 The Ultimate Morning Routine for Success of Highly Successful People 3 10 Good Habits to Have in Life to Be More Successful 4 Powerful Daily Routine Examples for a Healthier Life 5 How to Increase Willpower and Be Mentally Tough

                                Read Next

                                Advertising
                                Advertising
                                Advertising

                                Last Updated on March 23, 2021

                                Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

                                Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

                                One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

                                The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

                                You need more than time management. You need energy management

                                1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

                                How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

                                Advertising

                                I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

                                I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

                                2. Determine your “peak hours”

                                Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

                                Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

                                Advertising

                                My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

                                In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

                                Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

                                3. Block those high-energy hours

                                Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

                                Advertising

                                Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

                                If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

                                That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

                                There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

                                Advertising

                                Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

                                Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

                                Read Next