Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on February 3, 2021

10 Best Note-Taking Apps to Keep Your Life Organized

10 Best Note-Taking Apps to Keep Your Life Organized

Note-taking apps have become especially popular because of their ability to make us more efficient. However, like pretty much every other mobile tool we have, there’s a myriad of these apps available now, and you need to make a choice.

Not sure where to start? We’ve got you covered! For your consideration, here are the 10 best note-taking apps on the market:

1. Evernote

Evernote screenshot

    Evernote has continued to be the leader as far as note-taking apps are concerned. The cross-platform app makes it easy to take notes and clip articles from the Internet, with a collection of features and add-ons that make the entire noting process as seamless as possible.

    The biggest benefit of Evernote, of course, is the fact that it supports pretty much any file format — PowerPoint, PDF, and many more. What’s more, if you add a Google Docs link, the app even creates a Google Drive file and changes the URL to the doc’s name.

    You also get a scanner on the app, which helps to scan documents and serves as a great alternative to photocopying. The app even makes it possible to save web articles stuck behind a paywall for later use.

    However, there are also some cons: Evernote doesn’t provide enough space for organization, and since it doesn’t support Markdown, it could slow your writing down. You could also end up paying a pretty penny to enjoy service to the app.

    Available on iOS | Android

    2. OneNote

    OneNote app screenshot

      OneNote is a free, cross-platform note-taking app from Microsoft, and it is among the forerunners in note-taking apps, giving Evernote some competition.

      OneNote is completely free, so that’s one less thing to worry about. Since it’s capable of all Evernote can do, without the accompanying cost, that’s certainly a big plus. Also, it provides more formatting options and a greater editing spectrum than Evernote.

      Advertising

      Sadly, the same issues that befall Evernote are present here as well; organization is subpar, and the interface isn’t great. Even with all the premium features it has available, these issues could sour the experience.

      Available on iOS | Android

      Read more about the difference between Evernote and OneNote here: Evernote vs OneNote: Which Improves Your Productivity Better?

      3. Apple Notes

      Apple Notes screenshot

        If you don’t have a device running on a software designed by Apple Inc., then there’s no need to stick around for this number on the list. If you do use an Apple device, however, you’ll probably be able to attest to the awesome formatting and organization features that this note-taking app provides.

        Apple Notes is entirely free, and it makes it possible to edit cross-platform via a web browser, so PC users can still take advantage of it. You also get nested lists of hierarchical folders, and accessibility across all your Apple products.

        Sadly, the lack of a hybrid Markdown is a con here — that and the app’s unavailability on other platforms.

        Available on iOS

        4. Bear

        Bear note-taking app

          Bear provides an excellent user experience, as well as the required support for Markdown — which, in a sense, puts it up there with our overall best note-taking apps like Evernote and OneNote. The interface is also intuitive, and the organization system makes for a great experience overall.

          Of course, the hybrid Markdown editor has to be perhaps the biggest benefit of this. Bear formats all text as you type, meaning you don’t need to wait to see what your Markdowns will look like after writing. You also get a nifty archive feature here, which takes a note out of organization and search without deleting it.

          Advertising

          Sadly, not everyone is able to make use of the app yet, as it’s still just available on macOS and iOS operating systems

          Available on iOS

          5. Standard Notes

          Standard notes app screenshot

            Standard Notes is perhaps the most security-focused note-taking app on the market. If security is your main concern, this app might be right for you. Everything you write is encrypted and for your viewing alone. The text editor is simple and plain, so you don’t get anything outlandish, and the search is also rather powerful, so you get what you’re looking for faster.

            Sadly, the app is unable to host or insert images and pictures, and you won’t be able to drag and drop notes between tags and folders, making it one of the more basic options overall.

            Available on iOS | Android

            6. Notion

            Notion note-taking app

              The note-taking experience you get on Notion is powerful and technical, unlike what you get anywhere else.

              Notion is great because you get a flexible template engine that provides for easily-duplicated pages. Notes here are also databases, meaning that you get greater updating and editing capabilities. The hierarchical organization is awesome, and you also get a hybrid Markdown editor.

              Sadly, Notion’s issues come with the account structure. You get 1,000 free blocks off the free plan account, but you’ll use them up quickly. So, if you don’t upgrade, you’re not getting much here.

              Available on iOS | Android

              Advertising

              7. Google Keep

              Google Keep screenshot

                 

                Google Keep is a basic, cross-platform note taker that works seamlessly with other tools from the company. It’s free, available on every platform, and people who appreciate simplicity in the note-taking app interface and experience will love it.

                Sadly, hierarchical organization is missing here. You only get one tag level, and for some, this is a bit of a turn off.

                Available on iOS | Android

                8. Slite

                Slite app screenshot

                  In terms of Markdown editing, nothing beats Slite. You also get a sleek table of contents view that allows you to easily zoom and jump to a specific heading in the doc. It’s also free for students, with up to 50 shared notes a month and unlimited private pages.

                  However, the hierarchy here is nested, so while you can nest collections infinitely, you can only sort by recency. The app is also slower than a lot of others, and while the editing is great, UI here is terribly sluggish.

                  Available on iOS | Android

                  9. Ulysses

                  Ulysses note-taking app

                    For people looking to take notes and write long essays, Ulysses is the top choice. Its organization is one of the best on the market, thanks to its multi-level hierarchical organization. The app is your companion throughout your writing process — from research to content development.

                    Advertising

                    However, perhaps the biggest selling point this app has is the ability to publish directly to WordPress. Once you’re done with writing and editing, you can format your document and upload it to WP straight from Ulysses.

                    Sadly, this note-taking app comes at the steep cost of $5 per month, and, just like Bear, only those with iOS and macOS can make use of it.

                    Available on iOS

                    10. Typora

                    Typora note-taking app

                      Typora provides a customizable experience, and it works on all major operating systems. The app is free, and it comes with the desired hybrid Markdown editor. You also get Focus Mode, which dims text you’re not working on for better concentration. Typora also provides a lot of themes, as well as the table of contents mode.

                      However, the Typora app doesn’t store notes, and it doesn’t have a mobile app itself, which is a drawback.

                      Available from Typora 

                      The Bottom Line

                      There are countless note-taking apps available to users. The trick is to find the one that’s right for you. This list can help you do just that.

                      Whether you’re looking for the best organization features, the most customizable experiences, or the best bang for your buck, you’ll find a note-taking app that fits your needs. Finding the best note-taking app for you is sure to help you stay organized in your personal or professional life!

                      More Productivity Tools You’ll Love

                      Featured photo credit: Adolfo Félix via unsplash.com

                      More by this author

                      Tanvir Zafar

                      The founder of ISU Technologies, passionate in writing about productivity, creativity, entrepreneurship, work and technology.

                      15 Best Organization Apps to Boost Your Productivity in 2021 7 Best Goal Tracking Apps to Help You Reach Your Goals 10 Best Note-Taking Apps to Keep Your Life Organized 10 Best Task List Apps to Boost Productivity in 2020 10 Most Effective Apps to Help You Beat Procrastination

                      Trending in Learning

                      1 How to Use the Learning Style Quiz to Accelerate Your Learning 2 10 Effective Ways To Make You a Fast Learner 3 Best Brain Workout! Super Learning Hacks 4 How to Know Which Types of Learning Styles Work for You? 5 Learning Methods to Help You Learn Effectively and Easily

                      Read Next

                      Advertising
                      Advertising
                      Advertising

                      Last Updated on June 1, 2021

                      How to Use the Learning Style Quiz to Accelerate Your Learning

                      How to Use the Learning Style Quiz to Accelerate Your Learning

                      If you’ve ever taken a learning style quiz, you know that the idea is to find your most prominent learning style. The question then becomes: what do you do with that information?

                      A textbook definition of learning styles is:[1]

                      “Characteristic cognitive, effective, and psycho-social behaviors that serve as relatively stable indicators of how learners perceive, interact with, and respond to the learning environment.”

                      That’s a fancy way of saying that different individuals interact with their learning environment in different ways. You’ll often see learning styles in conjunction with higher education and other types of cognitive learning courses. The theory is that, if the teacher is aware of the various ways in which people perceive information, they can differentiate the instruction to meet those needs.

                      To the casual learner, understanding your learning style can help you find the best way to learn new information. There are seven different learning styles, and everybody uses a little of each one (on a sliding scale).

                      In this article we will talk about how many different learning styles there are (and what they mean), get you to try the learning style quiz, and find out how to use your specific learning style to improve your life.

                      The 7 Learning Styles

                      The following is an overview of the various learning styles[2]:

                      1. Visual / Spatial

                      A visual learner thinks in pictures. They prefer having illustrations, pictures, and other types of images to help form a mental image of what they are learning. Visual learners are typically spatial thinkers.

                      Advertising

                      2. Aural / Auditory-Musical

                      An aural learner learns through music and rhythm. While actual music isn’t necessarily required to reach an aural learner, it certainly is more effective.

                      3. Verbal / Linguistic

                      A verbal learner prefers using words, both in speech and in reading. A person with this learning style might prefer a good lecture or textbook to more visual and auditory styles.

                      4. Physical / Kinesthetic

                      A physical learner prefers using their body, hands, and sense of touch. A person with this learning style is more of a “hands-on” learner who prefers to learn by doing.

                      5. Logical / Mathematical

                      A logical learner prefers information to flow from one thought or idea to the next. A person with this learning style prefers mathematics, logic, and reasoning.

                      6. Social / Interpersonal

                      A social learner prefers to learn in groups or through social interaction. A person with this learning style usually prefers group-work and project-based learning.

                      7. Solitary / Intrapersonal

                      A solitary learner prefers to work alone. People with this learning style are great at teaching themselves and often prefer self-study and online courses to more traditional learning methods.

                      Did you see yourself in more than one learning style? If so, then you understand that no one person has just one learning style. Each of the above styles exist in everybody to a certain degree.

                      If you take a learning style quiz, you might see a certain style emerge as the strongest (and, thus, more preferred). However, that does not mean that person cannot learn in one of the other ways listed.

                      Advertising

                      Learning Styles and the Brain

                      Learning styles influence and guide the way you learn. They affect the way you internally represent your experiences, remember information, or even dictate the words you choose[3].

                      Learning style quiz: Dunn & Dunn learning styles brain map [Source: Kos, (2017)]

                         

                        Research suggests that each learning style makes use of a different part of the brain. Here is the breakdown for each learning style:

                        • Visual: Visual learners use the occipital and parietal lobes at the back of the brain.
                        • Aural: Aural content is mostly processed through the temporal lobes (especially the right temporal lobe for music).
                        • Verbal: Verbal content is processed through the temporal and frontal lobes.
                        • Kinesthetic: Kinesthetic learning is processed using the cerebellum and the motor cortex.
                        • Logical: Logical learning is processed through the parietal lobes (specifically using the left side of the brain as it pertains to logical thinking).
                        • Social: Social learning happens in the frontal and temporal lobes.

                        How to Use the Learning Style Quiz to Improve Your Life

                        Perhaps you didn’t realize that people had different learning styles before you read this article. Maybe you already knew about learning styles.

                        Whatever the case, you can learn a lot about yourself just by taking a short learning styles quiz. But what do you do with the knowledge you get from the results?

                        Here are some tips:

                        Advertising

                        Visual Learner

                        If you’re a visual learner, focus on how you can make the material you’re learning more visually appealing[4].

                        1. Stay Organized

                        If a learning style quiz tells you you’re a visual learner, focus on getting your material organized. Your brain will likely feel overwhelmed if your notes are chaotic.

                        2. Use Color

                        Try color coding information in order to help your mind visually separate each bit. For example, if you’re studying for a history test, highlight dates in yellow, people in blue, and places in pink. This technique will set important pieces of information off in your mind and make them easier to remember.

                        3. Watch Videos

                        Ditch the audio-books and podcasts and either read or watch videos and lectures online. Your strength is found in visual explanation — seeing the information in a book, diagram, or demonstration.

                        Auditory Learner

                        If you’re an auditory learner according to your learning style quiz, focus on using your ability to hear to take in information[5].

                        1. Limit Distracting Noises

                        Traffic outside your window, students speaking nearby, or music blaring from a speaker won’t help you while studying. You’re already prone to take in the sounds around you, so if you want to learn something specific, find a quiet place to work where you can limit distracting noises.

                        2. Read Aloud

                        If you’ve taken notes in class, try reading them aloud to yourself. You can even create jingles or rhymes to help you remember specific bits of information.

                        3. Record Lectures

                        Instead of just simply writing notes as your professor or boss speaks, record the lecture or conversation and listen back later. This will help solidify the information with aural cues. Also, try speaking with classmates or coworkers to help “fill in” the information.

                        Advertising

                        Kinesthetic Learners

                        Your learning style quiz tells you that you’re a kinesthetic learner. Here are some study tips to help you[6].

                        1. Teach Someone

                        After you’ve studied the target information, try teaching it to someone else. This dynamic activity will help turn on your ability to recall the information.

                        2. Be Hands-on

                        Using your hands to create something will help your brain work through specific problems. If you need to remember 20 vocabulary words, try drawing a map and placing the words in specific places. This is related to the idea of a memory palace, which you can learn about here.

                        Bonus tip: Try chewing gum, as the movement may help activate learning centers in your brain.

                        3. Take Breaks

                        As a kinesthetic learner, your mind won’t like being in one static position for very long. Take time to get up and walk around or do another physical activity for a few minutes between study sessions.

                        Also be aware that most of the learning styles can fit into one of those three categories. You are essentially going to be one of these three types of learning styles paired with an interpersonal or intrapersonal preference. In other words, you either like working with others or you don’t.

                        If you’re ready to take your learning to the next level with your learning style, check out the video below for some more tips and tricks:

                        Final Thoughts

                        Have you taken the learning style quiz yet? If not, scroll down this page a bit and try the quiz now!

                        Advertising

                        If you spend just five to ten minutes on this quiz, it may give you insight into learning styles that will change your life.

                        More on How to Use the Learning Style Quiz

                        Featured photo credit: Eliabe Costa via unsplash.com

                        Reference

                        Read Next