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How To Make Your Next Presentation Unforgettable

How To Make Your Next Presentation Unforgettable

Presentation plays a vital role in representing an individual or company’s core values, innovations and efficiency. Every business and enterprise requires unique presentation in front of people in order to stand out from the rest and to build a confidence in people.

Giving a presentation in front of a group of people, including bosses, clients and people worldwide that are connected via teleconference is one of the toughest things you’ll have to do. During such a critical situation the major thing is to MAINTAIN CONFIDENCE. It doesn’t matter if your presentation is good or bad, if you are confident enough only then are you capable of sharing your ideas and can convince others. There are a few easy steps to make your presentation effective, interactive and memorable:

Vary sound, sight and evidence

Diversify your presentation material in order to keep the audience attentive with variation in your evidence, voice and visuals. By adding diversity while speaking and volume rate, you keep your audience’s attention and inspire them to tune in. By talking expressively and conversationally, your passion will shine.

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Inject your presentations with emotional words, like “excited.” With practice, you’ll feel more comfortable with this type of vocal variety. Rehearse your presentation and you will get confidence.

Fluctuating the kind of evidence you use to support claims in your presentation is vital. Presenters used to rely on their favorite kind of evidence, like stories or data. Both quantitative and quantitative academic exploration has found triangulating your support delivers more memorable results. Consequently, try to deliver three diverse kinds of evidence, such as a testimonial, a data point and a story. This will conveniently strengthen your argument.

In order to intensify the variety of your nonverbal delivery (movement and gestures), record yourself while delivering a presentation during rehearsal, then play the recording and practice your gestures/movements. You can add variation to body movements and gestures without the distraction of speaking.

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Know your audience

Being a presenter, your job is to assist your audience and make it easy for them to understand your message without any hurdles. Avoid delivering numbers devoid of context, because this makes it hard for the audience to understand the relevance.

An additional method to make things relevant is by connecting your presentation theme with information the audience already knows. You can activate the audience’s mental constructs by comparison of advanced information with something the audience already knows about.

Rehearse your presentation for better output

Rehearse your presentation again and again as many times as possible, and consequently you will get better. In this way you overcome your fear of forgetting some ideas or fear of lack of confidence. You must also be neatly dressed. Audiences are going to notice you and what you say, so it is always good to “put the best foot forward” for the day.

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Read the mindset of the audience

You should be capable of judging or studying the mindset of the clients/audiences who will be attending your presentation. You must be confident with the topic of the presentation and solve all the doubts related to it. So if your audience asks you a question, you should be capable of answering it.

Make them care

Emotionally-charged messages are more easily remembered by people than fact-based messages. Our emotional reactions have a fast roadway to our long-term memory. Try to bring some sort of emotion into your presentation to make it effective. Your tone and style should be compatible with the emotional impact. You should practice in front of those groups who can give feedback so you can make yourself as perfect as possible.

By adding emotion and variety, you can be sure the audience will remember it for a long time. The way you present leaves a strong impact on the audience. Amplify your positive impact on the audience by using these techniques and approaches.

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Featured photo credit: oikotimesofficial via oikotimesofficial.files.wordpress.com

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Tayyab Babar

Tayyab is a PR/Marketing consultant. He writes about work, productivity and tech tips at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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