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7 Strategies To Stay Super Focused

7 Strategies To Stay Super Focused

Staying focused on your task, priorities and mission is vital to your success. But it doesn’t come easily when you’re overwhelmed with daily distractions, a long to-do list, and multiple projects that demand your attention.

Here are seven strategies to stay super focused:

Say “no, thank you.”

Get clear on what you really want to achieve. Choose deliberately. Prune your to-do list. Declutter your schedule. Shed meaningless tasks. Forget about goals that no longer serve you. Switch gears or change the channel. Drop, delegate or barter assignments that don’t cater to your core strengths and true purpose.

Having too much on your plate weighs you down and creates leftover mess. Tackle three essential tasks to complete on a given day or three major goals to accomplish in a week. When something isn’t right for you, say “no, thank you.” This will give you more time and space to commit to things that matter.

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Mentally rehearse the task.

Visualize the ideal process, instead of obsessing over desired results. Picture yourself performing the task brilliantly and with ease. See yourself overcoming obstacles and maneuvering around hurdles. How will you feel when the deal is done? Elated? Excited? Evolved? Use these positive vibes to inspire you, pull you in, and take focused action.

Keep your energy up during breaks.

When you’re in a state of flow, it’s invigorating to stay on task. But forcing yourself to soldier on, when you’re drained, impairs your creativity and productivity. Regular breaks, for as little as 5 to 15 minutes, can do wonders. Take a walk, chat with a friend, grab a healthy snack, or get some fresh air.

Without consistent renewal and rejuvenation, it’s hard to stay alert and maintain focus. Set a regular bedtime routine and get a good night’s rest to avoid zoning out. Step away from the task when your interest in it begins to plummet. Go back to it when you refuel your energy.

Stop multitasking.

Doing multiple things at once or switching rapidly between tasks is the opposite of focus. So pick one important task and fully engage with it. Before you move on to the next thing, pause intentionally, take a deep breath, and bask in gratitude for the thing you just did.

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If you tend to get bored doing one task, you could set a timer to perform it in short bursts of 15 to 25 minutes. Or you could batch together similar tasks that require the same resources. For example, run your errands, file paperwork, reply to emails, and return telephone calls in designated time blocks.

Boost your willpower.

Focus requires self-control and the ability to resist short-term temptations for long-term gains. Breath-work, yoga and meditation are among the most effective ways to boost your willpower. These mindful practices help you take deliberate action, regardless of your shifting thoughts and volatile emotions.

You don’t have to follow through on each thought or act on every emotion that arises. You can simply sit with it without getting carried away by it. Come back to your breath. Do a body scan. Return to the present moment. Honing your willpower helps you stay focused rather than get distracted by mental chatter and unwanted feelings.

Make it automatic.

Develop regular habits and simple routines to make a task more automatic. Lay out the tools you will need to complete it. Pick a specific time to perform it. Set up reminders to work on it and reward yourself when you do.

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When an action step is part of your routine, you are bound to resist it less. This helps you preserve your energy and attention span for more difficult tasks that aren’t easily automated.

Create a supportive environment.

Constant interruptions and unnecessary distractions dilute your focus. Arrange your work space to discourage unscheduled visits. Plug in your earphones and listen to soothing music or white noise. Move to a quieter place if you can’t block out office banter. Schedule time blocks to focus on the task at hand.

If you want to complete a challenging project, turn off your phone, mobile devices and email and IM notifications. Disconnect from the Internet. Optimize your environment to keep your focus, find flow in your work, and experience real progress.

* * *

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Use one, all or a combination of these strategies to overcome internal busyness and reduce external distractions. Review what works for you. Make use of your preferred techniques to stay super focused and get meaningful things done.

Featured photo credit: Dani Ihtatho via flic.kr

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Last Updated on July 13, 2020

How Not to Feel Overwhelmed at Work & Take Control of Your Day

How Not to Feel Overwhelmed at Work & Take Control of Your Day

Overwhelm is a pernicious state largely caused by the ever-increasing demands on our time and the distractions that exist all around us. It creeps up on us and can, in its extreme form, leave us feeling anxious, stressed and exhausted.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed at work, here are 6 strategies you can follow that will reduce the feeling of overwhelm; leaving you calmer, in control and a lot less stressed.

1. Write Everything down to Offload Your Mind

The first thing you can do when you begin to feel overwhelmed is to write everything down that is on your mind.

Often people just write down all the things they think they have to do. This does help, but a more effective way to reduce overwhelm is to also write down everything that’s on your mind.

For example, you may have had an argument with your colleague or a loved one. If it’s on your mind write it down. A good way to do this is to draw a line down the middle of the page and title one section “things to do” and the other “what’s on my mind”.

The act of writing all this down and getting it out of your head will begin the process of removing your feeling of overwhelm. Writing things down can really change your life.

2. Decide How Long It Will Take to Complete Your To-Dos

Once you have ‘emptied your head,’ go through your list and estimate how long it will take to complete each to-do.

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As you go through your list, you will find quite a few to-dos will only take you five or ten minutes. Others will take longer, often up to several hours.

Do not worry about that at this stage. Just focus on estimating how long you will need to complete each task to the best of your ability. Here’s How to Cultivate a More Meaningful To Do List.

3. Take Advantage of Parkinson’s Law

Now here’s a little trick I learned a long time ago. Parkinson’s Law states that work will fill the time you have available to complete it, and us humans are terrible at estimating how long something will take:((Odhable: Genesis of Parkinson’s Law))

    This is why many people are always late. They think it will only take them thirty minutes to drive across town when previous experience has taught them it usually takes forty-five minutes to do so because traffic is often bad but they stick to the belief it will only take thirty minutes. It’s more wishful thinking than good judgment.

    We can use Parkinson’s Law to our advantage. If you have estimated that to write five emails that desperately need a reply to be ninety minutes, then reduce it down to one hour. Likewise, if you have estimated it will take you three hours to prepare your upcoming presentation, reduce it down to two hours.

    Reducing the time you estimate something will take gives you two advantages. The first is you get your work done quicker, obviously. The second is you put yourself under a little time pressure and in doing so you reduce the likelihood you will be distracted or allow yourself to procrastinate.

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    When we overestimate how long something will take, subconsciously our brains know we have plenty of time and so it plays tricks on us and we end up checking reviews of the Apple Watch 4 or allow our colleagues to interrupt us with the latest office gossip.

    Applying a little time pressure prevents this from happening and we get more focused and more work done.

    4. Use the Power of Your Calendar

    Once you have your time estimates done, open up your calendar and schedule your to-dos. Go through your to-dos and schedule time on your calendar for doing those tasks. Group tasks up into similar tasks.

    For emails that need attention on your to-do list, schedule time on your calendar to deal with all your emails at once. Likewise, if you have a report to write or a presentation to prepare, add these to your calendar using your estimated time as a guide for how long each will take.

    Seeing these items on your calendar eases your mind because you know you have allocated time to get them done and you no longer feel you have no time. Grouping similar tasks together keeps you in a focused state longer and it’s amazing how much work you get done when you do this.

    5. Make Decisions

    For those things you wrote down that are on your mind but are not tasks, make a decision about what you will do with each one. These things are on your mind because you have not made a decision about them.

    If you have an issue with a colleague, a friend or a loved one, take a little time to think about what would be the best way to resolve the problem. More often than not just talking with the person involved will clear the air and resolve the problem.

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    If it is a more serious issue, then decide how best to deal with it. Talk to your boss, a colleague and get advice.

    Whatever you do, do not allow it to fester. Ignoring the problem will not make it go away. You need to make a decision to deal with it and the sooner you do so the sooner the problem will be resolved. (You can take a look at this guide on How To Make Good Decisions All The Time.)

    I remember long ago, when I was in my early twenties and had gone mad with my newly acquired credit cards. I discovered I didn’t have the money to pay my monthly bills. I worried about it for days, got stressed and really didn’t know what to do. Eventually, I told a good friend of mine of the problem. He suggested I called the credit card company to explain my problem. The next day, I plucked up the courage to call the company, explained my problem and the wonderful person the other end listened and then suggested I paid a smaller amount for a couple of months.

    This one phone call took no more than ten minutes to make, yet it solved my problem and took away a lot of the stress I was feeling at the time. I learned two very valuable lessons from that experience:

    The first, don’t go mad with newly acquired credit cards! And the second, there’s always a solution to every problem if you just talk to the right person.

    6. Take Some Form of Action

    Because overwhelm is something that creeps up on us, once we feel overwhelmed (and stressed as the two often go together), the key is to take some form of action.

    The act of writing everything down that is bothering you and causing you to feel overwhelmed is a great place to start. Being able to see what it is that is bothering you in a list form, no matter how long that list is, eases the mind. You have externalized it.

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    It also means rather than these worries floating around in a jumbled mess inside your head, they are now visible and you can make decisions easier about what to do about them. Often it could be asking a colleague for a little help, or it could be you see you need to allocate some focused time to get the work done. The important thing is you make a decision on what to do next.

    Overwhelm is not always caused by a feeling of having a lack of time or too much work, it can also be caused by avoiding a decision about what to do next.

    The Bottom Line

    Make a decision, even if it is to just talk to someone about what to do next. Making a decision about how you will resolve something on its own will reduce your feelings of overwhelm and start you down the path to a resolution one way or another.

    When you follow these strategies to can say goodbye to your overwhelm and gain much more control over your day.

    More Tips for Reducing Work Stress

    Featured photo credit: Andrei Lazarev via unsplash.com

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