Advertising
Advertising

6 Essential Ways To Start Dressing With Confidence

6 Essential Ways To Start Dressing With Confidence

Nearly everyone strives to approach each day with confidence but many of us struggle to sincerely get there. While dressing in expensive clothes might give you a fleeting sense of satisfaction, real confidence is not just about the brands you wear, or the look you give off. Real confidence comes with excepting your personal quirks and working with them. In this way, you can dress with confidence by knowing your look, and playing to your personal strengths. The following six approaches are key to dressing with confidence.

1. Find Your Colors

The first way to dress with confidence is to know what looks excellent on you and what doesn’t. The biggest deciding factor is knowing what colors look best with your complexion and hair color. Though various methods of deciding your color palette exist, people with the same hair and skin colors tend to fall in similar categories. Finer features tend to fall into the “fall” category of warm tones, while darker features are complimented well by soft “spring” colors.

Advertising

2. Consider Your Shape

Bodyshapes

    Knowing your body shape is another key factor to dressing with confidence. Not everybody needs to be the same size or proportion, but dressing in ways that flatter your unique shape can help you confidently strut your stuff. Whether you’re a pear or an apple shape, short or tall, dressing for your shape makes all the difference.

    Advertising

    3. Play To Your Strengths

    After you get comfortable with what looks good on your body shape, consider your other strengths. If you have a curvier figure, you might be more commanding in a dress than a pantsuit, for example. If you are tall, vertical stripes will emphasize this, while horizontal stripes will do the opposite. Take a look at your features, like leg length versus torso length, or how wide your shoulders are, and take that into account with your body shape and colors. By choosing a flattering shape for your body, then choosing that outfit in a color you look best in, then playing to your strengths, you will have a well coordinated outfit, no matter your style.

    4. Know Your Personal Style

    Dressing in a way that makes you feel comfortable is also important to consider if you’d want to dress with confidence. Styles that feel natural to you may not always be conventional, but you should always communicate yourself to some degree in your dress in order to feel confident. Especially in day to day situations, feel free to show off your personal flair. This way your outfit will still feel like you, even if you’re trying out items you wouldn’t normally wear. Plus, your outfit is the first thing others see when they see you, so you should feel comfortable in the way that you present yourself to the world. 

    Advertising

    5. Consider The Occasion

    Another way to dress with confidence is to accurately size up the occasion you will be attending. it’s not easy to feel confident when you are over or under dressed, so try to make sure you’re dressed in a outfit that is appropriate for where you’ll be spending time. 

    6. Know Your Comfort Level

    Nothing is worse than being caught out in an outfit that makes you feel uncomfortable. It’s okay if you’re someone that likes to cover up more or less, but be aware of how much skin you’re showing. If your dress is longer than you prefer, you might start to feel frumpy. On the other hand, if you prefer to cover up, a plunging neckline or dress that’s shorter when you sit might make you feel anxious. Consider how comfortable you are with what your outfit does or doesn’t cover before you walk out the door, and you should always feel confident in the way you’re dressed.

    Advertising

    More by this author

    Alicia Prince

    A writer, filmmaker, and artist who shares about lifestyle tips and inspirations on Lifehack.

    When You Start to Enjoy Being Single, These 12 Things Will Happen 10 Things You Should Do If You’re Unemployed common words 18 Common Words That You Should Replace in Your Writing Wondering Why K Pop is So Popular? Here are 10 Reasons The 10 Most (And Least) Expensive States In America

    Trending in Productivity

    1 The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity? 2 How to Be More Creative and Come up with Incredible Ideas 3 Habits and Motivation: Master Both for Big Results 4 How to Improve Concentration and Sharpen Your Attention at Work 5 10 Reasons Why You’re Demotivated and How to Overcome It

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on May 22, 2019

    The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity?

    The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity?

    If you spend any time at all researching life hacks, you’ve probably heard of the famous Pomodoro Technique.

    Created in the 1980s by Francesco Cirillo, the Pomodoro Technique is one of the more popular time management life hacks used today. But this method isn’t for everyone, and for every person who is a passionate adherent of the system, there is another person who is critical of the results.

    Is the Pomodoro Technique right for you? It’s a matter of personal preference. But if you are curious about the benefits of using the technique, this article will break down the basic information you will need to decide if this technique is worth trying out.

    What is the Pomodoro Technique?

    The Pomodoro Technique is a time management philosophy that aims to provide the user with maximum focus and creative freshness, thereby allowing them to complete projects faster with less mental fatigue.

    The process is simple:

    For every project throughout the day, you budget your time into short increments and take breaks periodically.

    Advertising

    You work for 25 minutes, then take break for five minutes.

    Each 25-minute work period is called a “pomodoro”, named after the Italian word for tomato. Francesco Cirillo used a kitchen timer shaped like a tomato as his personal timer, and thus the method’s name.

    After four “pomodoros” have passed, (100 minutes of work time with 15 minutes of break time) you then take a 15-20 minute break.

    Every time you finish a pomodoro, you mark your progress with an “X”, and note the number of times you had the impulse to procrastinate or switch gears to work on another task for each 25-minute chunk of time.

    How the Pomodoro Technique boosts your productivity

    Frequent breaks keep your mind fresh and focused. According to the official Pomodoro website, the system is easy to use and you will see results very quickly:

    “You will probably begin to notice a difference in your work or study process within a day or two. True mastery of the technique takes from seven to twenty days of constant use.”

    If you have a large and varied to-do list, using the Pomodoro Technique can help you crank through projects faster by forcing you to adhere to strict timing.

    Watching the timer wind down can spur you to wrap up your current task more quickly, and spreading a task over two or three pomodoros can keep you from getting frustrated.

    The constant timing of your activities makes you more accountable for your tasks and minimizes the time you spend procrastinating.

    You’ll grow to “respect the tomato”, and that can help you to better handle your workload.

    Successful people who love it

    Steven Sande of The Unofficial Apple Weblog is a fan of the system, and has compiled a great list of Apple-compatible Pomodoro tools.

    Before he started using the technique, he said,

    Advertising

    “Sometimes I couldn’t figure out how to organize a single day in my calendar, simply because I would jump around to all sorts of projects and never get even one of them accomplished.”

    Another proponent of the Pomodoro Technique is Sue Shellenbarger of the Wall Street Journal. Shellenbarger tried out this system along with several other similar methods for time management, and said,

    “It eased my anxiety over the passing of time and also made me more efficient; refreshed by breaks, for example, I halved the total time required to fact-check a column.”

    Any cons for the Pomodoro Technique?

    Despite the number of Pomodoro-heads out there, the system isn’t without its critics. Colin T. Miller, a Yahoo! employee and blogger, tried using the Pomodoro Technique and had some issues:[1]

    “Pomodoros are an all or nothing affair. Either you work for 25 minutes straight to mark your X or you don’t complete a pomodoro. Since marking that X is the measurable sign of progress, you start to shy away from engaging in an activity if it won’t result in an X. For instance…meetings get in the way of pomodoros. Say I have a meeting set for 4:30pm. It is currently 4:10pm, meaning I only have 20 minutes between now and the meeting…In these instances I tend to not start a pomodoro because I won’t have enough time to complete it anyway.”

    Another critic is Mario Fusco, who argues that the Pomodoro Technique is…well…sort of ridiculous:[2]

    Advertising

    “Aren’t we really able to keep ourselves concentrated without a timer ticketing on our desk?… Have you ever seen a civil engineer using a timer to keep his concentration while working on his projects?… I think that, like any other serious professional, I can stay concentrated on what I am doing for hours… Bring back your timer to your kitchen and start working in a more professional and effective way.”

    Conclusion

    One of the best things about the Pomodoro Technique is that it’s free. Yeah, you can fork over some bills to get a tomato-shaped timer if you want… or you can use any timer program on your computer or phone. So even if you try it and hate it, you haven’t lost any cash.

    The process isn’t ideal for every person, or in any line of work. But if you need a systematic way to tackle your daily to-do list, the Pomodoro Technique may fit your needs.

    If you want to learn more about the Pomodoro Technique, check out this article: How to Make the Pomodoro Technique More Productive

    Reference

    [1] Aspirations of a Software Developer: A Month of the Pomodoro Technique
    [2] InfoQ: A Critique of the Pomodoro Technique

    Read Next