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30 Best Productivity Books You Should Read To Boost Your Productivity

30 Best Productivity Books You Should Read To Boost Your Productivity

You have dreams, aspirations and goals. And as a savvy hacker, you know that what you do day-to-day is directly tied to your future success. So you write a to-do list, install a CRM system, do your best at organizing your calendar, and push forward. No matter how hard you try though, you keep bumping up the feeling that you aren’t getting enough done.

Sounds about right?

Then it’s time to brush up on your productivity skills.

Success is not just about getting more stuff done (though there’s no denying that efficiency is a huge piece of the pie). You’ll also need to figure out why you’re doing what you’re doing, and if what you’re doing is even necessary.

You’ll want to consider things like your energy levels, natural work cycles, willpower, habits and what obstacles are getting in the way of using your time wisely. Taking all of that in with one go can feel overwhelming.

Lucky for you, I’ve sifted through dozens of ‘best of’ lists from all over the web and come up with these top 30 productivity books to help you get a one-up on life:

1. Getting Things Done: How to Achieve Stress-free Productivity, by David Allen

    “People often complain about the interruptions that prevent them from doing their work. But interruptions are unavoidable in life.”

    This book is something like the modern Bible of productivity books – it appears on every single productivity list and is recommended by many.

    Allen’s premise is simple (even if the book is not): “our productivity is directly proportional to our ability to relax.” He’s developed a framework that you can customize to your own needs and get all those pesky free-floating to-do’s into one organized system filled with files and action lists.

    There are dedicated followers of this system (self-named GTDers), but know that this is a complex system requiring a level of self discipline and organization just to get through the book.

    Kindle | Android | iTunes

    2. The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen Covey

      “The most effective way I know to begin with the end in mind is to develop a personal mission statement or philosophy or creed.”

      Everybody from Presidents to CEOs to college students use this book to organize themselves and stay on track doing what’s most important. Less a system for getting things done, this book provides a methodology for life and work. If you’re keen on becoming more productive, this is a library staple.

      Kindle  | Android | iTunes

      3. Think Like da Vinci: 7 Easy Steps to Boosting Your Everyday Genius, by Michael Gelb

        “We are each the center of a unique and special universe and totally insignificant specks of cosmic dust. Of all the polarities, none is more daunting than life and death. The shadow of death gives life its potential for meaning.”

        Part historical commentary on the genius of da Vinci, part productivity book with excellent exercises to boot, this book has a little bit for everybody. You won’t necessarily find accurate or extensive information about da Vinci as a thinker, but you will come away with valuable information.

        It will also give you new ways to experience the world and think differently all in the name of liberating your “unique intelligence”.

        Kindle | Android | iTunes

        4. The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business, by Charles Duhigg

          “About willpower: This is how willpower becomes a habit: by choosing a certain behavior ahead of time, and then following that routine when an inflection point arrives.”

          A fascinating look into what habits are, how we form them and how to change them. The first 2-3 chapters are the strongest and hold the information most of us are looking for: How to change our habits.

          This book is rife with strong examples of how people and businesses changed their habits and ultimately makes a case for how we can all change our habits to better support what we want most.

          Kindle | iTunes | Android

          5. Eat That Frog, by Brian Tracey

            “Eat a live frog first thing in the morning and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day.”

            As with most productivity books, you won’t be bowled over by new information, but Tracey does a great job of motivating the reader to stop procrastinating and just get stuff done.

            The book is broken down into 21 tips that Tracey himself uses to create his own outstanding success. The tips are very accessible and the book easy to read making it a great starting point for beginners.

            Kindle | Android | iTunes

            6. Getting Results the Agile Way: A Personal Results System for Work and Life, by J.D. Meier

              “A lot of people wait for their moment of inspiration before they start, but what they don’t realize is that simply by starting, the inspiration can follow.”

              Meier presents a system designed around producing results instead of focusing on activities themselves. While the book can be repetitive, the system is brilliant and simple making the book worth reading.

              The system has you set flexible boundaries, tasks, and goals against a fixed time. What you end up with is a focus on balance and outcomes over process. This means you end up staying focused on why you are working instead of the actual minutia of the task at hand.

              Kindle | Android

              7. The Power of Full Engagement, by Jim Loehr and Tony Schwartz

                “The number of hours in a day is fixed, but the quantity and quality of energy available to us is not.”

                This book is based on research done on athletes and high performers. What the authors discovered was that athletes perform their best when certain factors in their body and life are controlled correctly.

                For instance, one key to performing like a peak athlete is to manage energy, not time. They go on to explain the four primary sources of energy: physical, emotional, mental and spiritual.

                This is a book for anyone looking not just for a specific method to increase productivity, but a lifelong practice of sustained energy and focus.

                Kindle | Android | iTunes

                8. The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do To Get It, by Kelly McGonigal

                  “If there is a secret for greater self-control, the science points to one thing: the power of paying attention.”

                  This potent book takes a different spin on productivity and explains the new science of self-control and how it can be harnessed to improve health, happiness and – of course – productivity.

                  McGonigal explains exactly what willpower is, how it works and why it matters. She also gives you tips and exercises on improving your self-discipline and willpower.

                  There’s even a related 10-week course if you want to extend what you’ve learned in the book.

                  Kindle | Android | iTunes

                  9. The Power of Story: Change Your Story, Change Your Destiny, by Jim Loehr

                   

                    “We grow the aspects of our lives that we feed – with energy and engagement – and choke off those we deprive of fuel. Your life is what you agree to attend to.”

                    If you’re up for a book about defining your mission and purpose in life, then this is for you. While lengthy, it is simple and well written, ultimately giving a straightforward methodology for creating life stories for the different parts of your life.

                    One of the best parts of the book is the section on discovering and defining your Ultimate Mission and the Story Creation Process – helping you dig into what your purpose is and learning about how we craft the stories we tell.

                    Kindle | Android | iTunes

                    10. Ready for Anything: 52 Productivity Principles for Getting Things Done, by David Allen

                      “Sometimes the biggest gain in productive energy will come from cleaning the cobwebs, dealing with old business, and clearing the desks – cutting loose debris that’s impeding forward motion.”

                      This is Allen’s follow up book to his legendary Getting Things Done. Unlike the other dense resource, this is a compilation of pearls of wisdom from his years of coaching and consulting.

                      An easy read and a fun addition to the library, this book helps you understand the philosophy behind Getting Things Done.

                      Kindle | Android | iTunes

                      11. The Now Habit: A Strategic Program for Overcoming Procrastination and Enjoying Guilt-Free Play, by Neil Fiore

                        “In most cases you are the one who confuses just doing the job with testing your worth. Replace ‘I have to’ with ‘I choose to’.”

                        As the title suggests, this is a book about overcoming procrastination. With an upbeat tone and positive attitude, Fiore provides a comprehensive plan to overcome that pesky habit we all seem to have.

                        Probably the best part of the book are the tools to diagnose your own procrastination problem to get behind the issue itself. It also provides other tools so that, once you do know the nature of your problem, you can finally start getting things done.

                        Kindle | Android | iTunes

                        12. Life Hacker: The Guide to Working Smarter, Faster, and Better, by Adam Pash

                          “This book isn’t a computer user manual, and it isn’t a productivity system – it’s a little bit of each.”

                          This book is dense with hacks, tips and tricks to get things done faster and more efficiently. No philosophy here, just straight up tools to make your life more automated and streamlined.

                          The hacks include getting the most out of your computer’s operating system, smartphone and a 100+ shortcuts to use. If you like links and references, this is your book.

                          You’ll likely get lost down the rabbit hole of suggestions but, the book is structured in such an organized way, it’s easy to return to where you left off or jump to a section most relevant to your needs.

                          Kindle | Android |  iTunes

                          13. The Power of Less, by Leo Babuata

                            “Instead of focusing on how much you can accomplish, focus on how much you can absolutely love what you’re doing.”

                            Babuata is known well for his blog Zen Habits and this book is a direct extension of what he shares there. A brilliantly simple take on productivity that actually feels manageable.

                            The book provides productivity tips but goes way beyond by infusing a Zen-like philosophy, encouraging you to reflect on and understand what matters most to you and why.

                            Kindle | Android | iTunes

                            14. Zen to Done: The Ultimate Simple Productivity System, by Leo Babuata

                              “Take as much stuff off your plate as possible, so you can focus on doing what’s important, and doing it well.”

                              Using his usual Zen philosophy, Babuata takes the best productivity tips and tools from other systems and simplifies them. Babuata breaks it down into 10 simple, straightforward habits and how to change them, keeping it as simple as possible.

                              If you prefer a more complex system with lists, graphs, charts and such this is not for you.

                              Kindle | Android | iTunes

                              15. 101 Ways to Have a Business and a Life, by Andrew Griffiths

                                “When we are recharged, feeling good, feeling healthy, have caught up on sleep and so on, we are in a much better state of mind, and this revitalized energy is reflected in our business.”

                                Griffiths compiled tips, experiences and responses from thousands of business owners to write this book, which helps business owners identify the main reasons for work-life imbalance and suggests ways to fix it.

                                Well organized and easy to read, this book is designed to be picked up and read even when things are at their most overwhelming.

                                Particularly charming is the author’s own story of how his business overtook his life and affected his own relationships and health. His wake up call and the changes he made prompted the writing of this book, which turns out to be as practical a guide as he would have needed when he finally realized what his business was doing to him.

                                Kindle | Android

                                16. Total Workday Control: Using Microsoft Outlook, by Michael Lineberger

                                  “If struggling staff try to “do it all” by rushing through the day at 200 mph, they become more inefficient.”

                                  A well respected book for the worker who uses Microsoft Outlook, a software mainstay for the majority of companies worldwide. This book tends to assume you’re already using core productivity skills taught in other books, like David Allen’s Getting Things Done, so it’s best to use this book in combination with another, more generalized book on productivity.

                                  That said, this is an impressive work that takes you deep into the technical aspects of Outlook’s capabilities ultimately freeing up time for more important tasks.

                                  Kindle | Android | iTunes

                                  17. One Year to an Organized Life: From Your Closets to Your Finances, the Week-by-Week Guide to Getting Completely Organized for Good, by Regina Leeds

                                    “The chaos around you is an effect. It is the result of a cause that was set in motion, most likely, but not always, a long time ago.”

                                    This witty and straightforward book takes you on a yearlong journey of organization.

                                    Leeds helps you break down tasks and build routines over time so you never do feel overwhelmed. Tasks are broken down into categories that are assigned to a specific month. Each month is then organized into a system of assignments for each week. Baby steps is the name of this game.

                                    Kindle | Android | iTunes

                                    18. The ONE Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results, by Gary Keller

                                      “Work is a rubber ball. If you drop it, it will bounce back. The other four balls– family, health, friends, integrity – are made of glass. If you drop one of these, it will be irrevocably scuffed, nicked, perhaps even shattered.”

                                      Keller’s premise is that we work on too many things at once. We would get significantly more done, with less effort, if we reduce the number of things we focus on – preferably just one thing.

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                                      So, instead of measuring our productivity by the number of things accomplished, Keller prompts us to focus on the one thing that will most greatly impact our day, week, month or life.

                                      A highly enjoyable book and a refreshing reminder that less is more.

                                      Kindle | iTunes

                                      19. Manage Your Day-to-Day: Build Your Routine, Find Your Focus, and Sharpen Your Creative Mind, by Jocelyn K. Glei

                                        “The single most important change you can make in your working habits is to switch to creative work first, reactive work second.”

                                        This is a book with a number of contributors, which makes it a book for everyone. It provides a variety of viewpoints, tips and observations on focus, routine-building, creativity and useful tools to have in your belt.

                                        However, if you’re expecting in-depth information on any particular topic, you might be disappointed. While there are many gems to be found, the contributions can be brief.

                                        Kindle

                                        20. Execution IS the Strategy: How Leaders Achieve Maximum Results in Minimum Time, by Laura Stack

                                          “One way to make everyone speed up is for you, the leader, to discover, and eliminate any obstacles that prevent team members from moving quickly.”

                                          A great book for leaders of any organization of any size. The majority of the book focuses on helping individuals, leaders and organizations figure out where they are weak while providing tools and strategies for how to address it.

                                          Kindle

                                          21. Work Smarter: 350+ Online Resources Today’s Top Entrepreneurs Use To Increase Productivity and Achieve Their Goals, by Nick Loper

                                            “This isn’t about the latest gadgetry or shifting your mindset; it’s about how to increase productivity so you can achieve your goals. It’s about working smarter, not harder.“

                                            This book is a compilation of resources every time management and productivity nerd needs. With a nod toward efficiency, the book is written is bullet point form naming the resource and a quick line or two describing what it does.

                                            As you’d expect, there are tools galore for CRM, ecommerce, email, file sharing, storage, marketing, news and travel.

                                            Kindle

                                            22. The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right, by Atul Gawande

                                              “The volume and complexity of what we know has exceeded our individual ability to deliver its benefits correctly, safely, or reliably.”

                                              After so many books offering complex and sophisticated organization and productivity systems, Gawande’s technique can feel like a cool drink of water. He offers the humble checklist.

                                              But do not dismiss this book too quickly! The author goes on to cleverly demonstrate why the checklist is the superior tool for any productive, organized person using examples of pilots and doctors in life threatening situations to make his case.

                                              You’ll likely never look at a checklist the same again.

                                              Kindle | Android | iTunes

                                              23. Ready Aim Fire!: A Practical Guide To Setting And Achieving Goals, by Erik Fisher and Jim Woods

                                                 

                                                “Goals require intentionality. A ship doesn’t just leave the harbor and find the destination by chance.”

                                                Though the examples in this book are bent toward the writing craft, this book can be applied to any project or goal.

                                                The authors provide a step-by-step plan to set goals that include intentional rest periods. They also include personality and aptitude tests, like DISC, Myers-Briggs and a Strengthsfinder test.

                                                Written in a simple style, this is a great book for those of us with a short attention span.  Kindle | Android

                                                24. What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast: A Short Guide to Making Over Your Mornings–and Life, by Laura Vanderkam

                                                  “The best morning rituals are activities that don’t have to happen and certainly don’t have to happen at a specific hour. These are activities that require internal motivation.”

                                                  If you liked any of Vanderkam’s shorter works, you’re in luck. This book combines her three popular mini e-books into one comprehensive guide.

                                                  This is a very easy read, very enjoyable and filled with useful nuggets of information. As the title suggests, if you struggle with getting things done in the morning, this is a book for you.

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                                                  Kindle | Android | iTunes

                                                  25. Time Warrior: How to defeat procrastination, people-pleasing, self-doubt, over-commitment, broken promises and chaos, by Steve Chandler

                                                    “A warrior takes his sword to the future. A warrior also takes his sword to all circumstances that do not allow him to fully focus.”

                                                    Chandler takes traditional time-management and turns it on its head. This is a book about “non-linear time management”.

                                                    Otherwise put, this is a book about working in the present moment while breaking your brain’s habit to think linearly into the future about what needs to get done.

                                                    There were moments when it felt like Chandler was calling me out personally, so adeptly does he understand our linear mind work tendencies.

                                                    This book gives gentle and simple tools to rewire your relationship to time, productivity and integrity.

                                                    Kindle | Android | iTunes

                                                    26. The Productive Person: A How-to Guide Book Filled with Productivity Hacks & Daily Schedules for Entrepreneurs, Students or Anyone Struggling with Work-Life Balance, by Chandler Bolt, James Roper and Jamie Buck

                                                      “We’re all guilty of adding too many tasks to our to do lists, only to find ourselves moving unfinished tasks to tomorrow’s list at the end of the day. Then we repeat the cycle week in and week out.”

                                                      A great book geared toward people who work for themselves or in a company that allows them to manage their own schedules every day.

                                                      When we’re on our own with time, it can easily feel like there aren’t enough hours in the day to get everything done. The authors show you how to change that mindset and fill each day with more using a condensed, compact and very simple format.

                                                      Kindle | iTunes

                                                      27. 23 Anti-Procrastination Habits: How to Stop Being Lazy and Get Results in Your Life, by S.J. Scott

                                                        “You can trace every success (or failure) in your life back to a habit. What you do on a daily basis largely determines what you’ll achieve in a life.”

                                                        A very quick and easy read filled with concise action steps for each habit. This book provides a survey of other time management methods and so makes a good place to start if you’ve not been exposed to other time management strategies.

                                                        The methods suggested are the standard task list creation, assigning them and attaching dates for follow up. Not terribly original, but a great place to begin if you’re new to time management.

                                                        Kindle | iTunes

                                                        28. Profit from the Positive: Proven Leadership Strategies to Boost Productivity and Transform Your Business, by Margaret Greenberg, and Senia Maymin

                                                          “For the last 50-plus years, sociologists have been asking people to keep time diaroes of their activities. Surprisingly, people report only one momre hour of free time today compared with 1965. We’re busier than ever, yet we seem to be accomplishing less and less.”

                                                          A book that blends best practices from top business leaders and concepts of positive psychology.

                                                          For the information junkie, this book is fantastic. It’s well-structured with solid takeaways, including tools, reflection questions, a reading and discussion guide and summaries in the appendix – meaning plenty of reading and references to keep you busy for a long time.

                                                          Kindle | Android | iTunes

                                                          29. Pomodoro Technique Illustrated, by Staffan Noteberg

                                                            “Getting thoughts out of your head is mandatory if you want to be able to stay focused.”

                                                            No productivity list would be complete without the Pomodoro Technique. This simple but powerful method has permeated the working culture at large.

                                                            In it’s most basic form, the Pomodoro Technique has you chunk work in 25 minute segments with 5 minute breaks in between. This framework for productivity forces you to focus on one thing at a time, leaving less room for procrastination.

                                                            Kindle

                                                            30. The Desire Map, by Danielle LaPorte

                                                              “Knowing how you actually want to feel is the most potent form of clarity that you can have.”

                                                              This book is a bit of an outlier in the productivity genre, but LaPorte claims (and her hordes of enthusiastic supporters would agree) that focusing on the desire behind your goals will lead you to the actualization of your goals with far more clarity and effectiveness than otherwise. It’s a creative, interesting look at how and why we do what we do.

                                                              As LaPorte says, we have the system backwards. We shouldn’t be chasing the goals themselves, we should be “chasing the feeling that you hope achieving that goal will give you.”

                                                              Kindle | iTunes

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                                                              So here you go, 30 best productivity books that will help improve your productivity and get you to achieve more. Pick one and start reading it, and don’t just read it, apply the tips and techniques to your work and everyday life, then you’ll find yourself achieve more that actually matters!

                                                              Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                                                              Heather Rees

                                                              Career coach and creative startup strategist

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                                                              Last Updated on January 24, 2020

                                                              10 Good Habits To Have in Life To Be More Successful

                                                              10 Good Habits To Have in Life To Be More Successful

                                                              Habits are behaviors and patterns that you showcase by default. They enable you to carry out crucial activities like taking a shower, brushing your teeth, getting prepared for work.

                                                              Interestingly, you follow this routine every day without considering them. Your unconscious habits create room for your brain to perform more advanced activities like problem-solving and choosing what book to read.

                                                              Everyone has habits, and several of those habits are activated every day. I would classify them into three groups:

                                                              • The first category includes the habits that you hardly notice as they have become a major part of your life- such as brushing teeth or wearing clothes.
                                                              • The second category comprises good habits to have to be more successful-like eating healthily, exercising your body and reading books.
                                                              • The last group consists of those habits that are harmful-like procrastinating, smoking or overeating.

                                                              Habits are fundamental to becoming successful in life — or probably ending up a failure. Yet, as significant as habits are, some lack the knowledge of their capabilities.

                                                              Habits are default activities that you engage in without giving an afterthought. They are automatic behavioral or mental activities. They help you carry out some actions without exerting too much energy. They simplify your life.

                                                              Several people aspire to break bad habits. For instance, some people diet to stop overeating. They exercise to reduce obesity. Habits can hinder or impact your performance and productivity.

                                                              That’s why I would share 10 good habits to have to be more successful in life.

                                                              1. Begin Your Day with Meditation

                                                              I recommend mindful meditation early in the morning. This practice helps you to be in the present moment. Consequently, it enables you to be mindful of challenging situations during the day.

                                                              Different stressors may trigger as you go through the day; meditation helps you to remain calm before taking on the challenges.

                                                              Personally, it helps me to devise strategies and think about ideas. Meditation is a good habit to have if you want to be connected to what’s significant in your life.

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                                                              2. Be Grateful for What You Have

                                                              Sometimes, you waste time thinking of what’s not enough. You become immersed in those daunting challenges. However, challenges justify the presence of hope. When you have life, you have expectations. You will be free from challenges when you are six feet under. The only strategy you have to stop focusing on your problems is to focus on what you have.

                                                              Gratitude is a time-tested pathway to success, health, and happiness. It redirects your focus to what you have from what you lack. Here’s what James Clear does every day,[1]

                                                              “I say one thing I’m grateful for each day when I sit down to eat dinner.”

                                                              3. Smile

                                                              Can you pause and smile before you continue reading this?

                                                              Now here is what just happened based on research conducted by the Association for Psychological Science; you set a pace for living a happier life when you smile. A genuine smile or what’s called a Duchenne smile is a good habit to have if you want to find spiritual, emotional and mental peace of mind.[2]

                                                              Smiling induces the release of molecules that function towards fighting stress. The physiological state of your body determines the state of your mind. When you slouch or frown, your mind takes cues relating to unhappiness and depression. But, once you adjust yourself by putting up a smile, you begin to feel a new level of excitement and vibrancy.

                                                              Can you smile again?

                                                              4. Start Your Day with a Healthy Breakfast

                                                              Starting your day with a healthy breakfast is a good habit to have and forms a crucial part of your life. Nevertheless, about 31 million Americans skip their breakfast each day.[3]

                                                              If you are fed up hearing that breakfast is a crucial component of your day, you are only fighting the truth. If you want to become more successful, you need to ‘break your fast’ with healthy foods every morning.

                                                              This habit is not difficult to form if you usually rush out the door every single morning. You can wake up earlier to fix yourself a meal so you don’t break down during the day.

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                                                              Get inspired by these 20 Healthy Breakfast Choices That Will Save You Time.

                                                              5. Exercise Daily

                                                              One of the good habits to have is to exercise your body and muscles every day. You don’t have to run a marathon or lift a weight. You only need to engage in less strenuous activities that oxygenate your blood and inject endorphins in your body.

                                                              Jack Dorsey, the CEO of Twitter, classified exercise as a good habit to maximize his already jam-packed schedule.[4] He said,

                                                              ‘I wake up by 5, meditate for 30 minutes, seven-minute workout times three, make coffee, and check-in.’

                                                              He said on Product Hunt that he follows this routine every day as it gives him a steady-state that empowers him to be more productive.

                                                              6. Manage Your Time as You Manage Your Finance

                                                              Another good habit is the act of managing your time effectively. This goes a long way to impact your achievement.

                                                              Time management is what separates the successful from the rest of the world as we all possess the same amount of time. How you leverage time determines your potential to succeed in life.

                                                              So how do you manage your time effectively?

                                                              Here’s Jack Dorsey’s recommendation in one of the Techonomy events;

                                                              “I accomplish effective time management by theming my days and practicing self-discipline. These themes help me handle distractions and interactions. If a request or task does not align with the theme for that day, I don’t do it. This sets a cadence for everyone in the company to deliver and evaluate their progress”.

                                                              And this is Dorsey’s weekly theme:[5]

                                                              • Monday – Management
                                                              • Tuesdays – Product
                                                              • Wednesday – Marketing and growth
                                                              • Thursdays – Developers and partnerships
                                                              • Fridays – Culture and recruiting
                                                              • Saturdays – Taking off
                                                              • Sundays – Reflection, feedback, strategy, and preparing for Monday

                                                              No wonder he was able to run two companies when others were struggling with one job.

                                                              7. Set Daily Goals with Intentions

                                                              Everyone has goals. It may relate to business or personal life. The truth is, we’re all tending towards a particular direction or another. Nevertheless, while long-term goals can offer you direction, it’s your daily goals that you establish that help you develop short-term goals that are essential for your success.

                                                              Long-term goals may not give you the motivation you need to keep on. But when you implement your short-term milestones daily, you become fired up, and you can overcome the challenges that come with taking on bigger tasks.

                                                              Here’s the main truth:Successful people don’t set goals without establishing their intentions. According to Jennifer Cohen of Forbes,[6]

                                                              “What helps you to achieve your desired expectation is ensuring intentions accompany your daily goals.”

                                                              Be intentional about your daily goals!

                                                              8. Seek Inspiration

                                                              It is usually difficult to be inspired for a considerable length of time. Sometimes, you become discouraged and feel like giving up on your goals when things are not working out as intended.

                                                              A practical approach to stay on top of the situation is to inspire yourself each day. When you wake up in the morning after meditation, watch some motivational videos, and let the story of great leaders inspire you.

                                                              Establish what Anthony Robbins called the ‘hour of power.’ Determine how many minutes you spend but make it count. Inspiration is the fuel for achievement because when you can conceive it in your mind, you can accomplish it.

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                                                              Michal Solowow, an investor and the founder of Mitex, a construction company puts it this way,[7]

                                                              “The problems I encounter in everyday life motivates me to find solutions. This is a self-propelling mechanism. becoming a billionaire was never a motivating factor.”

                                                              9. Save Steadily, Invest with All Prudence

                                                              I can exhaust the good habits to have without talking about saving and investing. Most times, you overlook the significance of saving for the future when you are living in your present moment. According to CNBC, a $1000 emergency will propel several Americans into debt.[8]

                                                              However, it is not enough to save, and you must invest your fund and be wise with it. If you pay attention to this now, you will set yourself for a life of success in the future. Ensure you save at least six months in your emergency account so you can be prepared for any future emergency.

                                                              10. Budget and Track Your Spendings

                                                              Benjamin Franklin warned of taking the precaution of little expenses. He said,

                                                              “A small leak sinks a great ship.”

                                                              It is easy to discard little expenses, but the truth is they always add up. This happens when you fail to budget.

                                                              Budgeting is a good habit to have, which can impact your financial life significantly. The money you spend on extravagant lifestyles can be saved and invested in your future.

                                                              The Bottom Line

                                                              Endeavor to cultivate these good habits to have to become more successful as you journey through life. The quicker you cultivate them, the faster you achieve your goals.

                                                              More About Habits

                                                              Featured photo credit: Andrijana Bozic via unsplash.com

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                                                              Reference

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