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3 Threats to Effective Time Blocking and How To Solve Them

3 Threats to Effective Time Blocking and How To Solve Them

Time blocking is a great way to get things done effectively. However, if you are not cautious enough, you can easily kill your time block productivity with these three common threats:

  • Procrastination

  • Wasting time without preparation

  • Distraction (internal/external)

First of all, procrastination is perhaps the most common reason for not getting something done within your time block. It’s actually one of the worst ways to spend your time, because you most likely are aware of this activity, and yet you still do it.

For instance, your goal is to write a report for your boss and you have decided to focus on this task between 9am and 10am. Yet, when you discuss things with your colleagues or check on your friends’ Facebook statuses during this time, you just waste your valuable minutes that should be spent on working instead.

Procrastination is wasting time for sure, but you can waste time otherwise as well. For instance, if you decided to write a blog post before going to work, but you just started planning the post in the morning when you should be actually writing it, you are not taking advantage of the time block you have.

Finally, distraction is another big threat to effective time blocking, and this can happen either if you are at home or at the office. It can even happen if you are working by yourself. The distractions come both as external and internal ones, and if you do not realize the possible sources of distractions in advance, it can ruin your time block productivity for sure.

With these three threats, you can destroy your momentum and getting any real work done. However, the next questions are: why do these threats exist and are you actually inviting them into your daily work life (and into your time blocks)?

So why do you allow them?

With these three threats, you can take two stances: you can either allow or disallow them.

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Unfortunately, if you don’t pay enough attention to this matter, you allow these productivity threats to affect your daily life, and thus make it harder for you to meet your goals that you have set for the day.

So when I talk about “allowing these threats,” I mean the following:

  • You are too busy to get started with your task

You would like to get started with your task right away, but you don’t care to plan your steps in advance. With this planning, you could avoid the common pitfalls during your time block,  like pondering what action to take next or failing to understand the dependencies of your task with other people (sometimes you can’t move forward with your task until someone else has done their part first).

You might also think that if you started right away, you get a head start and you can actually finish your task well before the deadline. Although this may be the case sometimes, too often the results are other than the desired ones.

  • You don’t have an optimum workplace

One sure way to get exposed to distraction is not having a dedicated and quiet workplace to do your work. The more dynamic the environment is (like working in a cubicle or trying to get work done when your family is around you), the less productive you are most likely going to be.

On the other hand, sometimes this situation can be turned around and you can experience something called the cocktail party effect, where you can actually filter out the majority of distractions and focus on just one thing at a time (like in a cocktail event, when you focus on the conversation with a single person, while filtering out the rest of the party-goers).

Unless you are consciously choosing a crowded place (like a coffee shop or a train) to do your work, distraction can turn against you and kill your productivity.

  • You are doing it when your energy is at its lowest

Doing work when your energy is at its lowest is a fertile ground for procrastination.

I realized this when I was doing a seemingly simple task and then I all of a sudden started procrastinating on it.

Although the task took only couple of minutes to finish, I still had internal resistance to complete it. This was due to the fact that I was doing the work late in the evening, when my mind was already off work-mode, and it was looking forward to doing something more fun (like watching television).

According to The Willpower Instinct, your self-discipline drains throughout the day and the willpower reserve is at its highest in the morning. This is exactly what I experienced with my task.

The true cause for these threats

So why is it so easy to get started with your time block right away without doing any preparation?

One reason can be that you think you lose your valuable time with preparation and that taking action right away is what you should be doing instead.

Unfortunately, even if you get started quickly, you might run into roadblocks on your way and you tend to waste your time, thus making sure that you actually finish your task slower, rather than faster.

Another reason is that you probably don’t value the actual preparation part that much and don’t want to spend enough time on such unproductive activity (it’s not helping me to finish my task any faster, thus it’s unproductive, right?).

Finally, spending time on planning and preparing is taking your time away from the actual task execution itself (at least this is how you think). This can be the case when you start working on your task too late in relation to the deadline. And every minute you are not actually doing the work inside your dedicated time block, you feel like you are losing time.

Everything can be fixed with a small preparation

Believe it or not, planning and preparing for the time task in advance is actually doing the work already. With proper preparation, you get rid of the unnecessary roadblocks that could occur during your time blocks.

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Also, make sure to time block your planning phase as well. This is very important, and you ensure that you can truly maximize the available time for the task (by taking everything necessary into account, like those productivity threats).

Bulletproof your time blocks — here is how

1. Set boundaries. If you happen to work at home, make sure that you family is aware of what you are doing. This way, they value the work you do more and are less likely to distract you.

If possible, try to work as much as you can when they are out of the house or are sleeping. This is exactly what I did (and I still do) when I had a day job. I was building my online business on the side, but since it was challenging to get work done when my almost 2-year-old son was awake, I decided to work during his nap times or early in the mornings when he was still sleeping.

2. Have the right space to do your work. If possible, try to “isolate yourself” when doing the work. This means that you figure out in advance the place where you do your work.

In my case, I have two ways to “isolate myself.” The first one is to do work when the rest of the family is sleeping. The other way is a dedicated work room at my parent’s place where I can go to do work.

When I’m physically outside of our home, I get work done really well. However, I let my wife know my location and that way she can reach me if anything urgent happens.

3. Prepare for your tasks in advance — with a time block. To have an effective time block, make sure to block some time for the planning and prep work as well. This ensures that you map out all the possible roadblocks and other threats to your productive work.

Spending time alone and really figuring out the different parts of your task will help you out a lot during the actual working phase.

4. Pick the right time of the day. To avoid procrastination, try to pick out the right timing for your time block. In my case, I try to do my work during the morning (because that’s when I’m most alert), but your situation may be different.

Pay close attention to your mood during the day, figure out in which part of the day you are most alert, and block your time for that moment (so, after eating lunch is not probably the optimum time).

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5. Clear your mind. If you feel tired and can’t focus on your work, take a quick nap. I have experienced a total change in my well-being and productivity when I take a quick power nap (20 minutes max).

You can also decide to write down the ideas and thoughts that you get during your work. I have a piece of paper and pen with me when I work, so that I can do a “mini brain dump” and get those thoughts out of my mind (which I can then process later).

Finally, you can decide to start a simple meditation practice of 5 minutes every day. You just basically close your eyes and say quietly in your mind “inhale” while breathing in, and then say “exhale” while breathing out. If your mind starts wandering around (which it will), focus back on your breath.

Meditation is a longer-term practice and it requires patience until you can see the benefits — like the improvements in your focus.

6. Automate the mundane and repetitive parts.  Do you know if any of the tasks you do within your time block can be automated? If so, take precautionary action steps to do the automation.

For instance, you can create a template out of the document that you use on a frequent basis. That way you can save some time and are not wasting your precious time block for low-value activities (like creating a document from scratch every time).

Conclusion

Time blocks are a great way to get work done, but you can ruin them by procrastinating, by wasting your time without preparation, or when being exposed to distraction.

The main point is to make sure to map out your environment, your timing, and your tasks well in advance. That way you can be sure that your time block gets you the maximum results.

Over to you: How do you make sure you can eliminate the productivity threats during your time blocks?

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More by this author

Timo Kiander

Productivity Author and Founder of Productive Superdad

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Last Updated on July 23, 2019

5 Steps To Move Out Of Stagnancy In Life

5 Steps To Move Out Of Stagnancy In Life

In the journey of growth, there are times when we grow and excel. We are endlessly driven and hyped up, motivated to get our goals.

Then there are times when we stagnate. We feel uninspired and unmotivated. We keep procrastinating on our plans. More often than not, we get out of a rut, only to get back into another one.

How do you know if you are stagnating? Here are some tell-tale signs:

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  • If you have been experiencing chronic procrastination on your goals
  • If you don’t ever feel like doing anything
  • If you keep turning to sleep, eating, games, mindless activities and entertainment for comfort
  • If you know you should be doing something, but yet you keep avoiding it
  • If you have not achieved anything new or significant now relative to 1 month, 2 months or 3 months ago
  • If you have a deep sense of feeling that you are living under your potential

When we face stagnation in life, it’s a sign of deeper issues. Stagnation, just like procrastination, is a symptom of a problem. It’s easy to beat ourselves over it, but this approach is not going to help. Here, I will share 5 steps to help you move out of this stagnation. They won’t magically transform your life in 1 night (such changes are never permanent because the foundations are not built), but they will help you get the momentum going and help you get back on track.

1. Realize You’re Not Alone

Everyone stagnates at some point or another. You are not alone in this and more importantly, it’s normal. In fact, it’s amazing how many of my clients actually face the same predicament, even though all of them come from different walks of life, are of different ages, and have never crossed paths. Realizing you are not alone in this will make it much easier to deal with this period. By trying to “fight it”, you’re only fighting yourself. Accept this situation, acknowledge it, and tell yourself it’s okay. That way, you can then focus on the constructive steps that will really help you.

2. Find What Inspires You

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Stagnation comes because there isn’t anything that excites you enough to take action. If you don’t have a habit of setting goals, and instead just leave yourself to daily mundanes, it’s not surprising you are experiencing stagnation. What do you want to do if there are no limitations? If you can have whatever you want, what will it be? The answers to these questions will provide the fuel that will drive you forward.

On the other hand, even if you are an experienced goal setter, there are times when the goals you set in the past lose their appeal now. It’s normal and it happens to me too. Sometimes we lose touch with our goals, since we are in a different emotional state compared to when we first set them. Sometimes our priorities change and we no longer want to work on those goals anymore. However, we don’t consciously realize this, and what happens is we procrastinate on our goals until it compounds into a serious problem. If that’s the case for you, it’s time to relook into your goals. There’s no point in pursuing goals that no longer inspire you. Trash away your old goals (or just put them aside) and ask yourself what you really want now. Then go for them.

3. Give Yourself a Break

When’s the last time you took a real break for yourself? 3 months? 6 months? 1 year? Never? Perhaps it’s time to take a time-out. Prolonged working can cause someone to become disillusioned as they lose sight of who they are and what they want.

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Go take some extended leave from work. A few days at bare minimum; a few weeks or months will be great. Some of my ex-colleagues have quit their jobs and took months out to do some self-reflection. Of course, some of us might not have that luxury, so we can stick to a few weeks of leave. Go on a trip elsewhere and get away from your work and your life. Use this chance to get a renewed perspective of life. Think about your life purpose, what you want and what you want to create for your life in the future. These are big questions that require deep thinking over them. It’s not about finding the answers at one go, but about taking the first step to finding the answers.

4. Shake up Your Routines

Being in the same environment, doing the same things over and over again and meeting the same people can make us stagnant. This is especially if the people you spend the most time with are stagnant themselves.

Change things around. Start with simple things, like taking a different route to work and eating something different for breakfast. Have your lunch with different colleagues, colleagues you never talked much with. Work in a different cubicle if your work has free and easy seating. Do something different than your usual for weekday evenings and weekends. Cultivate different habits, like exercising every day, listening to a new series of podcasts every morning to work, reading a book, etc (here’s 6 Proven Ways To Make New Habits Stick). The different contexts will give you different stimulus, which will trigger off different thoughts and actions in you.

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When I’m in a state of stagnancy, I’ll get a sense of what’s making me stagnate. Sometimes it’s the environment I’m in, sometimes it’s the people I’ve been hanging out with, sometimes it’s my lifestyle. Most of the times it’s a combination of all these. Changing them up helps to stir myself out of the stagnant mode.

5. Start with a Small Step

Stagnation also comes from being frozen in fear. Maybe you do want this certain goal, but you aren’t taking action. Are you overwhelmed by the amount of work needed? Are you afraid you will make mistakes? Is the perfectionist in you taking over and paralyzing you?

Let go of the belief that it has to be perfect. Such a belief is a bane, not a boon. It’s precisely from being open to mistakes and errors that you move forward. Break down what’s before you into very very small steps, then take those small steps, a little step at a time. I had a client who had been stagnating for a long period because he was afraid of failing. He didn’t want to make another move where he would make a mistake. However, not wanting to make a mistake has led him to do absolutely nothing for 2-3 years. On the other hand, by doing just something, you would already be making progress, whether it’s a mistake or not. Even if you make a supposed “mistake”,  you get feedback to do things differently in the next step. That’s something you would never have known if you never made a move.

More to Help You Stay Motivated

Here are some resources that will help you break out of your current phase:

Featured photo credit: Anubhav Saxena via unsplash.com

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