Advertising

10 Things Highly Likeable Bosses Do Differently

10 Things Highly Likeable Bosses Do Differently
Advertising

Did you know that highly likable bosses are still a rare commodity? If you would like to be in that category, look at these sobering statistics for a moment.

According to one survey carried out by Accenture, 31% of workers leave because they do not like their boss. In the Gulf states, that number rises to 44%. That is almost half! Looks like an uphill task. Read on to discover what highly likable bosses do differently.

1. They cut meetings to a minimum.

Workers hate meetings and resent the amount of time spent on them. Intelligent managers know this and are aware that a whopping 37% of employee time is spent on meetings.  They prune meetings to a bare minimum and ensure that there is a time limit on them. Bosses chair the meetings to make sure this happens and adhere strictly to the agenda.

2. They are accessible.

Some bosses build a cordon round themselves. They have minions who slavishly keep people out. The message is that the bosses are busy and staff naturally feel that they cannot easily approach them with a problem.  It is a well established fact that employees work much better for a boss they like and respect.

Popular bosses welcome suggestions from staff and always have an open door policy, which they actually put into practice. They understand that the key to any successful business is a happy, motivated staff who are consulted and appreciated.

Advertising

“A leader is best when people barely know he exists, not so good when people obey and acclaim him, worse when they despise him. But of a good leader who talks little when his work is done, his aim fulfilled, they will say: We did it ourselves.” —Lao-Tzu

3. They are 100% reliable.

Reliability is a two-way process. It permeates a successful company. But the highly likeable bosses know that they have to deliver on the following:

  • decisions are followed through
  • tasks are completed on time
  • they are prepared and on the ball
  • they are punctual
  • they lead their teams with a mix of persuasion and firmness

“You do not lead by hitting people over the head—that’s assault, not leadership.” —Dwight Eisenhower

4. They delegate successfully.

The key to successful delegation is that bosses know what to let go, so that they can concentrate on top priorities. They also know that they can delegate the task to employees and show them that this is developing their skills and training. Employees see a delegated task as an opportunity for empowerment and a great chance to acquire new skills. They also realize how their work fits into the bigger picture. Highly likeable bosses can do this very skilfully.

“Delegating work works, provided the one delegating works, too.” —Robert Half

5. They are flexible.

Interesting research shows that where employees have flexible bosses, they suffer fewer health problems. It has a positive effect in less absenteeism too.

Employees need more flexibility when it comes to caring for sick children or parents. They should also be given the possibility of choosing their work schedule if it does not interfere with offering customer service or productivity.

6. They are optimistic and positive.

Successful managers exude confidence and optimism. They may do that instinctively but there are sound reasons for doing so. They know that optimism is infectious and can motivate employees to be more enthusiastic and focused. Keeping these thoughts to the forefront can produce better results and happier staff.

The research by Dr. Martin Seligman is very interesting in this regard. He says that everybody must make a real effort to look at the positive aspects and opportunities rather than moaning about all the obstacles. The managers who can inspire their staff to do just that will become successful and highly likeable.

“Positive thinking will let you do everything better than negative thinking will.” —Zig Ziglar

 7. They are friendly.

Highly likeable bosses take an interest in their staff. They are great at remembering important events in people’s lives and can celebrate with them.

They also know that negative forces such as dislike, resentment and bitterness can lead to poor performance and can be extremely contagious. This is why these wise bosses do everything they can to be friendly and create goodwill without giving up on objectives and deadlines.

“The boss depends on authority, the leader depends on goodwill.” —Anon

8. They are compassionate.

Many bosses try to be tough and want to show that they are still in control. If a person is always late, they will sack them on the spot.

But popular and compassionate bosses take a much more intelligent and humane approach. They first explain that unpunctuality is having a knock on negative effect on productivity, staff morale and relationships. They then ask the employee to implement changes and give them a deadline to improve. This creates less resentment and is a much better way of dealing with a difficult issue.

Advertising

9. They show appreciation and thanks.

When work is done well, intelligent bosses know that a short congratulatory email is the right way to express their appreciation. This encourages employees to do even better. It can also be used in their assessment and is a powerful motivational tool.

Showing gratitude pays handsome dividends. One survey by Glassdoor showed that 80% want to work harder when they are thanked for their achievements. That figure fell to 40% when the bosses were unpopular, demanding, and ungrateful.

10. They are charismatic.

It is difficult to define what charisma is, yet we know it when we see it. Highly likeable bosses are charismatic. They are self-confident, open and friendly. You can feel their presence in a room immediately. Their body language is as confident as they are. They have a real gift in listening to you and making you feel important. They are empathetic to a very high degree.

Now, if you are a highly likeable boss and meet all the above criteria, congratulations! If not, at least you now know what you need to work on.

Advertising

Featured photo credit: Annual Volunteer Appreciation Ceremony / USAG – Humphreys via Photo Pin

More by this author

Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

10 Morning Habits Of Happy People 12 Ways to Work Smarter, Not Harder to Be More Productive 10 Reasons Why People Are Unmotivated (And How to Be Motivated) 10 Simple Morning Exercises to Make You Feel Great All Day What Your Fear of Being Alone Is Really About and How to Get over It

Trending in Productivity

1 7 Effective Ways To Motivate Employees in 2021 2 5 Values of an Effective Leader 3 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 4 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work) 5 30 Practical Ideas to Create Your Best Morning Routine

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on July 21, 2021

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
Advertising

No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

Advertising

From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

Advertising

The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

Advertising

But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

How to Make a Reminder Works for You

Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

Advertising

Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

More on Building Habits

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Advertising

Reference

[1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

Read Next