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10 Freelance Jobs Anyone Can Do To Easily Make Extra Money

10 Freelance Jobs Anyone Can Do To Easily Make Extra Money

Whether you have a great job you love that just doesn’t pay a lot, you need to find a new job or you need some extra money to tide you over during a tough time, freelance jobs can be a great way to make up the difference. Believe it or not, there are a lot of ways to make extra cash and very few of them require any special skills or training. Depending on your interests and what you have available to you, you can try a few different things or concentrate on one. Who knows? Maybe you’ll end up with a new career.

1. Social Media Guru

Believe it or not, your time on Facebook, Twitter and other social media websites can actually pay off. Offer your services to businesses as a social media expert — assuming you are one and understand the types of social media out there – you can write blog posts, Facebook posts, Tweets and other messages for companies that don’t have time to keep up with their social media platforms. Check out just what you need to be a social media guru here. A social media guru can charge per post or per month, often as much as $150 per brand per month.

dude perfect

    2. Yard Work

    Post a sign on the board at the grocery store, post in groups on Facebook and let everyone know that you can weed, mow, weed whack or whatever. Those who do yard work for a job often charge by the job, so call around and find out what others in your area are charging and adjust your prices accordingly.

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    mower

      3. Trash to Treasure

      Do you have a flair for turning something old into something new? Start refurbishing old furniture and other items. Add knobs to old dressers, paint them bright colors and resell them for a profit. You’d be amazed at how much you can make at a local flea market doing something like this. An old dresser you buy for $20 at a yard sale can turn into a $200 item.

      furniture

        4. Teach

        Can you play the piano? Knit? Take brilliant pictures? Offer classes. Talk with someone at your local library or community center and set up class times. Piano or other music lessons are frequently about $20 per half hour. If you’re not sure what to charge, look up similar classes in a nearby town.

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        piano and drawing

          5. Babysit

          Parents always need extra help in this department. If you have some time available in your day or night, you could offer babysitting services for local families. Make sure you are familiar with first aid and CPR first and then hang out your shingle. If you want to do something more permanent or long-term, check with your state about laws for child care. Babysitters make different amounts in different areas but can charge between $5 and $10 an hour depending on where you live and how many kids you are watching at once.

          babysit

            6. Petsitting/Walking

            Dogwalking is a great service to offer those who are away for a long time during the day. It’s also a great way to stay in shape. You can also add petsitting services and if you’re not squeamish, dog poop scooping services. Dog walkers frequently get about $20 per hour, depending on location. Petsitters often charge per visit – usually about $20 per day depending on what your duties will be.

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            pet sitting

              7. Head to the fair

              Summertime is fair and festival time. Do you have a craft you make that you would be willing to make a lot of? Do you bake or make fudge? Try your hand at making fudge and bring it to the fairs and festivals in your area. You could make hundreds of dollars — maybe more — over a weekend, depending on the festival. Make sure to investigate your state rules first regarding cottage food industries if you are making edibles.

              baking

                8. Tutoring

                Were you a math whiz in high school? Do you understand the intricacies of chemistry? Many students could use a helping hand in a lot of these subjects and you might be just the person to help them out. You could make $10 or so an hour and be a real boon to a student who is struggling.

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                tutoring

                  9. Videographer/Photographer

                  Have a flair with a camera? From weddings to parties to receptions of all sorts, many organizations need someone to photo or video their events. Become familiar with your equipment and offer to do the first one or two jobs for the cost of gas and you will have a portfolio upon which you can build.

                  photographer

                    10. Running errands

                    Moms, seniors, folks that work out of town often, frequently need someone to help them get those little things done. You could drive senior citizens to appointments or go shopping for or with them. You could pick up someone else’s dry cleaning while you drop off someone else’s prescriptions. Put up flyers, post on Facebook and Craigslist. You’d be amazed at how much people are willing to pay for an extra hand now and again. Start by charging a basic rate – $5 per errand, for example, depending on the errand – or $20 for an hour of shopping plus delivery. Adjust your rates as you run more errands and find more need for your services.

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                      More by this author

                      Michelle Kennedy Hogan

                      Michelle is an explorer, editor, author of 15 books, and mom of eight.

                      8 Things to Remember When You Don’t Know What to Do with Your Life 30 Fun Things To Do With Your Friends Without Spending Much 10 Benefits of Deadlifts You Probably Never Knew 9 Benefits of Jumping Rope You Probably Don’t Know 9 Signs It’s Time to Quit Your Job

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                      Last Updated on March 4, 2019

                      How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

                      How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

                      Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

                      I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

                      Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

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                      Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

                      Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

                      Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

                      I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

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                      I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

                      If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

                      Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

                      The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

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                      Using Credit Cards with Rewards

                      Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

                      You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

                      I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

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                      So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

                      What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

                      Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

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