Advertising
Advertising

8 Crucial Financial Moves To Make In Your 30’s

8 Crucial Financial Moves To Make In Your 30’s

Your 20’s were fun, maybe too fun.  Now that the dust has settled and you’re part of the real world, here are eight crucial financial moves you must make this decade:

1.  Invest in Yourself

This is the time to separate from the pack.  Spend some of that hard earned money wisely to gain the advanced education, industry certification or specialized job skills necessary to make yourself more qualified, more marketable and ultimately indispensible.

Georgetown’s Center on Education and the Workforce 2011 study found workers with Graduate Degrees make as much as $35,000 more in the same field as their counterparts with only Bachelor’s Degrees (http://cew.georgetown.edu/whatsitworth).

Just because that diploma hangs on your office wall doesn’t mean you’re done learning.  Do what your colleagues won’t do and spend the extra money and time to collect more arrows in your quiver.

2.  Establish an Emergency Fund

Human nature seeks immediate gratification.  True financial security and success comes from training yourself to delay that gratification until a future date.  Having an emergency account for those unexpected expenses keeps you from borrowing and gives you invaluable peace of mind.

This can be a daunting task so start your emergency fund with small amounts at a time.  Make your morning coffee at home four days a week and splurge only on Friday.  Nix all those cable channels you never watch.  Skip the lunches out every day and bring food from home.

Advertising

Now put these savings into a new account labeled “Emergency Savings.”  You’re less likely to pull funds from this account frivolously when you’re constantly reminded that it’s for emergencies only.

3.  Stick to a Budget

It’s not sexy but a little self-control and discipline will make your 40’s and 50’s much more enjoyable.  Add kids, school costs, summer camps, etc. and the cushy lifestyle of your 20’s will be a distant memory.  Prepare for this in advance by understanding where your money goes and what you can do to keep more of it.

Setting a budget is more an exercise in discipline more so than tracking every single penny.  There are tons of budget software programs and expense tracking sites out there.  My personal favorite is Mint (www.mint.com). An old saying that rings true to this day says “First we make our habits, then our habits make us.”

4.  Maximize Retirement Savings

If your workplace offers a matching 401k or similar program, you’re a fool to give up free money.  Take advantage of this gift.

Once you’ve contributed enough to get the match and you have an Emergency Fund established, you should consider diverting more towards your retirement accounts.  In traditional 401k, IRA and similar retirement accounts, your investments grow tax deferred until you take income during retirement.  Ask your investment professional about where your money is being invested and pay attention to fees.  You don’t need to be an expert but you need to take responsibility and understand what’s going on — this is your retirement after all.

There are hundreds of calculators you can test but suffice it to say that waiting until you’re 40 to start these retirement savings will leave you at a terrible disadvantage.  Albert Einstein was spot on when he pegged Compound Interest as the Eighth Wonder of the World.

Advertising

5.  Manage Financial Risks

Forget about that fancy car you’re driving, the purse collection and your “priceless” vinyl collection.  Your single most valuable asset is your future earnings potential – your ability to make money.

You insure that car, those records and you’d have a conniption if something happened to your handbag.  So why not protect yourself in the same way?

Review your disability and life insurance protection for the sake of your current or future family.  Often times the coverage offered through employee benefits may not be sufficient.  Take a few minutes to complete a disability or life insurance needs analysis and see for yourself (http://www.lifehappens.org/insurance-overview/life-insurance/calculate-your-needs/).

6.  Take Control of Your Credit Cards

This one is simple.  Not easy, but simple.

Carrying credit card balances forces you to pay high interest rates, which, in turn, creates even higher credit card balances.  Break this vicious cycle and use credit cards only when absolutely necessary.

Don’t misunderstand me.  Credit cards serve a very useful purpose but they should be treated as a tool, not the tool.  I speak from experience in saying it’s easy to swipe the card and not think about the consequences.  Do that enough in your 30’s and you can kiss retirement goodbye.

Advertising

7.  Understand Good Debt and Bad Debt

In your 30’s, assume debt with extreme caution.  If you’re like most of us 30 somethings, you still have some cleanup from your 20’s to address — don’t make the problem any worse.

Taking on Debt for a quality home purchase, higher education or similar future-focused asset may be wise.  Borrowing money at high interest rates for a new car, those designer shades or for your dream vacation almost never makes financial sense.  The real danger is that these short-term decisions are often the more fun and offer instant gratification but leave you reeling afterwards (see #7 above).

General Rule:

Good Debt = used as leverage towards improved value long term

Bad Debt = used in lieu of cash savings you don’t have to buy something you can’t afford whose value will never be greater than at the time of purchase

8.  Give Back

This may seem crazy or even impossible given the constraints of your everyday life.  Trust me when I say you’ll get more in return than you can ever imagine by giving to those in need.

Advertising

Make a regular donation to your favorite local charity.  Don’t have one?  Use a resource like Charity Navigator (http://www.charitynavigator.org) to find a cause near and dear.

If money is tight, consider volunteering your time or your expertise to and organization in need.  Public Relations?  Graphic Designer?  Appliance Technician?  All charities, nonprofits and organizations for the greater good need these services just like any other business.

Arthur Ashe famously said “From what we get we can make a living; what we give, however, makes a life.”

 

Everyone lives a different life and should take their own personal circumstances, careers and families into consideration before making any significant financial decisions — in your 30’s or at any other time.  Consider meeting with a financial professional who may be able to help shape good money habits in this crucial decade.

Featured photo credit: Gratisography via gratisography.com

More by this author

4 Simple Ways to Save Enough for Retirement These 8 Everyday Financial Worries Have One Common Solution 10 Online Financial Calculators You Never Knew That Could Make Your Life Easier 8 Crucial Financial Moves To Make In Your 30’s

Trending in Money

1 How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt 2 How to Use Debt Snowball to Get out from a Financial Avalanche 3 How Personal Finance Software Helps You Get More Out of Your Money 4 The Best Ways to Save Money Even Impulsive Spenders Can Get Behind 5 How to Answer the Tough Question: What are Your Salary Requirements?

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 4, 2019

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

How to Use Credit Cards While Staying Out of Debt

Many people will suggest that the best thing to do with your credit cards during these tough economic times is to cut them up with a pair of scissors. Indeed, if you are already in huge debt, you probably should stop using them and begin a payback strategy immediately. However, if you are not currently in trouble with your credit cards, there are wise ways to use them.

I happen to really love my credit cards so I will share with you my approach to how I use mine without getting into deep financial trouble.

Ever since about 1983 when I got my first Visa card, I continue to charge as many of my purchases as possible on credit. Everything from gas, groceries and monthly payments for services like my cable and home security monitoring are charged on credit. Despite my heavy usage, I have maintained the joy of never paying any interest fees at all on any of my credit cards.

Advertising

Here are some tips on how best to use your credit cards without falling into the trap of paying those nasty double-digit interest fees.

Do Not Treat Credit Cards as Your Funding Sources

Too many people treat their credit cards as funding sources for major purchases. Do not do this if you want to stay out of trouble. I use my credit cards as convenient financial instruments so I do not have to carry around much cash. In fact, I hate carrying cash, especially coins. When you buy things on credit, the purchases are clean and you will not get annoying coins back as change.

I do not rely on my Visa, MasterCard or American Express to fund any of my purchases, large or small. This brings me to my golden rule when it comes to whether I will pull out any of my credit cards either at a retail or online store.

Advertising

I never purchase anything with my credit cards if I do not have the actual cash on hand in my bank account.

If I really cannot pay for the item or service with cash that I already have at the bank, then I simply will not make the purchase. Remember, my credit cards are not used as funding sources. They are just convenient alternatives to actual cash in my pocket.

Make Sure to Always Pay Off Balances in Full Each Month

The next very important part of my overall strategy is to make absolutely sure that I pay the balances in full each and every month no matter how large they are. This should never be a problem if the cash has been budgeted for my purchases and secured in the bank. I have always paid my full balances each month ever since my very first credit card and this is why I never pay interest charges.

Advertising

Using Credit Cards with Rewards

Most of my credit cards are of the “no annual fees” type, including one MasterCard on a separate account I keep at home as a spare in case I lose my wallet or incur any fraudulent charges. However, I do use a main Visa card which does have an annual fee because all purchases on that card reward me with airline frequent flyer points. For me, the annual fee is worth it since I do travel and I get enough points to redeem many free flights.

You have to decide for yourself if you will charge enough purchases on credit each year without paying interest charges to warrant a credit card that rewards you with airline points (or other rewards). In my case, the answer is “yes” but that might not be the case for you.

I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.

Advertising

So this is how I use my credit cards without getting into any financial trouble with them. This strategy is recommended only if you are not in debt, of course. In fact, it is worth keeping in mind once you’re out of debt so that you can keep your credit cards active and treat them responsibly.

What are your credit card usage strategies? Let me know in the comments — I’d love to hear what methods you use.

Featured photo credit: Artem Bali via unsplash.com

Read Next