Advertising
Advertising

The 11 Organizing Stations You Need In Your Home

The 11 Organizing Stations You Need In Your Home

Are you a feeling a bit disorganized at home? Can you never seem to find a pair of scissors, your smartphone charger, or perhaps a roll of gift wrap when you need it?

Creating organizing stations at home helps corral and contain commonly used household items. You’ll always have what you need at your fingertips and you’ll know exactly where to look for items when you need them.

Advertising

Read on for a couple of organizing station basics as well as a list of 11 common and helpful household stations:

Advertising

Station Building Basics

  • Think location and containment.
    Your organizing stations should be located in a room or area of the house where they will be most needed or used. Contain your supplies using baskets, boxes, plastic bins, tubs and the like. Depending on how much space you have, a cleared off shelf in a bookcase, nook, closet or pantry, or even a small mounted shelf on the wall might just do the trick to store your station supplies.
  • It’s not about size.
    You might have a small or a large amount of space to use for your stations, but remember it’s not about size; it’s about having the necessary materials readily at hand for your needs. A scaled-back or smaller version of one of the stations below can still be extremely helpful.
  • Mix and match stations as needed.
    The below stations are only a general suggestion; feel free to incorporate items from different stations to create your own unique multi-task station.

The 11 Organizing Stations You Need In Your Home

  • Mailing/Correspondence/Bill Paying Station
    This is for all those random paper and correspondence items that pass through your home. You could create an area on a desk, on your kitchen counter, or on a side table near the front door. Items you might want to include in this station: notepads, envelopes, pens, pencils, stationery, scrap paper, stamps, paper clips, scissors, stapler, bubble mailers, flat Manila envelopes, packing tape, clear cellophane tape, measuring tape, checkbook and calculator.
  • Wardrobe Station
    Clothing scrapes and mishaps are bound to happen. Be ready for any wardrobe malfunction so you can look your best. Items you might want to include in this station: safety pins of all sizes, straight pins, lint roller, fashion tape, various threads and needles, buttons, small pair of scissors, clear nail polish (a quick-fix for hosiery runs), nail file, small mirror, shoe polish, shoe brushes and old rags.
  • Fix-It Station
    Ever have to tighten a bolt or hammer a nail in your home? Keep things in ship-shape order with this station. Items you might want to include in this station: scissors, duct tape, masking tape, paper and wood glue, scratch eraser, heavy-duty permanent glue, permanent marker, laundry marker, hammer, wrench, screwdrivers, twine, thin ribbon or string, twisty ties, thumbtacks, ruled or measuring tape, level, pins, batteries, garbage bags and wax.
  • Cleaning House Station
    Light dusting and house upkeep was never easier with this helpful station. Items you might want to include in this station: heavy-duty cleaning wipes, paper towels, old rags, dusters, gloves, cleaning sprays gels, cleaning brushes/scrubber, apron or old shirt, covering for your hair, masks and garbage bags.
  • Gift Wrap Station
    Birthday, anniversaries, or impromptu parties, you’ll be ready to wrap and roll out the door in no time! Items you might want to include in this station: wrapping paper, tissue paper, ribbon, bows, silk flowers, gift bags, tape, scissors, cards, envelopes, twine or string, glue, labels, gift cards in different denominations from various stores, pens and markers.
  • Charging Station
    The digital age requires a place for you to effectively charge your devices and be prepared for emergencies. Items you might want to include in this station: extension cords, power strip, batteries of all sorts for your different devices, chargers for various devices at home, flashlights, instruction manuals, candles, matches, travel adapters and headphones/earbuds.
  • Bag Drop Station
    A bag drop is a great a place to temporarily store your personal belongings when you’re in transit. Items you might want to include or keep at this station: purse or wallet holder, house keys, car keys, sunglasses, cell phone, cell phone charger.
  • Child’s School Station
    Make sure your children have a place to put their belongings after school and on weekends. Items you might want to include in this station: backpacks, lunchboxes, schoolbooks and notes, surplus school supplies (notebooks, pens, pencils, crayons, calculators, paper, etc.) sports and music equipment.
  • Recycling Station
    It’s easy to reduce, reuse and recycle with this handy station. Items you might want to include in this station: different bins for recycling glass, metal and paper, paper shredder, clear and black garbage bags, scissors, twine, twisty ties, tape measure.
  • Car/Travel Station
    A great station or area for those impromptu road trips. Items you might want to include in this station: tissues, paper towels, wipes, chargers and adapters for your devices, paper maps, non-perishable snacks, water bottles, plastic utensils and straws, zippered plastic bags, small garbage bags, car manual and copies of insurance and registration.
  • Health/Wellness Station
    A collection of items for your comfort when you are out and about in the great big world! Items you might want to include in this station: hand lotion or salve, contact lens solution, eye drops, tissues, baby wipes, antibacterial gel, sunblock, lip balm, cough drops or throat lozenges, bobby pins, hair elastics, pain reliever of your choice, antacid, back up medication dosages, small water bottle.

What other stations might you set up in your home so you can find what you need in a pinch?

Advertising

Advertising

More by this author

Rashelle Isip

Blogger, Consultant, and Author

10 Helpful Tips To Effectively Declutter Your Home 15 Bad Habits Which Always Destroy Your Productivity Everyone Should Know These 10 Tips Before Returning To Work After Vacation 15 Useful Tips To Defeat Procrastination, Once And For All Here’s How To Define Your Own Success

Trending in Home

1 30 Awesome DIY Projects that You’ve Never Heard of 2 5 Reasons Why Tidying Your Room Can Change Your Life 3 25 Really Cool Cat Furniture Design Ideas Every Cat Owner Needs 4 Scientists Discover Why You Should Take Off Your Shoes Before Entering Your Home 5 5 Ways to Deal with Snow Runoff in the Garage

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

Advertising

3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

Advertising

6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

Advertising

9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

Advertising

Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

Read Next