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MASSIVELY Boost Your Metabolism To Incredible Heights With This Method

MASSIVELY Boost Your Metabolism To Incredible Heights With This Method

When it comes to losing weight, everyone is curious about speeding up their metabolism – and for good reason! Who wouldn’t want their metabolism jacked-up all day like when you were young… or younger? The advice here may not be so helpful to those trying to gain weight. However, this article will help make losing weight so much easier!

Besides the supplements that you see everywhere, there are NATURAL ways to get your metabolism ramped up – including thermogenic foods and exercise. When it comes to exercise, there is a training method that will have you busting through calories over 38 hours after your workout is finished (Schuenke et al 2002)! I’m talking about burning over 150 extra calories (Bahr & Sejersted 1991)! This method is called EPOC training.

Remember to get examined by you physician before beginning any exercise program. Make sure you are cleared for this sort of physical activity.

EPOC Training

EPOC (Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption) is also commonly referred to as the afterburn effect. During this process your body attempts to return itself to how it was before your workout (commonly called your natural resting state) as quickly as possible. This includes energy re-synthesis, muscle repair, and lactic acid removal – all of which require energy. Basically, EPOC is measured by the extra oxygen you consume to perform these tasks. This breaks down to roughly 5 calories burned for every extra liter of oxygen you consume (Vella & Kravitz 2004).

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Do you want to boost your metabolism long after your workout is over via the EPOC effect? Well, in order to elicit a decent EPOC response we need to focus on:

  1. Workout Intensity
  2. Workout Duration
  3. Training Method

Workout Intensity

EPOC is all about intensity; which makes complete sense considering that EPOC is all about returning your body to its resting state. The higher the intensity of your workouts, the greater the magnitude of your EPOC effect will be. You might ask, “What exactly constitutes high-intensity?” Well, that’s a great question! Let’s delve into some answers.

A simple way to tell if you are working out at a high enough intensity is to refer to science. In 1990 Kaminsky and associates found that an EPOC response was elicited when exercising at a 70% to 75% of your VO2 max. Of course it could also be elicited at a lower VO2 max, but we will go with the proven one. VO2 max is an overall indicator of your physical fitness. In other words, the higher your VO2 max is, the more “fit” you are. This is normally determined by intricate lab equipment, which I doubt you will be using at your local gym. So you will need a way to determine our VO2 max easily during our workout.

Thankfully, there is a super easy way to determine your heart rate that is correlated to that specific VO2 max. Although it isn’t 100% accurate, it’s still a good estimate. You can do this using this calculator which will determine the heart-rate you need to maintain during your workout. This heart-rate is quite high because we are going for super high-intensity and therefore a bigger EPOC effect.

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Workout Duration

The second variable that we need to monitor (in order to induce a massive EPOC effect) is maintaining your high-intensity for at least 20 minutes. We get this number from a 1994 Quinn and associates study which found that an EPOC effect was induced when people performed exercise at a high-intensity for 20, 40, or 60 minutes. Some of the most encouraging evidence wass the fact that those who exercised for 20 minutes (1/3 of the time) received over half of the EPOC benefits as those that worked out for 60 minutes. This time trade-off allows us to continue with the afterburn effect, while not spending hours in the gym! That said, if you have the extra time and still desire to increase the magnitude of your EPOC effect, just exercise longer.

Training Method

Finally, I’ll discuss the actual method of exercise that you should be performing. Most people instantly think that running intervals would be the ideal way to ramp up your metabolism. In fact, the best way to increase your EPOC effect is via strength training, and more specifically circuit training (Murphy & Schwarzkopf 1992).

Strength training in general is a must. Even if you aren’t trying to increase your metabolism with this specific practise it is still pivotal to your well-being since it also builds muscle, increases strength, burns calories, and builds bones. When you combine strength training with circuits you also speed up your metabolism because your heart rate is elevated the entire time. And you’re working your tail off! You can make your strength training workout more “circuit-esque” by super setting all of your sets so that you are basically moving from one opposing muscle group to the other, with little to no rest between sets. You will be pumped and winded – trust me!

Wrap-Up

Discovering the right method to induce an EPOC effect and boost your metabolism in a timely manner boils down to 3 main ingredients:

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  1. Workout at a 70-75% VO2max
  2. Keep that intensity for at least 20 minutes
  3. Strength train/circuit train

Because these workouts are so intense and can be so taxing on your body you shouldn’t perform them every day. Why would you need to, when your metabolism could be boosted for 38 hours anyways? Instead, perform an EPOC workout 2-3 times a week (time dependent).  You can even create your very own full-body circuit workout from any of these exercises and go from there!

If you want to boost your metabolism NATURALLY, there really is no better away than the EPOC method. Although the workouts are very taxing they can set you up for a massive metabolism boost!

Train smarter with EPOC training!

Citations

Bahr R, Sejersted OM (1991) Effect of intensity of exercise on excess postexercise oxygen consumption. Metabolism 40: 836–41.

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Kaminsky LA, Padjen S, LaHam-Saeger J (1990) Effect of split exercise sessions on excess postexercise oxygen consumption. Brit J Sports Med 24: 95-98.

Murphy E, Schwarzkopf R (1992) Effects of standard set and circuit weight training on excess postexercise oxygen consumption. J Appl Sport Sci Res 6: 88-91.

Quinn TJ, Vroman NB, Kertzer R (1994) Postexercise oxygen consumption in trained females: Effect of exercise duration. Med Sci Spots Exer 26: 908-913.

Schuenke MD, Mikat RP, McBride JM (2002) Effect of an acute period of resistance exercise on excess post-exercise oxygen consumption: Implications for body mass management. Eur J Appl Physiol 86: 411-417.

Vella CA, Kravitz L (2004) Exercise after-burn: A research update. IDEA Fit J 1.5: 42-47.

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Last Updated on March 13, 2019

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

1. Work on the small tasks.

When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

2. Take a break from your work desk.

Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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3. Upgrade yourself

Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

4. Talk to a friend.

Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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6. Paint a vision to work towards.

If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

7. Read a book (or blog).

The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

8. Have a quick nap.

If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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9. Remember why you are doing this.

Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

10. Find some competition.

Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

11. Go exercise.

Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

12. Take a good break.

Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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