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Like Thrills and Chills? These are 12 Of The Spookiest Places In The United States

Like Thrills and Chills? These are 12 Of The Spookiest Places In The United States

As a huge fan of the show Supernatural, you’d think I’d be immune to scary stuff. I make an exception, however, when it comes to the places on this list. There are just some patches of Earth living humans aren’t meant to visit…lest you wish to face the consequences.

Read on below if you dare.

1. The Moundsville Penitentiary, Moundsville, West Virginia

12SPSTSSV#1

    There’s a reason why most ghost hunter shows spend multiple episodes perusing the terrifying hallways of decrepit penitentiaries: tons of people died in them. Not only that, but they’re usually eerie to look at and their interiors are poorly lit. Moundsville is a prime example of this, being both creepy on the outside and inside, and having had more than a handful of folks die excruciating deaths within its walls. Best steer clear unless you want to come face to face with one of the old inmates…

    2. Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum, Weston, West Virginia

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    12SPSTSSV#2

      Anything built in the 19th century is haunted (according to movie and television logic), and so it makes sense that this building, assembled in 1864, is rife with ghost activity. Apparently, there are so many poor souls wandering its deteriorating hallways that locals host overnight ghost-hunting sessions there for visitors and locals on a daily basis.

      3. Clinton Road, West Milford, New Jersey

      12SPSTSSV#3

        Unfortunately (or fortunately), the scares here don’t have anything to do with the former President. This stretch of road in New Jersey is apparently so haunted that drivers see everything from ghosts and phantom vehicles to the spirit of a boy who tries to lure you to your death. At the very least, don’t try to traverse this stretch of asphalt with a bicycle…

        4. The Ohio State Reformatory, Mansfield, Ohio

        12SPSTSSV#4

          Built in 1896 (no surprise there), this prison was finally closed in 1990 after years of outcry in regard to the horrific conditions within its crumbling walls. Though it’s now devoid of living inmates, it is said that those who died within still roam its rusted corridors. The hauntings become more terrifying the closer you get to the solitary confinement section, a region within the Reformatory where people report seeing the emaciated visages of former prisoners flickering in and out of their vision.

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          5. Waverly Hills Sanatorium, Louisville, Kentucky

          12SPSTSSV#5

            Sanatoriums, asylums, reformatories, oh my! This facility was built to deal with tuberculosis, and many experimental procedures were tested here (unsuccessfully, I might add). This led to a host of untimely deaths among the sick, who reportedly still reside where they died, waiting to exact revenge on those whose ill-conceived treatments killed them.

            6. The Lizzie Borden House, Fall River, Massachusetts

            12SPSTSSV#6

              Another haunted building straight out of the 19th century. Lizzie Borden’s parents were killed by an axe murderer, who, after some investigating, seemed likely to be Lizzie herself. She was never convicted, living out her life alone, ostracized by the community. To this day, it is believed that the ghosts of her mangled parents remain in her childhood home, which was later converted to a bed-and-breakfast (you’d have to pay me to stay there). I went with using the slightly grainy era-authentic photo over a modern day one for added spookiness.

              7. Mission San Miguel, San Luis Obispo, California

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              12SPSTSSV#7

                In the sleepy medium-sized town of San Luis Obispo lies Mission San Miguel. At one point in its history, the mission was secularized and sold to a civilian named Reed. Unfortunately for Reed, word got around that he carried a sack of gold with him at all times, which attracted robbers to his property. They looted his gold, killed him and his family, and left their remains scattered around the mission. These bodily remnants were later gathered and buried in the mission’s cemetery. Reed and his family continue to inhabit the ancient structure, seeking retribution.

                8. The Stanley Hotel, Estes Park, Colorado

                12SPSTSSV#8

                  This is the place featured in The Shining, but that alone isn’t what makes it haunted. Many report strange incidents occurring throughout the structure, especially in the ballroom, where such inexplicable things take place that even the most experienced ghost hunters are left bamboozled. This is one hotel that might end up becoming a permanent residence.

                  9. The Grave of the Female Stranger, Alexandria, Virginia

                  12SPSTSSV#9

                    19th century people were spooky, as I’ve pointed out several times now. This grave was given its name because the women buried there wanted to remain entirely anonymous, for an unknown reason. The story goes as follows: a man and his wife reached the United States by ship in 1816. They disembarked in Alexandria, Virginia (before their intended destination) because the wife was deathly ill. Here’s the unsettling part: from the moment she left the ship and stepped foot on Alexandrian soil, to the hour of her death, the wife donned a thick veil that obscured her face. Even local physicians (who were unable to help her) were sworn to secrecy in regard to the woman’s identity. When death inevitably came, the husband took it upon himself to bury his wife, ensuring her anonymity. A veiled figure is said to haunt the surrounding area to this day, her identity still unknown.

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                    10. The Villisca Axe Murder House, Villisca, Iowa

                    12SPSTSSV#10

                      About two months after the Titanic sunk in 1912, eight people (a family of six and two guests) were found chopped to pieces within their home. Several suspects were questioned, but none were convicted. Today, the tiny home offers guests tours as well as the option to stay overnight, presumably in one of the rooms where murder was committed.

                      11. Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

                      12SPSTSSV#11

                        A  battlefield that remains mostly untouched nearly 150 years after the climactic battle that resulted in more than 50,000 deaths. Of particular interest is Devil’s Den, a place where bodies and body parts were discovered even years after the war. In some places, you can even see where blood dried on the rocks (I was there, I’ve seen it with my own eyes). Let’s just hope these ghosts aren’t equipped with working rifles.

                        12. Stepp Cemetery, Benton, Indiana

                        12SPSTSSV#12

                          A haunted cemetery in Indiana that’s said to be the site where several cults congregate. Not only that, but you can apparently spot a handful of ghosts among its crumbling headstones. One in particular is a mother who went to Stepp Cemetery to visit her dead infant. She was so distraught that she exhumed her child, gazed upon its corpse, and killed herself on the spot. It’s said she can still be seen weeping over the site where her child was originally buried. Best not to disturb her.

                          If you’re the sort of person who likes that cold feeling running down your spine as you glance over your shoulder at something half-seen, check these out for some eerie possibilities. Happy hauntings!

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                          Last Updated on October 16, 2018

                          The Ultimate Guide to Help You Sleep Through the Night Tonight

                          The Ultimate Guide to Help You Sleep Through the Night Tonight

                          It’s well past midnight and you’ve got to get up in less than six hours. You toss and turn all night. Before you know it, another hour passes by and you start panicking.

                          If I don’t get to sleep in the next 30 minutes, I’m going to be exhausted tomorrow!”

                          One thing is for sure, you’re not alone. Over 70M+ Americans have stated that they don’t get the proper sleep they need at night.[1] So what could possibly be causing this insomnia epidemic?

                          Throughout my entrepreneurial journey of building my language learning company, I have experimented and researched dozens of best sleep practices. Some have flopped but a few have dramatically improved the quality of my life and work.

                          In this article, I’ll look into the reason why you’re sleep deprived and how to sleep through the night tonight.

                          Why you can’t sleep through the night

                          The first step to improving anything is getting to the bottom of the root problem. Different studies have shown the reasons why most people cannot sleep well at night.[2] Here are the main ones that the average person faces:

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                          Stress

                          If you’ve ever stayed up at night worrying about something, know that it’s a major sleep inhibitor. When you’re feeling stress, your mind and body becomes more activated, making it incredibly difficult to fall asleep. Even when you do manage to sleep, it won’t be deep enough to help you feel rested the next day.

                          Exposure to blue light before sleep time

                          We’re exposed to harmful blue light on a daily basis through the use of our digital screens. If you’ve never heard of blue light, it’s part of the visible light spectrum that suppresses melatonin, our sleep hormones. Other harmful effects include digital eye strains and macular cellular damage.

                          While daytime exposure to blue light is not very harmful, night time exposure tricks our brain into thinking it’s daytime. By keeping your brain alert and suppressing melatonin, your mind is unable to shut down and relax before bedtime.

                          Eating close to bedtime

                          Eating too late can actually be an issue for many people, especially those who are older than 40. The reason is, eating before laying down increases the chances of Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), in which stomach acid backflows into the esophagus.

                          Another reason not to eat too late is sleep quality. Even if you manage to sleep right after eating, it’s likely that you’ll wake up tired. Instead of letting your body rest during sleep, it has to digest the food that was entered before bedtime.

                          Rule of thumb: eat 3-4 hours before bedtime.

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                          Medical conditions

                          In some cases, it could be medical conditions that cause your sleep problems. If you can’t relate yourself to the above reasons or any of these common sleep problem causes, you should visit the doctor.

                          The vicious sleep cycle

                          The biggest danger to repeating the bad habits mentioned above is the negative cycle that it can take you through. A bad night’s sleep can affect not only your energy but your willpower and decision making skills.

                          Here’s an example of a bad sleep pattern:

                          You get a bad night’s sleep
                          –> You feel tired and stressful throughout the day.
                          –> You compensate it with unhealthy habits (for example junk food, skipping exercises, watching Netflix etc.)
                          –> You can’t sleep well (again) the next night.

                            You can imagine what could happen if this cycle repeats over a longer period of time.

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                            How to sleep better (throughout the night)

                            To help you break the vicious cycle and stop waking up in the middle of the night, I’ll explain to you a list of actionable steps to solve your trouble staying asleep.

                            1. Take control over the last 90 minutes of your night

                            What you do (or don’t do) before bedtime have significant impact on the quality of your sleep. Many times, it can be the difference between staying up until 4am and sleeping like a baby.

                            Here are a few suggestions:

                            • Go from light to dark – Darkness stimulates production of the sleep hormone melatonin. Turn off unused light around the house, and think about investing into warm light that you can use in the bedroom before bedtime.
                            • Avoid screens (or wear blue light blocking glasses) – Keep the bedroom a technology-free zone as the light from electronic devices can disturb your sleep. If you need to work, wear blue light blocking glasses (also known as computer glasses) throughout or before you sleep to prevent sleep disruption.
                            • Find an activity that helps you to wind down  This could be anything that calms you down, and reduces thinking (especially unnecessary stress). Fir example, listening to soothing/good feel music, taking a hot bath, reading or meditating.
                            • Keep any electronics you have on the other side of the room or outside the room – One of the most harmful things that can disrupt your sleep is the notifications you get from your smartphones. The simplest way to avoid this is to keep it away from you.
                            • Create a bedtime routine – A night routine is a couple of things you do prior to going to bed. By doing these things every night, you’ll have a more restful and high-quality sleep. Learn how to pick up a night routine here: The Ultimate Night Routine Guide to Sleep Better and Wake Up Productive

                            2. Eat the right nutrients (and avoid the wrong ones)

                            What you eat (not just when we eat) plays a critical role in your sleep quality. If you’re ever in doubt of what to eat to improve your sleep, take the following into consideration:

                            • Kiwi – This green fruit may be the ultimate pre-bed snack. When volunteers ate two kiwis an hour before hitting the hay, they slept almost a full extra hour. Kiwis are full of vitamins C and E, serotonin and folate—all of which may help you snooze.
                            • Soy foods – Foods made with soy such as tofu, miso and edamame, are rich in isoflavones. These compounds increase the production of serotonin, a brain chemical that influences the body’s sleep-wake cycle.
                            • Fiber-rich foods – Eating more fiber could be key for better sleep. Eating fiber was associated with more restorative slow-wave sleep—the more you eat, the better you sleep—per a study published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. Fiber prevents blood sugar surges that may lower melatonin. Get a fiber boost from beans, artichokes, bran cereal and quinoa.
                            • Salmon – Most fish, especially salmon, halibut and tuna boost vitamin B6, which is needed to make melatonin— a sleep-inducing hormone triggered by darkness.

                            3. Adjust your sleep temperature

                            Once you’ve gone through the first 2 recommendations, the last step to experiment with is temperature. According to Sleep.org, the ideal temperature for sleep is 60-67 Farenheit. This may be cooler than what most people are used to, but keep in mind that our body temperature changes once we fall asleep.

                            Rule of thumb: sleeping in cooler temperature is better for sleep quality than warmer temperature.

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                            Find out how to maintain the optimal temperature to sleep better here: How to Sleep Faster with the Best Temperature

                            Sleep better form now on

                            Congrats on making it to the end of this guide on sleep. If you’re serious about taking the necessary steps in improving your sleep, remember to take it one step at a time.

                            I recommend trying just one of the steps mentioned such as taking a hot bath, blocking out blue light at night, or sleeping in cooler temperature. From there, see how it impacts your sleep quality and you can keep doing what works, and throw away what doesn’t.

                            As long as you follow these steps cautiously and diligently, I know you’ll see improved results in your sleep!

                            Featured photo credit: pixabay via pixabay.com

                            Reference

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