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9 Ways to Stop Overeating

9 Ways to Stop Overeating

Overeating is a serious problem for lots of folks. While many attribute overeating to a lack of willpower, it’s more complex than that. Scientists say people who overeat exhibit different brain activity than those who don’t.

Fortunately, there are ways to stop overeating that don’t rely on willpower or rewiring your brain. Let’s explore nine of them.

1. Eat breakfast.

Skipping breakfast is a big no-no. Research shows people who don’t eat breakfast are more prone to overeating later in the day and have a higher incidence of coronary heart disease. Another study showed that eating eggs in the morning can help you eat less throughout the day.

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2. Slow down.

It may sound obvious, but eating slowly and mindfully is one of the best strategies for combating overeating.  Eating slower helps you feel full faster.

3. Use smaller plates.

The larger the plate, the more likely you are to overeat, says food researcher Brian Wansink. Most standard dinner plates are around 12 inches in diameter. Switch to a 9-inch plate and you’ll eat less.

4. Pay attention to your emotions.

You need to become aware of your reasons for wanting to eat junk food to understand why you overeat. For example, maybe you eat compulsively to make yourself feel better or to combat stress. Identify your triggers, and you’ll be more likely to create personalized strategies to deal with them.

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5. Exercise more.

Research shows that your responsiveness to food cues is significantly reduced after exercise. In other words, you’re less likely to want to indulge when you see a picture of a giant ice cream sundae.

Not to mention the fact that exercise is a keystone habit that can change your life.

6. Choose nutrient-dense foods.

“Nutrient density” means the amount of nutrition packed into a particular volume of food. For example, you can eat a giant plate of broccoli to get the same amount of calories in a tiny cup of ice cream because vegetables are generally more nutrient-dense.

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Steer clear of foods like sweets, cheese, and soda, which don’t offer a lot of nutritional bang for your buck. Choose healthy foods like vegetables, fruits, lean meats, healthy oils, and beans instead.

7. Pack healthy snacks for when you’re on the go.

Healthy snacks are an essential tool to help you avoid overeating. Studies show that snacking on healthy foods like almonds can help you avoid food cravings. So pack healthy snacks like nuts, seeds, fruit, and vegetables with hummus and take them with you to work, school, or other places you go throughout the day.

8. Allow for one cheat meal each week.

Cheat meals are when you reward yourself for eating healthy by splurging on something you love. This doesn’t mean have a free-for-all at the buffet. But having one or two pieces of pizza is okay. Completely depriving yourself makes it much more likely you’ll give in to food cravings and overeat.

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9. Plan for setbacks.

Implementation intentions help you plan for bumps in the road. The basic setup for an implementation intention is this:

If this happens, I’ll do that.

For example, if you find yourself getting stressed and reaching for a bag of chips even though you’re not hungry, write down the following implementation intention: “If I get stressed and reach for chips, I will grab a piece of fruit instead” or “If I get stressed and reach for chips, I will go for a walk instead.” This is a powerful strategy that uses proven principles of behavioral psychology. A little planning goes a long way.

Overeating can be a tough thing to overcome, but these methods will help. The more you can work to develop healthier habits, the less likely you’ll be to overeat. Take one step at a time, focus on the small wins, and you’ll crack this bad habit for good.

Featured photo credit: meshmar2 via flickr.com

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Scott Christ

Scott Christ is a writer, entrepreneur, and founder of Pure Food Company.

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Last Updated on February 15, 2019

Why Is Goal Setting Important to a Truly Fulfilling Life?

Why Is Goal Setting Important to a Truly Fulfilling Life?

In Personal Development-speak, we are always talking about goals, outcomes, success, desires and dreams. In other words, all the stuff we want to do, achieve and create in our world.

And while it’s important for us to know what we want to achieve (our goal), it’s also important for us to understand why we want to achieve it; the reason behind the goal or some would say, our real goal.

Why is goal setting important?

1. Your needs and desire will be fulfilled.

Sometimes when we explore our “why”, (why we want to achieve a certain thing) we realize that our “what” (our goal) might not actually deliver us the thing (feeling, emotion, internal state) we’re really seeking.

For example, the person who has a goal to lose weight in the belief that weight loss will bring them happiness, security, fulfillment, attention, popularity and the partner of their dreams. In this instance, their “what” is weight-loss and their “why” is happiness (etc.) and a partner.

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Six months later, they have lost the weight (achieved their goal) but as is often the case, they’re not happier, not more secure, not more confident, not more fulfilled and in keeping with their miserable state, they have failed to attract their dream partner.

After all, who wants to be with someone who’s miserable? They achieved their practical goal but still failed to have their needs met.

So they set a goal to lose another ten pounds. And then another. And maybe just ten more. With the destructive and erroneous belief that if they can get thin enough, they’ll find their own personal nirvana. And we all know how that story ends.

2. You’ll find out what truly motivates you

The important thing in the process of constructing our best life is not necessarily what goals we set (what we think we want) but what motivates us towards those goals (what we really want).

The sooner we begin to explore, identify and understand what motivates us towards certain achievements, acquisitions or outcomes (that is, we begin moving towards greater consciousness and self awareness), the sooner we will make better decisions for our life, set more intelligent (and dare I say, enlightened) goals and experience more fulfilment and less frustration.

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We all know people who have achieved what they set out to, only to end up in the same place or worse (emotionally, psychologically, sociologically) because what they were chasing wasn’t really what they were needing.

What we think we want will rarely provide us with what we actually need.

3. Your state of mind will be a lot healthier

We all set specific goals to achieve/acquire certain things (a job, a car, a partner, a better body, a bank balance, a title, a victory) because at some level, most of us believe (consciously or not) that the achievement of those goals will bring us what we really seek; joy, fulfilment, happiness, safety, peace, recognition, love, acceptance, respect, connection.

Of course, setting practical, material and financial goals is an intelligent thing to do considering the world we live in and how that world works.

But setting goals with an expectation that the achievement of certain things in our external, physical world will automatically create an internal state of peace, contentment, joy and total happiness is an unhealthy and unrealistic mindset to inhabit.

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What you truly want and need

Sometimes we need to look beyond the obvious (superficial) goals to discover and secure what we really want.

Sadly, we live in a collective mindset which teaches that the prettiest and the wealthiest are the most successful.

Some self-help frauds even teach this message. If you’re rich or pretty, you’re happy. If you’re both, you’re very happy. Pretty isn’t what we really want; it’s what we believe pretty will bring us. Same goes with money.

When we cut through the hype, the jargon and the self-help mumbo jumbo, we all have the same basic goals, desires and needs:

Joy, fulfilment, happiness, safety, peace, recognition, love, acceptance, respect, connection.

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Nobody needs a mansion or a sport’s car but we all need love.

Nobody needs massive pecs, six percent body-fat, a face lift or bigger breasts but we all need connection, acceptance and understanding.

Nobody needs to be famous but we all need peace, calm, balance and happiness.

The problem is, we live in a culture which teaches that one equals the other. If only we lived in a culture which taught that real success is far more about what’s happening in our internal environment, than our external one.

It’s a commonly-held belief that we’re all very different and we all have different goals — whether short term or long term goals. But in many ways we’re not, and we don’t; we all want essentially the same things.

Now all you have to do is see past the fraud and deception and find the right path.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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