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25 Best Photos On Flickr In 2014 Which Will Show You The Beauty Of The World

25 Best Photos On Flickr In 2014 Which Will Show You The Beauty Of The World

Although there are millions of photographs on Flickr, the photography giants have somehow managed to collect a list of the 25 most inspiring, exquisite photographs of 2014. Their final list was determined by community engagement—how many times each photo had been viewed and favorited—and it features some really incredible pieces.

1. *** by Elina Shumilova

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    With a portfolio of almost 300 unique and beautiful photographs, Elena Shumilova is without a doubt one of the most talented photographers and Flickr members on the Internet.

    2. Nightly shower 130812 F4332 by Pete Huu

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      This striking photograph was taken near Helsinki, whilst Pete Huu was hunting for Perseids.

      3. Persist | Lofoten, Norway by Lorenzo Montezemolo

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        This bright green streak of aurora lasted for quite a while in Lofted, Norway. According to Lorenzo Montezemolo, he had four hours to take a great photo of the strange green lights.

        4. Wherever You Lay Your Head by Rosie Hardy

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          Accompanied by an inspiring Lana Del Rey quote, this photograph by Rosie Hardy was taken last February and has received over 800,000 views.

          5. John. by LJ

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            The identity of John is limited to his name, but according to LJ’s photograph information this was taken in Overtown, Miami.

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            5. Lightbulb by Alexandr Tikki

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              The lightbulb is the comic indicator of bright ideas, but few of those thoughts could become reality without the work of human hands.

              6. Ixspreparation2 by Mark Rademaker

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                This is the Eaglework’s IXS Enterprise First Generation FTL Starship concept, one of Mark Rademaker’s many fantastic works of art and engineering.

                7. Night Reading by Laura Williams

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                  “Sometimes when I can’t sleep I sit on my ceiling and read.” – Laura Williams. Don’t we all!

                  8. Besides my dad, she was the only one in my family who was like this… by Brandon Stanton

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                    Do you remember the saddest moment of your life? When my grandmother died. I was nine. Besides my dad, she was the only one in my family who was like this. And she was the only other person who could give me any perspective on what it was going to be like, and how to handle it.”

                    9. Loopy sky by SoulRiser

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                      SoulRiser seems a little surprised that his photograph is featuring on these ‘Top of 2014’ lists, but with beautiful shots like this I’m surprised there aren’t more of his on making the cut!

                      10. Bear Lake – Pentax 67 + Portra 400 by Trent Davis

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                        Taken near Bear Lake in Rocky Mountain National Forest, this photograph is one of Trent Davis’ impressive, 1000-strong Flickr collection.

                        11. NAVCAM top 10 at 10 km – 10 by European Space Agency

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                          Although this may look a bit like a ink blot test, it’s actually Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and the shot was taken my the European Space Agency’s Rosetta. “Some light contrast enhancements have been made to emphasise certain features and to bring out features in the shadowed areas” the ESA says, but this is only because in reality the comet is almost pitch black.

                          12. Oil Pastels by Jon Smith

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                            The first step to creating this fantastic photograph was to fill a standard lightbulb with oil paints, the second step was a lot simpler: shooting it with a pellet gun.

                            13. Here, Once Again by Alex Benetel

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                              Despite the worrying amount of leeches that can be found on her Aunt’s property, Alex Benetel was determined to get this photograph. A brave, brave photographer if ever there was one.

                              14. Chinatown by Masashi Wakui

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                                Yokohama Chinatown (35°26’39.2″N 139°38’53.2″E) is a beautiful little part of the world, and thanks to Masashi Wakui we all get to see it.

                                15. Such Is The Price Of Leaving by Whitney Justesen

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                                  Whitney Justesen’s photostream is perhaps one of the most beautiful so far, featuring more photographs from her trip to Alaska it’s certainly worth seeing.

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                                  16. I Will Learn To Love The Skies I’m Under. by David Uzochukwu

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                                    This photograph was taken alongside 23 others by different photographers. Each of these talented artists was asked to interpret one line of Mumford & Sons’ Hopeless Wanderer. David Uzochukwu did a fantastic job with the equally beautiful lyrics “I will learn to love the skies I’m under”.

                                    17. On The Neighbour’s Grounds by Rosie Anne Prosser

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                                      After fog and mist rolled onto the lands that Rosie Anne Prosser new so well, she found herself wandering like a stranger.

                                      18. The Dreamy Coast by Rob Macklin

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                                        Rob Maclin often drives for miles to get a good photograph, and when clouds finally rolled into the California skies back in January he was quick to travel with his son to the coast and await this majestic sunset.

                                        19. Bagel & Lox by Davide Luciano

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                                          Davide Luciano’s gourmet mouse trap: delicious but deadly!

                                          20. Little Sherlock by Adrian Sommeling

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                                            Using clever lighting and Adobe Photoshop, Adrian Sommeling has creating a mind-blowing portfolio filled with these unique, surreal photographs.

                                            21. Pyramid Barn by Steve Arnold

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                                              Named Pyramid Barn because in some spots it looked like a miniature pyramid, Steve Arnolds says this illustrious farmland reminded him of many trips the UK’s Glastonbury Festival.

                                              22. HIPA by Ian Webb

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                                                HIPA is a non-profit photography show that will take place in England later this year. Ian Webb aims to raise HIPA’s profile so everyone can join in.

                                                23. Fim de tarde by Johnson Barros

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                                                  Choosing to be a pilot is choosing to live a hectic, stressful life: but I bet few among them would change their paths.

                                                  24. 320/365 by Alex Currie

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                                                    As far as selfies go, Alex Curie has to be the master of them right?

                                                    25. Red Anemone by Jacob Edmiston

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                                                      Jacob Edmiston’s photography portfolio includes some of the most detailed, exquisite of flowers that can be viewed by human eyes, there’s no wonder at all his inspired work was included in the Top 2014 lists.

                                                      Featured photo credit: Box Brownie | Little Visuals via littlevisuals.co

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                                                      Siobhan Harmer

                                                      Siobhan is a passionate writer sharing about motivation and happiness tips on Lifehack.

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                                                      Last Updated on November 12, 2020

                                                      Why You’re Feeling Tired All the Time (and What to Do About It)

                                                      Why You’re Feeling Tired All the Time (and What to Do About It)

                                                      If you find that you’re feeling tired all the time, it’s important to understand that it’s a common problem for many. With all of the demands of daily life, being tired seems to be the new baseline. In fact, two-fifths of Americans are tired most of the week.[1]

                                                      If you’re tired of feeling exhausted, then I’ve got some great news for you. New research is helping us gain critical insights into the underlying causes of feeling tired all the time.

                                                      In this article, we’ll discuss the latest reasons why you’re so tired and practical steps you can take to finally get to the bottom of your fatigue and feel rested.

                                                      What Happens When You’re Too Tired

                                                      If you sleep just two hours less than the normal eight hours, you could be as impaired as someone who has consumed up to three beers.[2] And you’ve probably experienced the impact yourself.

                                                      Here are some common examples of what happens when you’re feeling tired:[3]

                                                      • Trouble focusing because memory and learning functions may be impaired.
                                                      • Experience mood swings and an inability to differentiate between what’s important and what’s not.
                                                      • Dark circles under your eyes and/or your skin make look dull and lackluster in the short term and over time your skin may get wrinkles and show signs of aging because your body didn’t have time to remove toxins during sleep.
                                                      • Finding it more difficult to exercise.
                                                      • Immune system may weaken, causing you to pick up infections more easily.
                                                      • Overeating because not getting enough sleep activates the body’s endocannabinoids, even when you’re not hungry.
                                                      • Metabolism slows down, so what you eat is more likely to be stored as belly fat.

                                                      Why Are You Feeling Tired All the Time?

                                                      Leading experts are starting to recognize that there are three primary reasons people feel tired on a regular basis: sleep deprivation, fatigue, and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS).

                                                      Here’s a quick overview of each common cause of fatigue and feeling tired all of the time:

                                                      1. Tiredness occurs from sleep deprivation when you don’t get high-quality sleep consistently. It typically can be solved by changing your routine and getting enough deep, restorative sleep.
                                                      2. Fatigue occurs from prolonged sleeplessness, which could be triggered by numerous health problems, such as mental health issues, long-term illness, fibromyalgia, obesity, sleep apnea, or stress. It typically can be improved by changing your lifestyle and using sleep aids or treatments, if recommended by your physician.
                                                      3. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a medical condition also known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis that occurs from persistent exhaustion that doesn’t go away with sleep.

                                                      The exact cause of CFS is not known, but it may be due to problems with the immune system, a bacterial infection, a hormone imbalance, or emotional trauma. It typically involves working with a doctor to rule out other illnesses before diagnosing and treating CFS.[4]

                                                      Always consult a physician to get a personal diagnosis about why you are feeling tired, especially if it is a severe condition.

                                                      You can learn more about some causes of fatigue in this video:

                                                      Feeling Tired Vs Being Fatigued

                                                      If lack of quality sleep doesn’t seem to be the root cause for you, then it’s time to explore fatigue as the reason you are frequently feeling tired.

                                                      Until recently, tiredness and fatigue were thought to be interchangeable. Leading experts now realize that tiredness and fatigue are different.

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                                                      Tiredness is primarily about lack of sleep. However, fatigue is a perceived feeling of being tired that is much more likely to occur in people who have depression, anxiety, or emotional stress and/or are overweight and physically inactive[5].

                                                      Symptoms of fatigue include:

                                                      • Difficulty concentrating
                                                      • Low stamina
                                                      • Difficulty sleeping
                                                      • Anxiety
                                                      • Low motivation

                                                      These symptoms may sound similar to those of tiredness, but they usually last longer and are more intense.

                                                      Unfortunately, there is no definitive reason why fatigue occurs because it can be a symptom of an emotional or physical illness. However, there are still a number of steps you can take to reduce difficult symptoms by making a few simple lifestyle changes.

                                                      How Much Sleep Is Enough?

                                                      The number one reason you may feel tired is because of sleep deprivation, which means you are not getting enough high-quality sleep.

                                                      Research suggests that most adults need 7 to 9 hours of high-quality, uninterrupted sleep per night[6]. If you’re sleep deprived, the amount of sleep you need increases.

                                                      Get the right amount of sleep to stop feeling tired.

                                                        The key to quality sleep is being able to get long, uninterrupted sleep cycles throughout the night. It typically takes 90 minutes for you to reach a state of deep REM sleep where your body’s healing crew goes to work.

                                                        Ideally, you want to get at least 3 to 4 deep REM sleep cycles in per night. That’s why it’s so important to stay asleep for 7 or more hours.

                                                        Research also shows that people who think they can get by on less sleep don’t perform as well as people who get at least seven hours of sleep a night[7]

                                                        If you are not getting 7 hours of high-quality sleep regularly, then sleep deprivation is the most likely reason you feel tired all the time. That is actually good news because sleep deprivation is much simpler and easier to address than the other root causes.

                                                        It’s also a good idea to rule out sleep deprivation as the reason why you are tired before moving on to the other possibilities, such as fatigue or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, which may require a doctor for diagnosis and treatment.

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                                                        4 Simple Changes to Reduce Fatigue

                                                        Personally, I’m a big believer in upgrading your lifestyle to uplift your life. I overcame chronic stress and exhaustion by making these four changes to my lifestyle:

                                                        1. Eating healthy, home-cooked meals versus microwaving processed foods or eating out
                                                        2. Exercising regularly
                                                        3. Using stressbusters
                                                        4. Creating a bedtime routine to sleep better

                                                        After I made the 4 simple changes in my lifestyle, I no longer felt exhausted all of the time.

                                                        I was so excited that I wanted to help others replace stress and exhaustion with rest and well-being, too. That’s why I became a Certified Holistic Wellness Coach through the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute.

                                                        Interestingly enough, I discovered that Dr. Sears recommends a somewhat similar L.E.A.N. lifestyle:

                                                        • L is for Lifestyle and means living healthy, including getting enough sleep.
                                                        • E is for Exercise and means getting at least 20 minutes of physical activity a day, ideally for six days a week.
                                                        • A is for Attitude and means thinking positive and reducing stress whenever possible.
                                                        • N is for Nutrition and means emphasizing a right-fat diet, not a low-fat diet.

                                                        The L.E.A.N. lifestyle is a scientifically-proven way to reduce fatigue, get to the optimal weight, and to achieve overall wellness.[8]

                                                        Living Healthy

                                                        Getting enough high-quality sleep every day is the surefire way to help you feel less fatigued, more rested, and better overall.

                                                        In fact, if you aren’t getting enough sleep, your body isn’t getting the time it needs to repair itself; meaning that if you are suffering from an illness, it’s far more likely to linger. In fact, long-term sleep deprivation has been linked to an increase in Alzheimer’s later in life[9].

                                                        As unlikely as it sounds, though, fatigue can sometimes make it difficult to sleep. That’s why I’d recommend taking a look at your bedtime routine before you go to bed and optimize it based on sleep best practices.

                                                        Here are 3 quick and easy tips for creating a pro-sleep bedtime routine:

                                                        1. Unplug

                                                        Many of us try to unwind by watching TV or doing something on an iPhone or tablet. However, tech can affect your melatonin production due to the blue light that they emit, fooling your body into thinking it’s still daytime. This won’t help you stop feeling tired all the time.

                                                        Try to turn off all tech one hour before bed and create a tech-free zone in your bedroom.

                                                        2. Unwind

                                                        Use the time before bed to do something you find relaxing such as reading a book, listening to soothing music, meditating, or taking an Epsom salt bath.

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                                                        3. Get Comfortable

                                                        Ensure your bed is comfortable and your room is set up for sleep.

                                                        Make sure you room is cool. 60-68 degrees is the ideal temperature for most people to sleep. Also, it’s ideal if your bedroom is dark and there is no noise.

                                                        Finally, make sure everything is handled (e.g., laying out tomorrow’s clothes) before you get into your nice, comfy bed. If your mind is still active, write a to-do list to help you fall asleep faster.[10]

                                                        This article also offers practical tips to build a bedtime routine: How to Build a Good Bedtime Routine That Makes Your Morning Easier

                                                        Exercise

                                                        Many people know that exercise is good for them, but they just can’t figure out how to fit it into their busy schedules.

                                                        That’s what happened in my case, but when my chronic stress and exhaustion turned into systemic inflammation (which can lead to major diseases like Alzheimer’s), I realized it was time to change my sedentary lifestyle.

                                                        I decided to start swimming because it was something I had always loved to do. Find an exercise you love and stick to it to stop feeling tired all the time. Ideally, get a combination of endurance training, strength training, and flexibility training during your daily 20-minute workout.

                                                        If you haven’t exercised in a while and have a lot of stress in your life, you may want to give yoga a try as it will increase your flexibility and lower your stress.

                                                        Attitude

                                                        Stress may be a major reason why you aren’t feeling well all of the time. At least that was the case with me.

                                                        When I worked 70 hours per week as a High-Tech Executive, I felt chronically stressed and exhausted, but there was one thing that always worked to help me feel calmer and less fatigued: Breathing.

                                                        But not just any old breathing. It was a special form of deep Yogic breathing called the “Long-Exhale Breathing” or “4-7-8 breathing” (or “Pranayama” in Sanskrit).

                                                        Here’s how you do Long-Exhale Breathing:

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                                                        1. Sit in a comfortable position with your spine straight and your hand on your tummy.
                                                        2. Breathe in deeply and slowly from your diaphragm with your mouth closed while you count to 4 (ideally until your stomach feels full of air).
                                                        3. Hold your breath while you mentally count to 7 and enjoy the stillness.
                                                        4. Breathe out through your mouth with a “ha” sound while you count to 8 (or until your stomach has no more air in it).
                                                        5. Pause after you finish your exhale while you notice the sense of wholeness and relaxation from completing one conscious, deep breath.
                                                        6. Repeat 3 times, ensuring your exhale is longer than your inhale so you relax your nervous system.

                                                        This type of “long-exhale breathing” is scientifically proven to reduce stress.

                                                        When your exhale is twice as long as your inhale, it soothes your parasympathetic nervous system, which regulates the relaxation response.[11]

                                                        Nutrition

                                                        Diet is vital for beating fatigue if you’re feeling tired all the time – after all, food is your main source of energy.

                                                        If your diet is poor, then it implies you’re not getting the nutrients you need to sustain healthy energy levels, which may lead to daytime sleepiness.

                                                        Eating a diet for fatigue doesn’t need to be complicated or time-consuming though. For most people, it’s just a case of swapping a few unhealthy foods for a few healthier ones, like switching from low-fiber, processed foods to whole, high-fiber foods.

                                                        Here’re 9 simple diet swaps you can make today:

                                                        1. Replace your morning coffee with Matcha green tea and drink only herbal tea within six hours of bedtime.
                                                        2. Add a healthy fat or protein to any carb you eat, especially if you eat before bed.
                                                        3. Fill up with fiber, especially green leafy vegetables.
                                                        4. Replace refined, processed, low-fiber pastas and grains with zucchini noodles and whole grains such as buckwheat, quinoa, sorghum, oats, amaranth, millet, teff, brown rice, and corn.
                                                        5. Swap natural sweeteners for refined sugars, and try to ensure you don’t get more than 25g of sugar a day if you are a woman and 30g of sugar a day if you are a man.
                                                        6. Replace ice cream with low-sugar alternatives.
                                                        7. Swap omega-6, partially-hydrogenated oils such as corn, palm, sunflower, safflower, cotton, canola and soybean oil for omega-3 oils such as flax, olive, and nut oils.
                                                        8. Replace high-sugar yoghurts with low-sugar, dairy-free yoghurts.
                                                        9. Swap your sugar-laden soda for sparkling water with a splash of low-sugar juice.

                                                        Also, ensure your diet is giving you enough of the daily essential vitamins and minerals. Most of us don’t get enough Vitamin D, Vitamin B-12, Calcium, Iron, and Magnesium. If you are low on any of the above vitamins and minerals, you may experience fatigue and low energy.

                                                        That’s why it’s always worth having your doctor check your levels. If you find any of them are low, then try to eat foods rich in them.

                                                        Alternatively, you might consider a high-quality multivitamin or specific supplement.

                                                        The Bottom Line

                                                        If you are tired of feeling tired all the time, then there is tremendous hope.

                                                        If you are tired because you are not getting enough high-quality sleep, then the best remedy is a bedtime routine based on sleep best practices. If you are tired because you have stress and fatigue, then the best remedy are four simple lifestyle changes discussed above.

                                                        Overall, adopting a healthier lifestyle is the ideal remedy for feeling more rested and energized.

                                                        More Tips to Stop Feeling Tired All the Time

                                                        Featured photo credit: Cris Saur via unsplash.com

                                                        Reference

                                                        [1] YouGov: Two-fifths of Americans are tired most of the week
                                                        [2] National Safety Council: Is Your Company Confronting Workplace Fatigue?
                                                        [3] The New York Times: Why Are We So Freaking Tired?
                                                        [4] Mayo Clinic: Chronic fatigue syndrome
                                                        [5] Very Well Health: Differences Between Sleepiness and Fatigue
                                                        [6] Advanced Sleep Medicine Services: NEW Guidelines: How much sleep do you need?
                                                        [7] Mayo Clinic: Lack of sleep: Can it make you sick?
                                                        [8] Ask Dr. Sears: The L.E.A.N. Lifestyle
                                                        [9] National Institute on Aging: Sleep loss encourages spread of toxic Alzheimer’s protein
                                                        [10] American Psychological Association: Getting a Good Night’s Sleep
                                                        [11] Yoga International: Learning to Exhale: 2-to-1 Breathing

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