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11 Dieting Mistakes You Don’t Know You’re Making

11 Dieting Mistakes You Don’t Know You’re Making

We all know of dieting as a tedious process. The process of actually motivating yourself and finally convincing yourself that this is finally it, you’re going to start. That is in fact the simple part. The hard part is, of course, getting it right and creating the perfect formula for your dieting efforts. Unfortunately, it is that same formula you are following for your diet that might be sabotaging your results. Dieting is a sea filled with many dos and don’ts but we’ll reveal how the ideas you think might be helping you, are in fact, hurting you.

1. Starting a Diet

Dieting can be a great start to a healthier body, but there are also repercussions with diets that many are unaware of. The one problem you can face with dieting is the aftereffect it brings with binge eating.

The problem with dieting is that you restrict yourself of vital nutrients, micro-nutrients, and healthy fats – this void then creates an imbalance in your body’s chemical processes and hormonal balance, which in turn will lead to post-dieting binge eating. You’ll soon find unhealthy food cravings after coming out of a diet regimen.

2. Reducing Your Calorie Intake is a No-no

Lowering your metabolic weight means your dependency on food becomes lower. This drop will cause a spike in weight, specifically when you return to your normal food intake. You’ll find that once you’re back to your regular eating habits, packing up those pounds will come even faster than before. By reducing calories, your body, to compensate, will start storing away fat, a key for reserving its energy.

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3. Spending Too Much Time on the Scale

The infamous daily scale step in hopes of miraculously shedding a few pounds consumes you. Carefully gauging where the needle sits time and time again can be stressful and misleading. Here’s the thing — muscle has a much greater density, therefore it takes up less volume than an equal mass of fat and this is deceiving. You might be losing your fat from your dieting efforts, but if you are also weight training or exercising, then you might in fact hover around the same weight, maybe even increase in pounds. Not to worry, though because muscle weighs more than fat so this weight might be deceiving to the eyes.

4. Relying on Diet Pills

Usually regarded as the shortcut in dieting, diet pills are known to create dependency and in some cases extreme addiction. You may think that this seems unlikely, but the truth is that diet pills can create ongoing psychological and physiological problems. Some of the more common side effects that come with diet pills are: include insomnia, restlessness, headaches, diarrhea, and dry mouth. Due to their chemical make-up, there is a chance that intestinal problems, diarrhea and cramps can also occur after taking pills, which promise to block carbs or fat. These bad effects perpetuate a dependent cycle. Let alone that over the counter diet pills are unregulated.

5. Not Incorporating Fat into Your Diet

By now you we all know fat is known as a three-letter enemy towards dieting or better known as the “F” word. Unfortunately it has the worst credibility as a compound. But new data has emerged on its great benefits, well, the good fat that is. Fat is a great contributor to making our skin soft, providing essential fatty acids, acting as a energizing fuel source, and mainly acts as a source to help you absorb vitamins A, D, E and K, which are essential for your nervous system. What you should look for are Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Fats. These types of fats raise good HDL cholesterol, lower bad LDL cholesterol and protect against the buildup of plaque in your arteries.

In addition to providing essential omega-3 fatty acids — which boost brain function and may help strengthen your immune system and improve your mood — and omega-6 fatty acids, which in small amounts can keep skin and eyes healthy. At 9 calories per gram, any type of fat — good or bad — packs more than twice the calories of carbohydrate and protein. But the key here is moderation.

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6. Thinking Whole Wheat is a Healthier Choice

Here’s one that does not get talked about often… whole wheat. The bark against whole wheat is the misconception of it being favorably healthy. We all know that refined grains like white bread is digested fairly quick, due to this quick digestion, it basically causes a spike in blood sugar. Although, whole wheat is considered as a healthy alternative with its high fiber content, the problem is that it is usually mixed well in with fine flour, which unfortunately leads to rapid spikes in blood sugar as well.

To measure how quickly food would elevate blood sugar science uses the glycemic index as the gold standard. According to a Harvard study research found that on average, whole wheat bread has a glycemic index of 71, consequently it falls nearly identical to white bread.

7. Lacking in Your Precious Sleep

Sleep is very important and when it involves keep off extra pounds, there’s no exception. When you are catching up on night’s sleep, you affect your body’s production of leptin (a hormone responsible for notifying your body when it is full).

In addition, levels of the hormone Ghrelin are increased when you are sleep deprived. The problem with this is that the increase in Ghrelin secretion can be held responsible for overeating. Therefore getting a night’s rest is imperative, let alone the energy levels you’ll begin to feel when you are all caught up. By tweaking your sleeping habits, you might be a

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Sleep affects levels of the hunger-regulating hormone leptin, which helps your body realize it’s full, and ghrelin, which stimulates appetite. Not getting adequate sleep lowers levels of leptin while raising levels of ghrelin, which can cause overeating when you’re sleep-deprived. A recent study found that women who didn’t sleep enough ate an average of 300 more calories than those who got adequate sleep. And, since exercise helps you sleep, revamping your sleeping habits can be the start of a beneficial cycle.

8. Choosing Salads as a Healthier Alternative.

Most of us go with the option of having a salad for lunch, as it is a healthy alternative. This is all great and if eaten with the right ingredients could be greatly beneficial, but the issue lies in what bad choices we make in the decision making of a salad.

For example, adding dressing to your salad using consist of two tablespoons, which could easily exceed 200 calories. There are also disadvantages in adding dried fruits, which conceal sugars.

9. Eating Too Much of the Good Stuff.

It is possible to overdo and overeat on the good stuff. Just because something is healthy does not mean that you can eat excessive amounts of it. For example, nuts contain beneficial good fats, which are heart healthy; the problem with consuming too much is that these fats will creep up on you. Fat contains 9 calories per gram, versus carbohydrates and protein, which are only 4 calories per gram.

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The key is balance and moderation. Spreading your selections of foods with the color spectrum is a great approach. Avoiding portion size will factor in weight gain so no matter how you look at it, if you consume more calories than you burn will cause you to store fat.

10. Missing Out on Breakfast.

Let’s go on the record and say that the breakfast we are referring to do not include your typical dishes, which include, bacon, waffles, pancakes, or anything unhealthy for that matter that is usually associate with a typical breakfast – but rather a delicious and delectable nutrient-dense meal. Well then, if that is the case, you are missing out on a lot. Eating earlier in the day will keep you from starving later in the day. Among other things, when you skip breakfast

11. Not All Fruits are Created Equal.

Fruits are a great for dieting, they really are. The food pyramid recommends us having 2-4 servings of fruits per day. Fruits also provide great nourishment, including essential vitamins and minerals. Unfortunately, without carefully understanding fruits, they might be working against you. The reason? Excessive consumption. The cause? Sugar.

Here’s the thing, most fruits are rated low on the glycemic index (which is a good thing), but those that are high, will cause a spike in blood sugar and eventually cause hunger hormonal imbalance and insulin resistance. Fruits like apples and oranges have a low glycemic, whereas bananas, watermelons and pineapples are high in the glycemic index.

Slowly but surely you will find the balance for your body and find what actually does work. But informing yourself with facts is a body’s best friend to concrete weight loss.

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Last Updated on September 18, 2020

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

7 Simple Rules to Live by to Get in Shape in Two Weeks

Learning how to get in shape and set goals is important if you’re looking to live a healthier lifestyle and get closer to your goal weight. While this does require changes to your daily routine, you’ll find that you are able to look and feel better in only two weeks.

Over the years, I’ve learned a lot about what it takes to get in shape. Although anyone can cover the basics (eat right and exercise), there are some things that I could only learn through trial and error. Let’s cover some of the most important points for how to get in shape in two weeks.

1. Exercise Daily

It is far easier to make exercise a habit if it is a daily one. If you aren’t exercising at all, I recommend starting by exercising a half hour every day. When you only exercise a couple times per week, it is much easier to turn one day off into three days off, a week off, or a month off.

If you are already used to exercising, switching to three or four times a week to fit your schedule may be preferable, but it is a lot harder to maintain a workout program you don’t do every day.

Be careful to not repeat the same exercise routine each day. If you do an intense ab workout one day, try switching it up to general cardio the next. You can also squeeze in a day of light walking to break up the intensity.

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If you’re a morning person, check out these morning exercises that will start your day off right.

2. Duration Doesn’t Substitute for Intensity

Once you get into the habit of regular exercise, where do you go if you still aren’t reaching your goals? Most people will solve the problem by exercising for longer periods of time, turning forty-minute workouts into two hour stretches. Not only does this drain your time, but it doesn’t work particularly well.

One study shows that “exercising for a whole hour instead of a half does not provide any additional loss in either body weight or fat”[1].

This is great news for both your schedule and your levels of motivation. You’ll likely find it much easier to exercise for 30 minutes a day instead of an hour. In those 30 minutes, do your best to up the intensity to your appropriate edge to get the most out of the time.

3. Acknowledge Your Limits

Many people get frustrated when they plateau in their weight loss or muscle gaining goals as they’re learning how to get in shape. Everyone has an equilibrium and genetic set point where their body wants to remain. This doesn’t mean that you can’t achieve your fitness goals, but don’t be too hard on yourself if you are struggling to lose weight or put on muscle.

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Acknowledging a set point doesn’t mean giving up, but it does mean realizing the obstacles you face.

Expect to hit a plateau in your own fitness results[2]. When you expect a plateau, you can manage around it so you can continue your progress at a more realistic rate. When expectations meet reality, you can avoid dietary crashes.

4. Eat Healthy, Not Just Food That Looks Healthy

Know what you eat. Don’t fuss over minutia like whether you’re getting enough Omega 3’s or tryptophan, but be aware of the big things. Look at the foods you eat regularly and figure out whether they are healthy or not. Don’t get fooled by the deceptively healthy snacks just pretending to be good for you.

The basic nutritional advice includes:

  • Eat unprocessed foods
  • Eat more veggies
  • Use meat as a side dish, not a main course
  • Eat whole grains, not refined grains[3]

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Eat whole grains when you want to learn how to get in shape.

    5. Watch Out for Travel

    Don’t let a four-day holiday interfere with your attempts when you’re learning how to get in shape. I don’t mean that you need to follow your diet and exercise plan without any excursion, but when you are in the first few weeks, still forming habits, be careful that a week long break doesn’t terminate your progress.

    This is also true of schedule changes that leave you suddenly busy or make it difficult to exercise. Have a backup plan so you can be consistent, at least for the first month when you are forming habits.

    If travel is on your schedule and can’t be avoided, make an exercise plan before you go[4], and make sure to pack exercise clothes and an exercise mat as motivation to keep you on track.

    6. Start Slow

    Ever start an exercise plan by running ten miles and then puking your guts out? Maybe you aren’t that extreme, but burnout is common early on when learning how to get in shape. You have a lifetime to be healthy, so don’t try to go from couch potato to athletic superstar in a week.

    If you are starting a running regime, for example, run less than you can to start. Starting strength training? Work with less weight than you could theoretically lift. Increasing intensity and pushing yourself can come later when your body becomes comfortable with regular exercise.

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    7. Be Careful When Choosing a Workout Partner

    Should you have a workout partner? That depends. Workout partners can help you stay motivated and make exercising more fun. But they can also stop you from reaching your goals.

    My suggestion would be to have a workout partner, but when you start to plateau (either in physical ability, weight loss/gain, or overall health) and you haven’t reached your goals, consider mixing things up a bit.

    If you plateau, you may need to make changes to continue improving. In this case it’s important to talk to your workout partner about the changes you want to make, and if they don’t seem motivated to continue, offer a thirty day break where you both try different activities.

    I notice that guys working out together tend to match strength after a brief adjustment phase. Even if both are trying to improve, something seems to stall improvement once they reach a certain point. I found that I was able to lift as much as 30-50% more after taking a short break from my regular workout partner.

    Final Thoughts

    Learning how to get in shape in as little as two weeks sounds daunting, but if you’re motivated and have the time and energy to devote to it, it’s certainly possible.

    Find an exercise routine that works for you, eat healthy, drink lots of water, and watch as the transformation begins.

    More Tips on Getting in Shape

    Featured photo credit: Alexander Redl via unsplash.com

    Reference

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