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10 Ways To Gain Indigenous Knowledge

10 Ways To Gain Indigenous Knowledge

Have you ever wondered how to learn from native peoples? How to access opportunities to study ancient healing methods, secrets about life and spiritual growth? Indigenous people hold wisdom that has been passed down for thousands of years. This wisdom has been largely forgotten in Western culture, and includes how to use the body’s own being and energy to become whole, healthy and spiritually aware. Those secrets are still out there, ready to be learned by those who are sincere and make the effort. Having backpacked into remote areas to learn such knowledge, John shares 10 tips for how to access that learning yourself.

1. Put down the book.

Indigenous peoples, in many cases, transmit their wisdom from generation to generation in the form of oral tradition. Even when knowledge is written down, oral tradition contextualizes what is written. If you want to know what they know, you’re going to have to travel to the source and learn in person.

2. Be sincere.

Native peoples can sniff out when Westerners visit them as tourists, as scientists, as ‘drive-by’ spiritual seekers, as journalists, etc. If you’re wanting to learn their tradition in any true sense, you must be sincere and have the right intention to use the knowledge the way it was intended. The sincerity of your heart will open doors to real teachings, since in many cultures, knowledge is not given to those who are not personally prepared to be proper stewards of it.

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3. Do research.

Although native traditions have elements in common, they also vary significantly from one another. Before considering who you might study with, identify traditions you can easily relate to. For example, don’t visit high-altitude tribes if you don’t function well at high altitude. Don’t visit groups who use psychoactive plants as a main ritual if that’s not your thing. Some groups engage in ascetic, physically-demanding and sometimes scary exercises. Some have a gentler approach.

4. Respect your elders.

In this case, it means anyone whose knowledge you are seeking. Many indigenous societies prize wisdom, and hold their teachers in great esteem. Teachers themselves often use politeness as a gauge of your readiness and sincerity. Do not be too forward. Show patience and restraint. Bring a gift. Defer to whomever the local teachers are in the way you speak and carry yourself. Know that direct eye contact with elders, in some cultures, is a sign of disrespect.

5. Merge with them.

In some places where I studied, I was given information that was not in any textbooks or anthropological articles on the tribe. You can learn a great deal from joining a village for a while and studying as one of them. Real oral traditions may be shared only with those who respect the tribe’s ways by living as they do, and not necessarily with those who are there to only study as an outside observer. You may need to learn their language and culture. And in some cases, you must be prepared to dedicate significant time among the tribe, as some top shamans do not accept students for less than a comprehensive training program that can take years.

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6. Identify the real shamans.

In some areas that have already received interest from the outside, there may be many claiming or pretending to be the village’s healers or teachers. They may try to intercept you as you inquire about medicine men and women in the area. Beware, as these practitioners may not be skilled or worse. Use the sincerity of your heart, and keep asking locals to guide you to the people who are at the top of the food chain as teachers/healers for the community.

7. Find local resources.

Studying indigenous wisdom begins in your local area or home country. Seek out professors, shamans, authors or non-profits who have worked with native people and are already familiar with certain areas. They can often point you in the right direction, and may have contacts you can draw on. Keep in mind, these resources may only get you in the door. From there you’ll have to seek out real teachers on your own.

8. Understand what you offer.

Those of us who are more a part of modernized society are often viewed as important and valuable members of the planetary community by native people. Although they may possess wisdom we have lost and forgotten, and we may need them to re-teach it to us, they need us as well. We offer a bridge to the current state of the world. Realize the value you bring by being willing to learn their tradition, as it gives them an ally within modernized society that, from their perspective, needs healing and change to live in harmony with all things.

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9. Consciousness is common ground.

If you are intrigued by the idea of learning native traditions at the source, but worry you may not have much in common with native people, remember human consciousness is much the same across cultures. Our minds share similar qualities irrespective of language and custom. In fact, you may find the shaman experiences more in common with you than with many people within his/her own tribe.

10. Be careful.

Keep in mind traveling in remote areas is dangerous. There is not the same level of communication to the outside world you may have come to expect. You may be traveling in areas with bad characters and in cultures who view you as an unprotected person in terms of the structure of their society. Affiliate yourself with a respected healer quickly, and keep your eyes out. Black magic is common in many areas where positive healing and spiritual arts are practiced.

Indigenous people have so much to offer those of us who have grown up in modernized society in terms of what it means to be a human being, the nature of life, and how to heal and develop our minds through natural methods. We should take care to learn ancient traditions and be respectful stewards of them in order to ensure such knowledge continues to be passed down. By learning native traditions from the source, person to person, we can help ourselves, others, and the planet heal by promoting unity and harmony between all of creation.

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Featured photo credit: 123RF via 123rf.com

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Last Updated on March 24, 2021

8 Smart Home Gadgets You Need in Your House

8 Smart Home Gadgets You Need in Your House

We’ve all done it. We’ve gone out and bought useless gadgets that we don’t really need, just because they seemed really cool at the time. Then, we are stuck with a bunch of junk, and end up tossing it or trying to sell it on Ebay.

On the other hand, there are some pretty awesome tech inventions that are actually useful. For instance, many of the latest home gadgets do some of your work for you, from adjusting the home thermostat to locking your front door. And, if used as designed, these tools should really help to make your life a lot easier—and that’s not just a claim from some infomercial trying to sell you yet another useless gadget.

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Take a look at some of the most popular “smart gadgets” on the market:

1. Smart Door Locks

A smart lock lets you lock and unlock your doors by using your smartphone, a special key fob, or biometrics. These locks are keyless, and much more difficult for intruders to break into, making your home a lot safer. You can even use a special app to let people into your home if you are not there to greet them.

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2. Smart Kitchen Tools

Wouldn’t you just love to have a pot of coffee waiting for you when you get home from work? What about a “smart pan” that tells you exactly when you need to flip that omelet? From meat thermometers to kitchen scales, you’ll find a variety of “smart” gadgets designed to make culinary geeks salivate.

3. Mini Home Speaker Play:1

If you love big sound, but hate how much space big speakers take up, and if you want a stereo system that is no bigger than your fist, check out the Play:1 mini speaker. All you have to do is plug it in, connect, and then you can stream without worrying about any interruptions or interface. You can even add onto it, and have different music playing in different rooms.

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4. Wi-Fi Security Cameras

These are the latest in home security, and they connect to the Wi-Fi in your home. You can use your mobile devices to monitor what is going on in your home at all times, no matter where you are. Options include motion sensors, two-way audio, and different recording options.

5. Nest Thermostat

This is a thermostat that lives with you. It can sense seasonal changes, temperature changes, etc., and it will adjust itself automatically. You will never have to fiddle with a thermostat dial or keypad again, because this one basically does all of the work for you. It can also help you to save as much as 12% on heating bills, and 15% on cooling bills.

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6. Smart Lighting

Control your home lighting from your remote device. This is great if you are out and want to make sure that there are some lights on. It is designed to be energy efficient, so it will pay for itself over time because you won’t have to spend so much on your monthly energy bills.

7. Google Chromecast Ultra

Whether you love movies, television shows, music, etc., you can stream it all using Google Chromecast Ultra. Stream all of the entertainment you love in up to 4K UHD and HDR, for just $69 monthly.

8. Canary

This home security system will automatically contact emergency services when they are needed. This system offers both video and audio surveillance, so there will be evidence if there are any break-ins on your property. You can also use it to check up on what’s happening at home when you are not there, including to make sure the kids are doing their homework.

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