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10 Exercises You Can Do In Bed Every Morning

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10 Exercises You Can Do In Bed Every Morning

Exercising can be a literal pain in the butt. It’s particularly difficult to get motivated in the morning when you’re reluctant to leave you warm, cozy bed. The good news is that you don’t have to! Here are 10 exercises to do in bed to start your day right.

1. The Half Bridge

To perform this exercise, lie on your back and place your feet on the bed with your knees bent and your legs hip width apart. Lift your tailbone and push up until your upper body makes a straight line from shoulder, to hip, to knee. Try and hold this move for 30 seconds, or as long as you can, keeping your tailbone lifted and your glutes engaged. Lower and then repeat for three reps. Make sure you continue to breathe and engage your abs throughout.

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2. Leg Lifts: Part One

For this move, lay flat on your back with your arms at your sides. Make sure your legs are straight and then lift the right one until both it and your hip form a 90-degree angle. Slowly lower the leg down to the bed. Repeat with alternate leg. Do two sets of 10 reps per leg and be sure to exhale as you lift.

3. Leg Lifts: Part Two

Flip onto your stomach and lift your legs as above. This will work your buttocks, but it can be hard on your spine, so don’t do this if you have any kind of back injury.

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4. Planking

Get into push-up position on your mattress, balancing on your forearms instead of your hands. It’s done this way in order to be safe to do on a softer surface. With your weight on your forearms and toes, align your elbows under your shoulders. Lift your body to make a straight line from your head to your heels. Hold this position for 20 seconds and then rest for 30 seconds. Try doing three reps. For an added challenge, gently step one foot at a time out to the side and back in, alternating each time.

5. Push Ups

We’ve all heard of this exercise, and that’s because it’s highly beneficial for adding strength to your core, arms and mid-section. Start by placing your knees or toes and your hands on the bed, with your arms fully extended and while keeping your back straight. Next, lower your chest to the bed, then return to starting position. Perform as many reps as possible.

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6. Tic Taps

This exercise should directly follow your push ups. From the push up, simply take your right hand and tap in front of your left elbow. After you make contact with your elbow, quickly retract the hand to the original position and perform with the opposite hand. Continue tapping back and forth with each for as long as you can.

7. Table Tops

To perform this exercise, sit on the bed with your legs extended in front of you and your arms resting at your sides. Bend your knees and place your feet flat on the bed. Your hands and feet should be flat on the bed pointing in opposite directions from each other. In a smooth action, press firmly into your hands and feet. Straighten your elbows, and lift your hips up toward the ceiling in order to form a straight line with your torso and thighs, making your body appear like a table. Hold the position and squeeze your glutes. Retract, and repeat.

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8. Bench Presses

You don’t need a bar to do this, simply use some hand weights. If you don’t have any, even soup cans will do the job! If I have to explain that the cans should be sealed then we have much bigger problems than fitness to worry about.

9. Sit Ups and Crunches

So long as you don’t have a water bed, you can do sits ups and crunches easily on your own mattress. For an added challenge, add a bicycle move to your sit ups. To do this, lift as you would do for a normal crunch, then twist your body gently to one side. Whilst doing this, extend the opposite leg to the direction your turning. Repeat this movement whilst alternating between sides.

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10. Stretches

Most importantly of all, be sure to do your stretches when you cool down in order to prevent injury.

Featured photo credit: Bed Exercises via media1.onsugar.com

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Tegan Jones

Tegan is a passionate journalist, writer and editor. She writes about lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

“Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

Food is a universal necessity.

It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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