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How to Get a Half-Decent Cup of Caffeinated Coffee

How to Get a Half-Decent Cup of Caffeinated Coffee

coffee

    The art of coffee making might not seem like the sort of topic you’d expect to see in a publication like this one. But there’s no reason that it shouldn’t be covered: we use caffeine as a productivity and lifestyle tool, using it to wake up in the mornings, keep ourselves going longer than usual when deadlines approach and emergencies arise, and even to enhance the effects of twenty minute naps known as “caffeine naps.”

    Not all coffee is created equal — some methods of delivery will provide more taste and caffeine than others. There are also different tips and tricks you can apply to get more of the caffeine out of the bean and into the cup during the brewing process.

    Note: Don’t even try and convince me that coffee is bad and I should remove it from my lifestyle. Even if you win me over intellectually, I’ve spent way too much money on the habit to change my mind now. ;) And while we’re still using italics, the image is by VisualPanic.

    And if you’d like to know how to defend yourself from the assailants of our faith, check out this article I wrote around about this time last year.

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    Throw Out the Instant

    You shouldn’t be drinking that instant swill. It tastes like garbage. But taste is not the most central focus of this article: caffeine delivery is. On that note, you should still throw out the instant.

    Depend on your morning cup of instant coffee to “get you going”? Here’s the breakdown on caffeine content in a variety of types of coffee thanks to Energy Fiend, in milligrams of caffeine per ounce of beverage:

    • Coffee (brewed): 13.44
    • Coffee (drip): 18.12
    • Coffee (espresso): 51.33
    • Coffee (instant): 7.12

    And for comparison’s sake:

    • Coca-Cola Classic: 2.88
    • Diet Coke: 3.75
    • Dr Pepper: 3.42
    • Mountain Dew: 4.58
    • Red Bull: 9.64

    In short, while instant might yield better results than most soft drinks, it is the worst performer among varying types of coffee at delivering caffeine. You might also notice that energy drinks like Red Bull don’t hold a candle to a decently brewed coffee.

    Buy Cheaper Coffee — Arabica vs Robusta

    So I said “half-decent” cup of coffee in the headline. This particular point has absolutely nothing to do with decency of taste; what I’m about to suggest will actually worsen the taste, and truth be told I wouldn’t actually ever choose to do this myself, as an espresso brewing hobbyist who does it for the taste. But if you drink coffee purely for the caffeine, your choice might be different.

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    There are two types of coffee bean: arabica and robusta. The pros and cons of each can be easily summarized.

    • Arabica tastes much better, but has around 1% caffeine content.
    • Robusta tastes like monkey hairs, but has around 2% caffeine content.

    If you hate coffee no matter what kind it is, go for the robusta so you can get more caffeine while drinking less.

    If you do care about the quality of the beans, you might want to look around for an arabica bean that is grown for its higher-than-average caffeine content such as Black Magic.

    Spend Your Money on the Grinder

    Thinking about dropping a few hundred on an espresso machine and grabbing a $20 grinder to go with it? Think again.

    When it comes to coffee equipment, the grinder is the most important piece of gear, and is also one of those pesky devices where you need to pay fairly respectable amounts of money for something that does the job properly, depending on what that job is. I’m not as familiar with the American market but the absolute minimum spend for a quality grinder that does espresso, French press, filter and percolator is about AU$220 (US$150) at this time.

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    Espresso can’t be made without a fine grind. Cheap grinders cannot grind fine enough. The level of grind and the level of tamp pressure are the two factors that generally affect pour time, which should be between 23 and 30 seconds for a shot of espresso. A cheap grinder and cheap espresso machine will usually get you a 10 second pour, which is far too quick. On the flip side, grind too fine and you will choke your machine and nothing will come out.

    When it comes to budgeting for your gear, Mark Prince of CoffeeGeek.com recommends that a budget of US$300 for espresso machine and grinder should start with a split of $150 designated for the machine and $150 designated for the grinder, and you can slowly back off the portion of funds dedicated to the grinder as your budget goes up.

    But what you care about is the caffeine, right? A coffee brewed from a finer grind yields a higher caffeine content than one made with a coarse grind. While brewed coffee in our list above had a lower caffeine content than drip coffee, French press tastes a whole lot better and if you follow these instructions for French press brewing from the founder of Sweet Maria’s you should be able to get a cup of plunger coffee that packs more of a punch. Of course, I doubt that’s his motive for brewing that way, but it works.

    A note: just because French press, percolator and filter coffee will let you get away with a coarser grind, they still have to be even grinds. That means your average $20 grinder will not do.

    Turkish coffee requires a grind even finer than espresso and should yield a high caffeine content (though I have no evidence), which may explain why the two dedicated Turkish coffee drinkers I know are always yelling at each other.

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    Myth: Darker Roast = More Caffeine

    It’s not true. It’s a myth. The level of roast actually has very little impact on caffeine levels in coffee, so feel free to experiment with different roast levels and find out what tastes best for you without feeling deprived. Intuitively speaking I would’ve thought the opposite — that a heavier roasting process would destroy more of the caffeine than a lighter roast would, but that’s not true either.

    The caffeine content of a bean is influenced by its type and origin, not roast level.

    What to Buy

    So you want to give up drinking instant but don’t know what sort of coffee equipment or brewing method to go for. My recommendations…

    You want cheap and convenient. Get a French press and a decent grinder. Any French press will do (don’t worry whether your model is insulated or not, because after ten minutes your coffee is stale anyway), and you don’t need a grinder that can grind particularly fine but you do need one that grind evenly, so get a burr grinder. Don’t buy one of those “whipper-snipper” pieces of junk.

    You want quality and caffeine. Not to imply that you can’t get a quality brew from a French press — bean brokers and roasters use French press to test beans because espresso ruins many of the subtleties in the flavor — but if you want to pack a lot of caffeine into a quality cup of coffee and maybe pick up a complicated but fascinating art form, I recommend espresso brewing.

    Espresso brewing is fun and involved, and sometimes difficult (regularly difficult at first). The resulting cup of coffee is much more your own creation than regular brewed coffee because of all the variables involved. And in my opinion, it’s the best tasting. In this case, you need a decent espresso machine that you’ve done plenty of research on and a high quality grinder — it’s an option that requires more money and more research into the gear you buy.

    If you want to continue exploring coffee, I suggest a site like CoffeeGeek.com — run by people who know way more about coffee than me.

    More by this author

    Joel Falconer

    Editor, content marketer, product manager and writer with 12+ years of experience in the startup, design and tech digital media industries.

    How to Master the Art of Prioritization The Importance of Scheduling Downtime How to Make Decisions Under Pressure 11 Free Mind Mapping Applications & Web Services How to Use Parkinson’s Law to Your Advantage

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    Last Updated on November 19, 2020

    The Gentle Art of Saying No for a Less Stressful Life

    The Gentle Art of Saying No for a Less Stressful Life

    It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments—you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time. That’s why the art of saying no can be a game changer for productivity.

    Requests for your time are coming in all the time—from family members, friends, children, coworkers, etc. To stay productive, minimize stress, and avoid wasting time, you have to learn the gentle art of saying no—an art that many people have problems with.

    What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger, or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

    However, it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here’s how to stop people pleasing and master the gentle art of saying no.

    1. Value Your Time

    Know your commitments and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it.

    Be honest when you tell them that: “I just can’t right now. My plate is overloaded as it is.” They’ll sympathize as they likely have a lot going on as well, and they’ll respect your openness, honesty, and attention to self-care.

    2. Know Your Priorities

    Even if you do have some extra time (which, for many of us, is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time?

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    For example, if my wife asks me to pick up the kids from school a couple of extra days a week, I’ll likely try to make time for it as my family is my highest priority. However, if a coworker asks for help on some extra projects, I know that will mean less time with my wife and kids, so I will be more likely to say no. 

    However, for others, work is their priority, and helping on extra projects could mean the chance for a promotion or raise. It’s all about knowing your long-term goals and what you’ll need to say yes and no to in order to get there. 

    You can learn more about how to set your priorities here.

    3. Practice Saying No

    Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word[1].

    Sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.

    4. Don’t Apologize

    A common way to start out is “I’m sorry, but…” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important when you learn to say no, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm and unapologetic about guarding your time.

    When you say no, realize that you have nothing to feel bad about. You have every right to ensure you have time for the things that are important to you. 

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    5. Stop Being Nice

    Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. However, if you erect a wall or set boundaries, they will look for easier targets.

    Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.

    6. Say No to Your Boss

    Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss—they’re our boss, right? And if we start saying no, then we look like we can’t handle the work—at least, that’s the common reasoning[2].

    In fact, it’s the opposite—explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.

    7. Pre-Empting

    It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting,

    “Look, everyone, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects, and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”

    This, of course, takes a great deal of awareness that you’ll likely only have after having worked in one place or been friends with someone for a while. However, once you get the hang of it, it can be incredibly useful.

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    8. Get Back to You

    Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, try saying no this way:

    “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.”

    At least you gave it some consideration.

    9. Maybe Later

    If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say,

    “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].”

    Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands. If you need to continue saying no, here are some other ways to do so[3]:

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    Saying no the healthy way

      10. It’s Not You, It’s Me

      This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often, the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time.

      Simply say so—you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization—but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true, as people can sense insincerity.

      The Bottom Line

      Saying no isn’t an easy thing to do, but once you master it, you’ll find that you’re less stressed and more focused on the things that really matter to you. There’s no need to feel guilty about organizing your personal life and mental health in a way that feels good to you.

      Remember that when you learn to say no, isn’t about being mean. It’s about taking care of your time, energy, and sanity. Once you learn how to say no in a good way, people will respect your willingness to practice self-care and prioritization. 

      More Tips for a Less Stressful Life

      Featured photo credit: Kyle Glenn via unsplash.com

      Reference

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