Advertising
Advertising

10 Job Listing Sites With Unique Opportunities

10 Job Listing Sites With Unique Opportunities

classifieds

    Even if you’re gainfully employed right now, you’re probably keeping an eye on job listings in your field and news about your industry. It’s just good sense these days: while my grandparents might have been able to build their entire careers with just one employer, climbing the ladder these days often involves moving between companies at least a few times. That means you need resources. You need to be looking at the right job listings, reading relevant industry news and keeping your career-building skills honed.

    Advertising

    The right job listings can be hard to find. There are thousands of sites offering job listings online, from Craigslist to Monster, but most of them wind up listing very similar (if not identical) opportunities. The sites listed here are a little more out of the way — but still worth spending some time on.

    Advertising

    1. LinkedIn
      LinkedIn isn’t an old-fashioned job board, even though it provides a way to search job listings posted by members. Instead, LinkedIn’s value lies in how easy it is to connect with other people working in your industry as well as professionals in general. Many job openings aren’t listed: recruiters would much rather build a network where they can search for the right hire. LinkedIn serves that purpose — but recruiters won’t find you if you aren’t on the site.
    2. USAJobs
      The entire U.S. federal government directs all of its job postings to USAJobs, many of which never make it to other job listing sites. While some of us may not have thought of working for ‘the man’ as an option, the U.S. government is usually hiring for tens of thousands of jobs at a time — in just about every career field. Writers, engineers, accountants: if it’s a job, the federal government is probably hiring.
    3. LinkUp
      Many employers skip placing job listings on external boards, keeping their job opportunities a little closer to home. LinkUp uses automatic tools to find jobs listed only on company websites, compiling listings for its users. There aren’t any duplicates — or scams — as you can often find on sites that accept listings from anybody.
    4. Idealist
      More and more job hunters are placing an emphasis on finding a job that offers some opportunity to give back. Idealist lists jobs from non-profits and idealist organizations. While the site does include volunteer work, it also includes paid positions as well as internships and consulting opportunities.
    5. RealMatch
      A good job interview isn’t that different from a blind date, and RealMatch takes that fact into account. It relies on a set of tests to match you with job opportunities that you’ve displayed a certain level of compatibility with — as well as sending your information to employers looking for someone who meets your profile.
    6. JobSerf
      While most job sites these days are free, JobSerf charges $98 per week. For that fee, you get 20 hours of personalized job searching: one of JobSerf’s professionals searches for jobs that meet your criteria and apply to those positions that meet your needs. The price may seem a little steep if you’re only casually looking, but it could be a better fit if you’re seriously job hunting.
    7. SimplyHired
      Rather than searching thousands of websites and sorting through job listings that ambitious recruiters have posted all over, I’d suggest checking out SimplyHired. It searches a long list of job listing sites, as well as specific companies’ hiring pages, providing you with a fairly complete picture of your options with just one search.
    8. SoloGig
      Just looking for something short-term? SoloGig provides listings of consulting, temporary, contract and freelance opportunities in a broad list of categories. It might not get you a long-term job, but the right project can often help you take your resume up a notch. Furthermore, some of the short-term projects listed on SoloGig are expected to last a year or more.
    9. Women for Hire
      While the jobs available through Women for Hire are available to men as well as women, the site provides a special level of support for women who are hunting for jobs. It offers up specialized advice on issues like finding positions that offer help with child care. Women for Hire goes far beyond the traditional job boards to offer specialized help for women looking for new jobs.
    10. Job-Hunt
      When you search for a job online, you’ll often get a good picture of the jobs that are available on a national — or even international level. Just because those jobs are available doesn’t mean that you’re ready to pick up and move for them, though. Job-Hunt has a long list of links to job hunting resources by state, giving you a head start on local job leads.

    There are a couple of other sites worth keeping an eye on these days: Most state governments have centralized job listings like USAJobs. It might be worth signing up for the RSS feed or email alert on your state’s site. The same is true of your alumni career office. Most schools offer alumni career support indefinitely, and solicit job listings from other alumni. And don’t forget your local want ads — most newspapers make their classified ads available online. Many employers still list their job openings exclusively with their local newspaper, so it’s worth looking locally.

    Advertising

    No matter which sites fit what you might be looking for, just about all of them (with the exception of JobSerf) allow you to either receive new job leads through RSS or email. Even if you’re only looking passively for any opportunities that might cross your computer screen, keeping an eye on these websites can help you get word of perfect fits that may not hit the standard job boards.

    Advertising

    More by this author

    5 Key Characteristics of a Successful Entrepreneur 5 Sites Where You Can Sell Your Photos 7 Tools to Find Someone Online 19 Entrepreneurship Websites Worth Checking Out 50 Businesses You Can Start In Your Spare Time

    Trending in Featured

    1 Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny 2 How to Become an Expert (And Spot out One Nearby) 3 How to Find Your Passion and Live a Fulfilling Life 4 How to Stay Motivated and Reach Your Goals 5 5 Key Characteristics of a Successful Entrepreneur

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on September 17, 2018

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

    Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

    Why do I have bad luck?

    Let me let you into a secret:

    Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky.

    1. Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside your self.

    Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

    Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

    Advertising

    Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

    This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

    They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

    Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

    Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

    What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can.

    Advertising

    No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

    When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

    Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

    2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

    If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

    In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

    Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

    Advertising

    They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

    Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

    To improve your fortune, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to you; then try focusing on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

    Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

    Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

    “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

    Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

    “Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

    Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

    Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

    Read Next