Advertising
Advertising

10 Job Listing Sites With Unique Opportunities

10 Job Listing Sites With Unique Opportunities

classifieds

    Even if you’re gainfully employed right now, you’re probably keeping an eye on job listings in your field and news about your industry. It’s just good sense these days: while my grandparents might have been able to build their entire careers with just one employer, climbing the ladder these days often involves moving between companies at least a few times. That means you need resources. You need to be looking at the right job listings, reading relevant industry news and keeping your career-building skills honed.

    Advertising

    The right job listings can be hard to find. There are thousands of sites offering job listings online, from Craigslist to Monster, but most of them wind up listing very similar (if not identical) opportunities. The sites listed here are a little more out of the way — but still worth spending some time on.

    Advertising

    1. LinkedIn
      LinkedIn isn’t an old-fashioned job board, even though it provides a way to search job listings posted by members. Instead, LinkedIn’s value lies in how easy it is to connect with other people working in your industry as well as professionals in general. Many job openings aren’t listed: recruiters would much rather build a network where they can search for the right hire. LinkedIn serves that purpose — but recruiters won’t find you if you aren’t on the site.
    2. USAJobs
      The entire U.S. federal government directs all of its job postings to USAJobs, many of which never make it to other job listing sites. While some of us may not have thought of working for ‘the man’ as an option, the U.S. government is usually hiring for tens of thousands of jobs at a time — in just about every career field. Writers, engineers, accountants: if it’s a job, the federal government is probably hiring.
    3. LinkUp
      Many employers skip placing job listings on external boards, keeping their job opportunities a little closer to home. LinkUp uses automatic tools to find jobs listed only on company websites, compiling listings for its users. There aren’t any duplicates — or scams — as you can often find on sites that accept listings from anybody.
    4. Idealist
      More and more job hunters are placing an emphasis on finding a job that offers some opportunity to give back. Idealist lists jobs from non-profits and idealist organizations. While the site does include volunteer work, it also includes paid positions as well as internships and consulting opportunities.
    5. RealMatch
      A good job interview isn’t that different from a blind date, and RealMatch takes that fact into account. It relies on a set of tests to match you with job opportunities that you’ve displayed a certain level of compatibility with — as well as sending your information to employers looking for someone who meets your profile.
    6. JobSerf
      While most job sites these days are free, JobSerf charges $98 per week. For that fee, you get 20 hours of personalized job searching: one of JobSerf’s professionals searches for jobs that meet your criteria and apply to those positions that meet your needs. The price may seem a little steep if you’re only casually looking, but it could be a better fit if you’re seriously job hunting.
    7. SimplyHired
      Rather than searching thousands of websites and sorting through job listings that ambitious recruiters have posted all over, I’d suggest checking out SimplyHired. It searches a long list of job listing sites, as well as specific companies’ hiring pages, providing you with a fairly complete picture of your options with just one search.
    8. SoloGig
      Just looking for something short-term? SoloGig provides listings of consulting, temporary, contract and freelance opportunities in a broad list of categories. It might not get you a long-term job, but the right project can often help you take your resume up a notch. Furthermore, some of the short-term projects listed on SoloGig are expected to last a year or more.
    9. Women for Hire
      While the jobs available through Women for Hire are available to men as well as women, the site provides a special level of support for women who are hunting for jobs. It offers up specialized advice on issues like finding positions that offer help with child care. Women for Hire goes far beyond the traditional job boards to offer specialized help for women looking for new jobs.
    10. Job-Hunt
      When you search for a job online, you’ll often get a good picture of the jobs that are available on a national — or even international level. Just because those jobs are available doesn’t mean that you’re ready to pick up and move for them, though. Job-Hunt has a long list of links to job hunting resources by state, giving you a head start on local job leads.

    There are a couple of other sites worth keeping an eye on these days: Most state governments have centralized job listings like USAJobs. It might be worth signing up for the RSS feed or email alert on your state’s site. The same is true of your alumni career office. Most schools offer alumni career support indefinitely, and solicit job listings from other alumni. And don’t forget your local want ads — most newspapers make their classified ads available online. Many employers still list their job openings exclusively with their local newspaper, so it’s worth looking locally.

    Advertising

    No matter which sites fit what you might be looking for, just about all of them (with the exception of JobSerf) allow you to either receive new job leads through RSS or email. Even if you’re only looking passively for any opportunities that might cross your computer screen, keeping an eye on these websites can help you get word of perfect fits that may not hit the standard job boards.

    Advertising

    More by this author

    5 Sites Where You Can Sell Your Photos 7 Tools to Find Someone Online 19 Entrepreneurship Websites Worth Checking Out 50 Businesses You Can Start In Your Spare Time 5 Suggestions for Leaving With Style

    Trending in Featured

    1The Gentle Art of Saying No 26 Proven Ways To Make New Habits Stick 3Simple Productivity: 10 Ways to Do More by Focusing on the Essentials 4Back to Basics: Your Calendar 550 Ways to Increase Productivity and Achieve More in Less Time

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising

    The Gentle Art of Saying No

    The Gentle Art of Saying No

    No!

    It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

    Advertising

    But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

    Advertising

    What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

    Advertising

    But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

    1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
    2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
    3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
    4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
    5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
    6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
    7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
    8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
    9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
    10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

    Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

    Advertising

    Read Next