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10 Job Listing Sites With Unique Opportunities

10 Job Listing Sites With Unique Opportunities

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    Even if you’re gainfully employed right now, you’re probably keeping an eye on job listings in your field and news about your industry. It’s just good sense these days: while my grandparents might have been able to build their entire careers with just one employer, climbing the ladder these days often involves moving between companies at least a few times. That means you need resources. You need to be looking at the right job listings, reading relevant industry news and keeping your career-building skills honed.

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    The right job listings can be hard to find. There are thousands of sites offering job listings online, from Craigslist to Monster, but most of them wind up listing very similar (if not identical) opportunities. The sites listed here are a little more out of the way — but still worth spending some time on.

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    1. LinkedIn
      LinkedIn isn’t an old-fashioned job board, even though it provides a way to search job listings posted by members. Instead, LinkedIn’s value lies in how easy it is to connect with other people working in your industry as well as professionals in general. Many job openings aren’t listed: recruiters would much rather build a network where they can search for the right hire. LinkedIn serves that purpose — but recruiters won’t find you if you aren’t on the site.
    2. USAJobs
      The entire U.S. federal government directs all of its job postings to USAJobs, many of which never make it to other job listing sites. While some of us may not have thought of working for ‘the man’ as an option, the U.S. government is usually hiring for tens of thousands of jobs at a time — in just about every career field. Writers, engineers, accountants: if it’s a job, the federal government is probably hiring.
    3. LinkUp
      Many employers skip placing job listings on external boards, keeping their job opportunities a little closer to home. LinkUp uses automatic tools to find jobs listed only on company websites, compiling listings for its users. There aren’t any duplicates — or scams — as you can often find on sites that accept listings from anybody.
    4. Idealist
      More and more job hunters are placing an emphasis on finding a job that offers some opportunity to give back. Idealist lists jobs from non-profits and idealist organizations. While the site does include volunteer work, it also includes paid positions as well as internships and consulting opportunities.
    5. RealMatch
      A good job interview isn’t that different from a blind date, and RealMatch takes that fact into account. It relies on a set of tests to match you with job opportunities that you’ve displayed a certain level of compatibility with — as well as sending your information to employers looking for someone who meets your profile.
    6. JobSerf
      While most job sites these days are free, JobSerf charges $98 per week. For that fee, you get 20 hours of personalized job searching: one of JobSerf’s professionals searches for jobs that meet your criteria and apply to those positions that meet your needs. The price may seem a little steep if you’re only casually looking, but it could be a better fit if you’re seriously job hunting.
    7. SimplyHired
      Rather than searching thousands of websites and sorting through job listings that ambitious recruiters have posted all over, I’d suggest checking out SimplyHired. It searches a long list of job listing sites, as well as specific companies’ hiring pages, providing you with a fairly complete picture of your options with just one search.
    8. SoloGig
      Just looking for something short-term? SoloGig provides listings of consulting, temporary, contract and freelance opportunities in a broad list of categories. It might not get you a long-term job, but the right project can often help you take your resume up a notch. Furthermore, some of the short-term projects listed on SoloGig are expected to last a year or more.
    9. Women for Hire
      While the jobs available through Women for Hire are available to men as well as women, the site provides a special level of support for women who are hunting for jobs. It offers up specialized advice on issues like finding positions that offer help with child care. Women for Hire goes far beyond the traditional job boards to offer specialized help for women looking for new jobs.
    10. Job-Hunt
      When you search for a job online, you’ll often get a good picture of the jobs that are available on a national — or even international level. Just because those jobs are available doesn’t mean that you’re ready to pick up and move for them, though. Job-Hunt has a long list of links to job hunting resources by state, giving you a head start on local job leads.

    There are a couple of other sites worth keeping an eye on these days: Most state governments have centralized job listings like USAJobs. It might be worth signing up for the RSS feed or email alert on your state’s site. The same is true of your alumni career office. Most schools offer alumni career support indefinitely, and solicit job listings from other alumni. And don’t forget your local want ads — most newspapers make their classified ads available online. Many employers still list their job openings exclusively with their local newspaper, so it’s worth looking locally.

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    No matter which sites fit what you might be looking for, just about all of them (with the exception of JobSerf) allow you to either receive new job leads through RSS or email. Even if you’re only looking passively for any opportunities that might cross your computer screen, keeping an eye on these websites can help you get word of perfect fits that may not hit the standard job boards.

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    Last Updated on November 18, 2020

    15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It)

    15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It)

    It’s okay, you can finally admit it. It’s been two months since you’ve seen the inside of the gym. Getting sick, family crisis, overtime at work and school papers that needed to get finished all kept you for exercising. Now, the question is: how do you start again?
    Once you have an exercise habit, it becomes automatic. You just go to the gym, there is no force involved. But after a month, two months or possibly a year off, it can be hard to get started again. Here are some tips to climb back on that treadmill after you’ve fallen off.

    1. Don’t Break the Habit – The easiest way to keep things going is simply not to stop. Avoid long breaks in exercising or rebuilding the habit will take some effort. This may be advice a little too late for some people. But if you have an exercise habit going, don’t drop it at the first sign of trouble.
    2. Reward Showing Up – Woody Allen once said that, “Half of life is showing up.” I’d argue that 90% of making a habit is just making the effort to get there. You can worry about your weight, amount of laps you run or the amount you can bench press later.
    3. Commit for Thirty Days – Make a commitment to go every day (even just for 20 minutes) for one month. This will solidify the exercise habit. By making a commitment you also take pressure off yourself in the first weeks back of deciding whether to go.
    4. Make it Fun – If you don’t enjoy yourself at the gym, it is going to be hard to keep it a habit. There are thousands of ways you can move your body and exercise, so don’t give up if you’ve decided lifting weights or doing crunches isn’t for you. Many large fitness centers will offer a range of programs that can suit your tastes.
    5. Schedule During Quiet Hours – Don’t put exercise time in a place where it will easily be pushed aside by something more important. Right after work or first thing in the morning are often good places to put it. Lunch-hour workouts might be too easy to skip if work demands start mounting.
    6. Get a Buddy – Grab a friend to join you. Having a social aspect to exercising can boost your commitment to the exercise habit.
    7. X Your Calendar – One person I know has the habit of drawing a red “X” through any day on the calendar he goes to the gym. The benefit of this is it quickly shows how long it has been since you’ve gone to the gym. Keeping a steady amount of X’s on your calendar is an easy way to motivate yourself.
    8. Enjoyment Before Effort – After you finish any work out, ask yourself what parts you enjoyed and what parts you did not. As a rule, the enjoyable aspects of your workout will get done and the rest will be avoided. By focusing on how you can make workouts more enjoyable, you can make sure you want to keep going to the gym.
    9. Create a Ritual – Your workout routine should become so ingrained that it becomes a ritual. This means that the time of day, place or cue automatically starts you towards grabbing your bag and heading out. If your workout times are completely random, it will be harder to benefit from the momentum of a ritual.
    10. Stress Relief – What do you do when your stressed? Chances are it isn’t running. But exercise can be a great way to relieve stress, releasing endorphin which will improve your mood. The next time you feel stressed or tired, try doing an exercise you enjoy. When stress relief is linked to exercise, it is easy to regain the habit even after a leave of absence.
    11. Measure Fitness – Weight isn’t always the best number to track. Increase in muscle can offset decreases in fat so the scale doesn’t change even if your body is. But fitness improvements are a great way to stay motivated. Recording simple numbers such as the number of push-ups, sit-ups or speed you can run can help you see that the exercise is making you stronger and faster.
    12. Habits First, Equipment Later – Fancy equipment doesn’t create a habit for exercise. Despite this, some people still believe that buying a thousand dollar machine will make up for their inactivity. It won’t. Start building the exercise habit first, only afterwards should you worry about having a personal gym.
    13. Isolate Your Weakness – If falling off the exercise wagon is a common occurrence for you, find out why. Do you not enjoy exercising? Is it a lack of time? Is it feeling self-conscious at the gym? Is it a lack of fitness know-how? As soon as you can isolate your weakness, you can make steps to improve the situation.
    14. Start Small – Trying to run fifteen miles your first workout isn’t a good way to build a habit. Work below your capacity for the first few weeks to build the habit. Otherwise you might scare yourself off after a brutal workout.
    15. Go for Yourself, Not to Impress – Going to the gym with the only goal of looking great is like starting a business with only the goal to make money. The effort can’t justify the results. But if you go to the gym to push yourself, gain energy and have a good time, then you can keep going even when results are slow.

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