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20 Things to Do When You Are Bored With Life

20 Things to Do When You Are Bored With Life

The definition of boring is dull or not interesting. The following is a list of 20 things that can definitely make any day more interesting. Some of them are silly, while some are more meaningful, so hopefully just reading the list makes your life less boring and sparks your creativity.

Have your own idea? Go ahead and drop it in the comments below the post.

20 Things That Will Make Your Life Less Boring

1. Channel your seven-year-old self. What would he or she want to do right now? Color? Paint? Run around outside? Play dress up? Eat with your hands? Play that instrument hiding in the back of your closet that you haven’t touched in years? Just because you’re a grown up doesn’t mean any of this stuff will be less enjoyable than you remember it. Give yourself permission to play.

2. Speaking of little kids, if you have your own or access to any (in a non-creepy way, like they’re your niece or your best friend’s kid, you get the idea) go play with them! They didn’t create an entire show called Kids Say The Darndest Things because kids aren’t hilarious. They also keep things so simple, and we can really stand to be reminded of this and stop allowing ourselves to get bogged down in boring details.

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3. Order a hot dog. While you’re eating it, Google: “What’s in a hot dog?” You decide whether or not you want to finish it.

4. This one is for the ladies: wear your sexiest lingerie under your work clothes. Your “little secret” will leave you feeling anything but boring all day!

5. Play cell phone roulette. You’ll need at least one buddy for this. Scroll through the contacts in your phone, stop on a random one and call the person. Could spark an incredible catch up session. Could be incredibly awkward. Neither are boring.

6. Fill out a pack of Thank-You cards. Give them to random people who probably don’t get thanked too often for doing what they do ever day. Ideas: police officers, librarians, servers, baristas, cab drivers, sanitation workers, teachers, people behind any check out counter, receptionists, your friends, the guy at the falafel stand, etc.

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7. Sign up for a class in something you’ve “always wanted to do”, or something that makes you really uncomfortable. Ideas: pole dancing, salsa lessons, improv, pottery, cooking, knitting (yup, there are classes for this, too!), karate, boxing, something techy like the workshops they run in Apple stores, get Rosetta Stone and learn that language you’ve always wanted to speak, etc.

8. Interview your grandparents about their life. You can bet they’ve had some crazy experiences you probably never knew about.

9. Get up on stage at an open mic night whether you’re funny or not (and if you’re not, memorize a few of your favorite jokes and tell those!)

10. Do something for someone else that you wish someone would do for you. We all have a few ideas on this list. I promise you will feel amazing after and anything but bored.

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11. Start a DIY project in your home. Doesn’t have to be super complicated. If you need ideas, I’m pretty sure this is what Pinterest was invented for.

12. Plan a weekend trip or an all-out vacation. This will give you something to look forward to.

13. People watch. Find a bench in a crowded area (centers of transportation like airports, bus stops and train stations are great for this!) and just observe. People are infinitely interesting.

14. Eat something you’ve never eaten before. Bonus points if it’s a random fruit or veggie.

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15. Dance. You can get your friends together for a night on the town or just pull up a video on YouTube and bust a move from your own living room. If you’re feeling extra brave, you can even dance in public and get other people involved like my good friend Laura did here.

16. Go to YouTube and search “People falling on Segways.” This is also a great quickie ab workout as you will be laughing hysterically.

17. Check out the NY Times Best Sellers lists and grab a new book you can get lost in.

18. Step away from the computer and go get some time with people you care about IRL. (That stands for In Real Life). Facebook stalking doesn’t count as real social interaction. You can even share this post with your friends and vote on which one you’d like to do together!

19. Check out a museum you’ve never been to before. OK, depending on your interests, this one might actually be boring. If you love learning, art or different cultures though, this one is for you!

20. Leave your fly down intentionally all day. See how many people notice.

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The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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