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These 20 Images Of Child Labor Will Make You Speechless

These 20 Images Of Child Labor Will Make You Speechless

Though over a decade ago the International Labor Organization (ILO) named June 12 World Day Against Child Labor, there are still millions of children throughout the world who are employed illegally.They miss out on education and the joy that should make up a happy childhood.

Child labor is mentally, physically and emotionally draining, and in extreme cases can be classed as enslavement.

Below are 20 images of child labor taken around the world. What they do for a living will make you speechless…

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    Shaheen, 10, works at an aluminium factory. Taken in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on November 16, 2009.

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      Masud, 6, collects spare vehicle parts in Dholaikhal, Dhaka, Bangladesh, on February 29, 2012.

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        Naginah Sadiq, 5, works in a brick factory collecting clay in Islamabad, Pakistan, on June 12, 2012.

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          Taken in Lad Rymbai, in the district of Jaintia Hills, India on April 16, 2011. Many local parents refuse to let their children go to school despite the fact they provide free tuition.

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            Takenin Chheuteal village, Kandal province, Cambodia, on May 2, 2011. This girl dries bricks for a brick factory.

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              Takenin Khartoum, Sudan, on September 17, 2011. Like many people in the Darfur region, this boy makes money by forming mud blocks.

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                Taken in New Delhi, India, on June 12, 2012. This young boy is cleaning bike parts, possibly to sell.

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                  Taken in Dhaka, on April 19, 2012. Another young boy works in an aluminium factory. It’s thought that over 6 million children under the age of 14 in Bangladesh work.

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                    Jacques Monkotan, 4, works in an excavation site in Dassa-Zoume, Benin, on February 25, 2007.

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                      Takenin NayPyiTaw, Burma on December 6, 2011. This young girl carries cement needed for a new hotel.

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                        Czoton, 7, is employe at a balloon factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on November 23, 2009.

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                          Hazrat, 7, works at a brick factory inJalalabad, Afghanistan.

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                            Rustam, 10, works in an aluminium factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh. 25 other children work with him for 12 hours a day.

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                              This child is an illegal immigrant who collects plastic at a rubbish dump in Mae Sot, Thailand.

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                                This child arranges bricks on the outskirts of Herat, Afghanistan.

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                                  Another young child works in a rubbish dump in Islamabad, Pakistan.

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                                    Issa, 10, works in a weapons factory for the Free Syrian Army in Aleppo.

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                                      Numerous children refill cigarettes with locally grown tobacco in the Haragach in Rangpur district, Bangladesh.

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                                        This child is looking for recyclable plastic in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

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                                          Paulo Henrique Felix da Silveira, 9, scavenged in theSaramandaia slum in Recife, Brazil. A 2010 study found that 3.6% of the 20,166 people who collect rubbish are aged 10 – 17.

                                          Featured photo credit: Reuters/Andrew Biraj via theatlantic.com

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                                          Last Updated on December 2, 2018

                                          7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                                          7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

                                          When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

                                          You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

                                          1. Connecting them with each other

                                          Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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                                          It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

                                          2. Connect with their emotions

                                          Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

                                          For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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                                          3. Keep going back to the beginning

                                          Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

                                          On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

                                          4. Link to your audience’s motivation

                                          After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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                                          Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

                                          5. Entertain them

                                          While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

                                          Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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                                          6. Appeal to loyalty

                                          Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

                                          In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

                                          7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

                                          Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

                                          Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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