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51 Slang Terms You May Not Be Familiar With

51 Slang Terms You May Not Be Familiar With

Most of us are pretty familiar with slang terms from the last hundred years or so, but there are some that the average person might not be that well versed in anymore. For example, an expression like “the bee’s knees” would have been heard fairly often back in the 1930s, and in the ’60s, referring to something as being “a gas” had nothing to do with flatulence. Let’s take a look at some slang terms from the past century to see which ones have stuck around, and which have bitten the dust.

1910s

Butterflies in the Stomach: The feeling of nervousness or anxiety that manifests in a fluttery belly feeling. This one has certainly stuck around!

Goopy: Stupid or foolish, often in reference to going along with something dumb that another was doing.

Bonehead: An idiotic or stupid person.

Doohickey: Some object for which the name is either unknown, or unremembered at that point in time. “That doohickey fell off my car again.”

1920s

The Cat’s Meow: Something splendid or stylish.

On the Level: Honest, truthful. “You had breakfast with the President? Are you on the level?”

Giggle Water: An alcoholic beverage; a drink that makes you giddy and giggly. This one should absolutely be brought back into common vernacular.

Tearjerker: A sentimental story or movie that brings the viewer/reader to tears.

1930s

Hooch: Bootleg alcohol. Prohibition made booze illegal in a lot of places, so people would sell homemade “hooch” under the table.

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Go Bananas: To go absolutely crazy/lose control.

Gams: A woman’s legs. “That dame’s got great gams.”

Chintzy: Cheaply made and vulgar-looking. “He gave me a chintzy plastic tablecloth for my birthday. What was he thinking?”

Speedo: The speedometer on a car. (Rather different from the modern connotation, isn’t it?)

1940s

Chicken Out: To back away from something out of cowardice.

Spook: As a verb, “spook” referred to creeping someone out; as a noun, it referred to a spy.

Dope: Information, usually fairly secret info about someone. “Hey, have you heard the dope on Sally?”

Bust Rocks: To serve time in prison; possibly in reference to doing hard labor while incarcerated.

1950s

Bread: This term for money/cash lasted well into the ’70s, but then died out.

Junk: Refers to heroin, rather than the completely different connotation it carries now.

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In a Pickle: In trouble; in a jam. “Danny found himself in a pickle when his stolen car broke down outside the cop shop.”

Out of This World: Spectacular, amazing.

1960s

The Damage: The cost of something. “Wow, that was a great meal. Okay, what’s the damage?”

Groovy: Very cool. You won’t hear this one much anymore unless someone’s saying it ironically.

Knock-Off: An illegal copy. “She bought a knock-off Prada bag, but the label was misspelled as ‘Parda.’ You’d think that would have been a clue that it wasn’t legit.”

Douchebag: A weak, indecisive person (usually male), or someone who’s just a complete jerk.

-ville (suffix): Grouping a bunch of things together to indicate their general definition. “My parents’ place was dullsville this weekend.”

1970s

Give Some Skin: To shake hands or give a slow high-five, usually in congratulations.

Boondocks: Out in the middle of nowhere. “His new house is out in the boondocks, man…I think his closest neighbor’s a squirrel.”

“No Way, Jose!”: Absolutely not. No. Not gonna happen.

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Hammered: Unbelievably drunk. “Tito got totally hammered after drinking thirty vodka spritzers.”

Shades: Sunglasses.

1980s

Awesome: Spectacular/great.

Kryptonite: An item that is a person’s weakness. “I just can’t stay away from Kelly; she’s my kryptonite.”

“Whatever.”: Expression of utter indifference.

Eye Candy: Something attractive or otherwise pleasing to the eye.

Sketchy: Questionable, possibly dirty or dangerous. “That’s a sketchy neighborhood; walk there at night and you might get mugged.”

1990s

Chillax: Chilled out and relaxing all at once, usually while socializing with others.

Poser: Someone who pretends to be important, or tries to be part of a group that they’re absolutely unsuited to.

Ugly Stick: An imaginary object that makes anything hideous when smacked with it. “Dude, where the hell did you get that shirt? You look like you’ve been hit with the ugly stick.”

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Five-Finger Discount: Shoplifting.

Buff: Muscular. “He was totally buff after working out for eight hours a day, every day for a month.”

2000s

Peeps: People, especially those in one’s own social or familial circle. “Don’t mess with my peeps.”

Green: Eco-friendly.

Newbie: A newcomer. Also referred to as “noob” or “n00b”. “He totally pwned a bunch of n00bs playing WOW last night.”

Bling: Shiny, expensive jewelery, generally worn to be overly showy.

Cougar: An older woman who sleeps with (preys upon?) younger men.

2010s

Tricked-Out: Highly decorated and ameliorated, usually in reference to a car.

Crack- (prefix): A reference to something that a person is addicted to. “I swear, I check Crackbook (Facebook) a hundred times a day.”

Bromance: A close, non-sexual friendship between males.

Unfriend: To end a friendship with someone; used in reference to deleting someone from the Facebook “friends” list.

Precious: Truly hideous. “Did you see Maya’s new jacket? Purple leopard print with rhinestones and ribbons is just so…precious.”

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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