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6 Quick Ways To Get Motivated When You Feel Lazy

6 Quick Ways To Get Motivated When You Feel Lazy

Let’s face it: even though bragging about how lazy you are on the Internet is for some reason constantly applauded, you can’t be lazy your whole life. At some point, you have to turn off Netflix and get something done. In an effort to help those who want to get up and do something great with their life, here are six things to try when you find yourself feeling lazy.

1. Focus on just one or two things.

Most of the time laziness is the product of a full plate and no idea where to start. When you try to tackle everything at once, it’s hard not to feel like this:

But when you focus on one or two things at a time, it’s easier to get motivated and not feel so overwhelmed. Once you’ve found the strength to get up and finish one thing, deep down the thought, “hey, maybe I can do this” starts to creep in. Next thing you know, your whole list is done and you’re fist pumping in celebration with all your friends!

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2. Exercise.

Maybe you really don’t know where to start on your massive to-do list. If that’s the case, go exercise.

You’ll feel a lot better about yourself and have more energy. #endorphinsftw. Plus, while you exercise, your brain activates, which helps you find answers to your problems you hadn’t thought of before. In Born To Run, a book about some of the craziest running athletes ever, the author says, “If you don’t have answers to your problems after a four-hour run, you ain’t getting them.” I’m not saying you should go on a four-hour run, but you get the point. Once your mind has convinced itself it knows what to do, your body can easily follow suit. It’s hard to be lazy when everything inside of you is running on all cylinders.

3. Allow yourself time to relax and rest.


While exercise is good, the gospel of R&R is as true as ever. There is a big difference between being lazy and resting. Laziness has no purpose. Resting is necessary for life and clears your mind so you can tackle your endeavors head on. Maybe you’ve been working on a project for too long and you’re burned out. Try sleeping on it. Let yourself have some time to rest. Our bodies and minds need rest to function at optimal levels.

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4. Get organized.

If your thoughts are a mess, hash them out in a notebook or on a whiteboard. When everything is in front of you, it’s easier to organize your thoughts. If you don’t have your thoughts organized, it’s hard to feel motivated to do anything. In addition to organizing your thoughts, maybe you need to get physically organized as well. Cleaning your room or work area is a great way to create an atmosphere of productivity. Most people work better in an organized, clean work space. Even if you don’t think that’s your problem, it’s worth a try. What if taking the time to get organized is exactly what you need to find the motivation to get going and flaming roundhouse kick your to-do list in the face?

5. Be aware of your self talk.

Often, being lazy is a result of negative self-talk. You convince yourself there’s nothing you can do or that there is too much on your plate. You won’t get anywhere with that attitude. Quit putting yourself down and start believing in yourself. Even if you don’t feel like it, tell yourself you can do it. Say it out loud. If you have to go to a private place so you don’t feel dumb, do it. Positive self-talk leads to positive thinking which leads to productive action. You’ll never get anything done if you keep telling yourself you can’t do anything.

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6. Search YouTube.

This may seem counterproductive, but YouTube can be used for more than cats and music videos. There are a thousand different videos on YouTube that will make you feel like you could pick up a mountain and throw it to Mars. This ought to get you started:

Featured photo credit: Hector Garcia via flickr.com

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The Gentle Art of Saying No

The Gentle Art of Saying No

No!

It’s a simple fact that you can never be productive if you take on too many commitments — you simply spread yourself too thin and will not be able to get anything done, at least not well or on time.

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But requests for your time are coming in all the time — through phone, email, IM or in person. To stay productive, and minimize stress, you have to learn the Gentle Art of Saying No — an art that many people have problems with.

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What’s so hard about saying no? Well, to start with, it can hurt, anger or disappoint the person you’re saying “no” to, and that’s not usually a fun task. Second, if you hope to work with that person in the future, you’ll want to continue to have a good relationship with that person, and saying “no” in the wrong way can jeopardize that.

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But it doesn’t have to be difficult or hard on your relationship. Here are the Top 10 tips for learning the Gentle Art of Saying No:

  1. Value your time. Know your commitments, and how valuable your precious time is. Then, when someone asks you to dedicate some of your time to a new commitment, you’ll know that you simply cannot do it. And tell them that: “I just can’t right now … my plate is overloaded as it is.”
  2. Know your priorities. Even if you do have some extra time (which for many of us is rare), is this new commitment really the way you want to spend that time? For myself, I know that more commitments means less time with my wife and kids, who are more important to me than anything.
  3. Practice saying no. Practice makes perfect. Saying “no” as often as you can is a great way to get better at it and more comfortable with saying the word. And sometimes, repeating the word is the only way to get a message through to extremely persistent people. When they keep insisting, just keep saying no. Eventually, they’ll get the message.
  4. Don’t apologize. A common way to start out is “I’m sorry but …” as people think that it sounds more polite. While politeness is important, apologizing just makes it sound weaker. You need to be firm, and unapologetic about guarding your time.
  5. Stop being nice. Again, it’s important to be polite, but being nice by saying yes all the time only hurts you. When you make it easy for people to grab your time (or money), they will continue to do it. But if you erect a wall, they will look for easier targets. Show them that your time is well guarded by being firm and turning down as many requests (that are not on your top priority list) as possible.
  6. Say no to your boss. Sometimes we feel that we have to say yes to our boss — they’re our boss, right? And if we say “no” then we look like we can’t handle the work — at least, that’s the common reasoning. But in fact, it’s the opposite — explain to your boss that by taking on too many commitments, you are weakening your productivity and jeopardizing your existing commitments. If your boss insists that you take on the project, go over your project or task list and ask him/her to re-prioritize, explaining that there’s only so much you can take on at one time.
  7. Pre-empting. It’s often much easier to pre-empt requests than to say “no” to them after the request has been made. If you know that requests are likely to be made, perhaps in a meeting, just say to everyone as soon as you come into the meeting, “Look guys, just to let you know, my week is booked full with some urgent projects and I won’t be able to take on any new requests.”
  8. Get back to you. Instead of providing an answer then and there, it’s often better to tell the person you’ll give their request some thought and get back to them. This will allow you to give it some consideration, and check your commitments and priorities. Then, if you can’t take on the request, simply tell them: “After giving this some thought, and checking my commitments, I won’t be able to accommodate the request at this time.” At least you gave it some consideration.
  9. Maybe later. If this is an option that you’d like to keep open, instead of just shutting the door on the person, it’s often better to just say, “This sounds like an interesting opportunity, but I just don’t have the time at the moment. Perhaps you could check back with me in [give a time frame].” Next time, when they check back with you, you might have some free time on your hands.
  10. It’s not you, it’s me. This classic dating rejection can work in other situations. Don’t be insincere about it, though. Often the person or project is a good one, but it’s just not right for you, at least not at this time. Simply say so — you can compliment the idea, the project, the person, the organization … but say that it’s not the right fit, or it’s not what you’re looking for at this time. Only say this if it’s true — people can sense insincerity.

Featured photo credit: Pexels via pexels.com

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