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5 Fun Things You Can Do if You’re Single on Valentine’s Day

5 Fun Things You Can Do if You’re Single on Valentine’s Day

I know it’s easy to get jealous and frustrated if you’re single on Valentine’s Day, since all the happy couples you know could be sharing cute photos and lovey-dovey status updates all day. Also, if you’re brave enough to go to a bar/restaurant/or movie, you will be surrounded by public displays of affection. I know it’s tempting to say, “Get a room,” but please resist the urge (because nobody likes a Negative Ned or Nancy, and complaining about things you don’t like won’t make them go away). But don’t fret, dear reader; with a positive attitude and a little creativity, you can have just as much fun as every happy couple you encounter… even if you’re single on Valentine’s Day.

1. Laugh it up!

Laughter boosts your mood, reduces stress, and makes you feel better. On Valentine’s day, have your own funny movie marathon, enjoy some stand-up comedy and laugh to your heart’s content! Cuddle up on the couch with your pet(s) and a cozy blanket to laugh it up. Treat yourself to a cheap and healthy snack like natural popcorn or yogurt mixed with berries and dark chocolate. If you’re looking for movie suggestions, here’s an obvious one:

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Or, if stand-up is more your thing, you could have some giggle-fits with Aziz Ansari:

2. Have a Singles Party!

Get together with some of your single friends and have a get together! If you’d like to turn your private celebration into a fun party, invite some friends over who are also members of Club Single. Ask them to bring a snack (or maybe even a bottle of wine?) and laugh the night away. If you would rather go out on the town, you might be helped by this list of fifty cheap and fun night-out ideas.

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3. Treat yourself!

I know the idea of taking yourself on a date might sound kind of strange, but this is one of the best ways to learn how to be happy alone. A massage will relieve any tension built up from stress at work or home; a make-over will give you a fresh, exciting look that increases your confidence; going to a restaurant or movie alone will help you become more comfortable by yourself (and you can even choose to go where you want to go without debating the issue with friends or family); and retail therapy is almost always a good idea.

4. Catch up with someone you miss.

It’s easy to lose touch with the special people who add meaning to our lives when we get busy with life. If you’re single on Valentine’s Day, why not take the opportunity to catch-up with a close friend who you haven’t talked to in months or years? Thanks to the power of the Internet, location is irrelevant; you can chat face-to-face with a friend who lives on the other side of the world, just like the Jetsons predicted 50 years ago, with the magic of Skype or Google Hangouts. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0idWiHiasKg

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5. Do whatever you want.

Please don’t read this article as a list of things you absolutely should do. This list is meant to provide you with some inspiration to guide you in the right direction, but you are the CEO of your life, so you should take full ownership of your actions. No one knows you better than yourself, so do whatever makes you feel happy and fulfilled, whatever that might be.

It can be a bummer to be single on Valentine’s Day, but only if you allow it to be.

You deserve to be happy, with or without a partner, so do everything in your power to make this holiday a positive occasion. If you’re a member of Club Single and wonder why that could be, you might want to check-out these potential reasons why you are still single. If you have more fun ideas for things to do if you’re single on Valentine’s Day, please share them in the comments. <3

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More by this author

Daniel Wallen

Daniel is a writer who focuses on blogging about happiness and motivation at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on January 12, 2021

Why We Say What We Won’t Do (but Still Say It Anyway)

Why We Say What We Won’t Do (but Still Say It Anyway)

Every day we say a lot about what we want and will do.

“I want to pet a cat.”

“I want to buy a house for my parents.”

“I don’t want to be single anymore.”

“I will love you no matter what.”

“I will work harder in the future.”

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    It’s easy to make plans for the future. And we make resolutions all the time. Consider that a full 80% of resolutions fail by the second week of February.[1] And that a vast majority of relationships (plus many marriages) end as well with break-ups or divorce. The best intentions and the best-laid plans generally speaking end in failure.

    No one intended to lie

    In general, people make these kinds of promises or resolutions with the best intentions. They don’t want to fail; if anything, they want desperately to be right, to improve themselves, and to make their friends and family happy. So even if a resolution doesn’t work out, when they utter them, it’s far from a lie.

      People often speak without thinking. They say what comes to mind, but without really thinking it through. And what usually comes to mind is wishful thinking – the ideal result, not what’s possible and practical. It’s tempting to fantasize about a beautiful and perfect future: a good romantic relationship, to have the approval and respect of your parents, and to have a successful career.

      But how to get what you want is not always clear to you in the moment you utter it. It’s hard to see beyond just the easy, idealized image. The challenges you may come across, the disappointments and sadness you may face – none of that is anywhere to be seen in a daydreaming mind.

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      Wishful thinking often end in crushing disappointment

      The problem is this. Wishful thinking and fantasies will only end in disappointment if you don’t follow through. You disappoint your friends, your family, your boss, and – most importantly – yourself. This can really take a toll on your own psyche and sense of self-worth.

            At a personal level, you’ll have so many unfulfilled dreams and goals. This is an incredibly common situation for people everywhere. As a teenager, you might have dreamed of what your life would be like as an adult: happily married and with a successful and high-earning career by the time you’re 25. But these are two seriously challenging goals that take planning and effort. Many people find themselves alone and in a dead-end job – rather than a career – wondering where they went wrong.

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                On an interpersonal level, making empty promises is hurtful and damaging to relationships. Friendship and healthy family relationships are built on trust. People who want to be your friend take you at your word and expect you to follow through. If you tell your friends that you’ll “be there for them,” but never pick up the phone, they will be hurt and no longer want to hang out. The same is true for family or even professional relationships. You might find it tempting to tell your boss that you’ll finish a major project “by the end of the week,” without considering whether this is plausible. If you are unable to complete the task in the timeframe that you set, it’s not easy to regain your boss’s trust.

                Keep what you want to yourself

                It’s vital to be clear about what you want. Notice when people around you are prone to saying “I want ___” and “I don’t want ____.”

                Kids are very prone to saying all their wants out loud, partly because they don’t have the independence and resources to get it themselves. This is why children and young people are often vague about what they want in the future. They have lots of wants without a concrete plan on how to get them.

                This is one of the challenges of being an adult. As you gain the practical ability to provide for yourself, and as you learn from your mistakes, it’s more and more important to be clear about how you plan to get what you want.

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                  Practice visualizing plans to attain your goals. For example, you might want a pet – everyone shares pictures of their dogs and cats on Instagram! But before you go out to adopt one at the shelter, make sure you visualize all the things you have to do to take care of your pet. Pet-ownership involves: cleaning up after it, house-training it, taking it to the vet, walking it, buying it food, and making sure that it gets plenty of stimulation and exercise.

                  If you want or need a car, think about how much you need to save to purchase the car, the cleaning and maintenance costs, how to pay for regular car insurance, parking costs, et cetera.

                    If you really want something, don’t just say it. Plan for it and do it. Create conditions that make what you want inevitable. Do small things consistently and make it a habit. You’ll amaze yourself and your friends if you constantly work on attaining your goals. Read more about how to follow through your goals here: Why I Can Be the Only 8% of People Who Reach the Goal Every Single Time

                    It’s easy to make or break promises. Set yourself apart from others by being reliable, deliberate, and thoughtful. Match your intentions with planning and action, and you’ll find that you’re happier with yourself and that your relationships are enriched.

                    Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

                    Reference

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