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25 Simple And Creative Ways To Cheer Someone Up

25 Simple And Creative Ways To Cheer Someone Up

Life can get pretty rough sometimes and there is nothing worse than seeing a friend or a loved one in pain. Follow one or two of these easy tips on how to cheer someone up and make someone’s day better. You’ll feel good for having made the effort and the person being cheered up will learn how much you truly care.

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    1. Listen Up

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      When life gets overwhelming it helps to have someone willing to listen. Sometimes, a person just needs to vent. Allow the person you know to air out their problem. This does not put you in the position of solving the problem for them. There are times when a solution may present itself simply through talking to someone else. Your job is to listen and then let it go.

      2. Give Hugs

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        It sounds so simple, it’s stupid. But hugging someone truly relieves stress and can make another feel a lot better. Hugging is a great stress reliever for both parties and is very helpful when there are no words. Research shows that oxytocin, a chemical that is a natural stress reliever, is released in the brain when hugging. A hug conveys loving care when mere words just won’t do.

        3. Give Them a Handwritten Note or Card

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          Whether you are near or far, a handwritten note or card can be very meaningful. It shows you are paying attention and the card can be referred to again and again by the person who really needs a word of encouragement. You’ll also be demonstrating to someone that you cared enough to take the time to write out an encouraging message and send it. Take a few moments from your day to let someone who’s hurting know how much you care.

          4. Have a Chuckle

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            The old adage, “Laughter is the best medicine,” certainly applies here. Help your friend or loved one to a good laugh at the situation. After all, nothing, not even pain—to paraphrase Charlie Chaplin—lasts forever. Use puns, jokes, or sarcasm to help another crack a hearty smile. Laughing just makes a person feel better and a good laugh might help to put a new spin or perspective on the situation.

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            5. Make Them Dinner

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              Click the link above to find foods that relieve stress. Plus, there is an added bonus to sharing food with another person; it gives them a chance to relax and perhaps more comfortably share their problem. Budgets are understandably tight these days, so the meal need not be expensive. Breaking bread with someone can be very calming, soothing, and relaxing. It may also help get the person’s mind off their troubles.

              6. Share a Walk

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                Walking has a multitude of benefits, among them walking is a stress reliever. Taking a stroll through the neighborhood may be just the right thing for the person you know who needs cheering up. A walk is free and getting a little fresh air is very beneficial. Walking has a way of soothing nerves and serving to help someone who is tense to relax. Just the thing for someone who is experiencing a temporary set back.

                7. Have a Movie Night

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                  Gather some favorite snacks and share a movie. Click the link above for a list of movies that are sure to tickle the funny bone. If tears are in order, by all means grab a box of tissue and find a sad story. Sometimes, tears can be as cathartic as laughter. Or choose a movie, such as Steel Magnolias, that is a good mix of comedy and drama. Either way, a movie is a good way to help someone who is troubled take their mind off of the problem for a while.

                  8. A Spa Experience

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                    Having a spa day need not be expensive. The above link provides tips for a DIY spa day treat. A spa day can be a real treat for you both. Relax, unwind, and simply enjoy one another’s company. Treat yourself and a friend or loved one and essentially “stop the world” for an hour or so. You’ll both feel relaxed, refreshed, and simply pampered. A spa day is just a great way to hit the ground running again.

                    9. Volunteer Together

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                      Believe it or not, offering to volunteer is a great stress reliever. Research has definitively proven that volunteering helps a person sleep better, gain a new perspective, and raises self-esteem. There are many opportunities to lend a helping hand. Tutoring, homeless shelters, or any favored charity are all great places to get started. Plus, you’ll have the added benefit of a shared experience with someone who really needs the lift.

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                      10. Host a Staycation

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                        Have a getaway without going anywhere? Yes, it is indeed possible. Treat your pal or loved one by doing a thorough house cleaning. Or pack a picnic lunch for just the two of you and visit the local park. If there is a national park nearby, so much the better. Take an afternoon to enjoy the sights in your community that you may have otherwise taken for granted. Explore the nearby community for hidden treasures, you may be surprised at what you find.

                        11. Do a Simple Remodel

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                          Redecorating need not be expensive or time consuming. The real plus here is that a simple project can bring worlds of pleasure and a brand new perspective on things. Something as simple as rearranging furniture can bring a whole new look to a room. Raid the local secondhand store for used dinner plates and hang these to bring a new look to a room. Purchase some inexpensive frames and frame a child’s artwork to brighten a room.

                          12. Do Some Gardening

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                            Working with plants and the soil is relaxing and a fantastic stress reliever. Team up and do some gardening, to which there are a number of benefits. You will be benefiting the environment, as well as sprucing up the home. Physical exertion is an added benefit, to help sleep better. Leave the phone inside in order to disconnect from the world; unwanted calls can be distracting and increase stress.

                            13. Ask Open-Ended Questions

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                              Sometimes it helps to allow a friend or loved one to expand on their problem and a possible solution. Asking open-ended questions in order to enable a flow of ideas. Help by asking and by listening in return to relieve stress. You will assist the person through developing a sense of ownership of the problem and in developing a resolution to it. You will both benefit through increasing and strengthening communication skills.

                              14. Brainstorm

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                                Sit down and allow the ideas to flow freely when seeking to resolve the situation. Take a piece of paper and write down ideas as they come without judgment. The key here is to write down ideas freely. Some may be silly and that is an absolutely perfect opportunity to spend some time giggling about a situation that is seemingly overwhelming. Brainstorming provides an opportunity to think about a problem and its possible solutions.

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                                15. Be Silly

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                                  Take time to just be silly. Try the Schwarzenegger Soundboard to make silly messages for one another. Play a game of charades together. Tie an old pantyhose leg to a belt loop, drop in an orange, and try to knock a second orange past the goal line. If there is snow, go ahead and team up to build a silly snowman for the entire neighborhood to enjoy. Dress it up or down, it doesn’t matter just have a little fun.

                                  16. Don’t Sympathize, Empathize

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                                    Feeling sorry for someone is no help. There was a time when you struggled and felt defeated. Use these feelings to put yourself in their shoes. You know how it feels and it feels very bad. Communicate your willingness to listen, while avoiding allowing the person to wallow in their mistake. In fact, your experience can help guide the other person back to being happy and productive.

                                    17. Cry It Out

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                                      There are benefits to allowing the person to cry it out. While it may sound counterproductive, allowing someone to grieve their disappointment or loss often leads to better feelings. Having a good old-fashioned cry is a wonderful stress reliever. Negative emotions are released, making room for more positive thinking and feelings. Shedding tears has been found to release more than negativity, it has also been show to release poisons in the body.

                                      18. Go Shopping

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                                        “Retail therapy” is sometimes disparaged. Give a quick lift by doing a little shopping. The spree need not be expensive. Set a budget and hit up secondhand, consignment, and thrift stores. Spend time together and purchase something that is entirely frivolous. If money is a problem, purchase and return the item later. Veer away from purchasing anything that is a “need.” This trip is all about a want, just remember to help your pal or loved one not to go overboard with spending.

                                        19. Help Set Goals

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                                          Setting goals can be a tremendous help to someone who needs cheering up. Achieving small accomplishments can also lead to clearer thinking and mood improvement. The goals need not be complicated, but rather remain simple steps to achieving a set goal or objective. Sit down and help write out some achievable goals, such as planning a get-together. Anything that may prove to be productive is the key.

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                                          20. Simply Be There

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                                            Sometimes all you can do is simply be there and that is absolutely fine. Listening and caring is worth a great deal to someone who needs to be cheered up. At times, there are simply no right words in the moment that are soothing and not potentially inappropriate. Being generous with your time says volumes about how much you truly care. Time is an important commodity and the person you care for knows it.

                                            21. Be A Friend

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                                              While it may seem simple, being a true friend is not always easy. Listening and caring for another takes time and energy, both well spent when investing in another person. Your friend will come to find this is only a temporary setback and one that can be conquered with loving support. Indeed, you are that loving support. Be a good friend and help another through by listening with an open mind and heart.

                                              22. Make An Appreciation List

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                                                Sometimes it becomes easy to indulge in all that is going wrong. Cheer someone up through helping to show them what they have to be grateful for. This will help the person feel more grounded, more connected to the world around them and to you as a dear friend. Cultivating an appreciative attitude has been proven to lower depression, increase energy, and reduce insomnia. Even when life is at its lowest, there are people and things to be grateful for. Help through making a list of those things.

                                                23. Distract, Distract, Distract

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                                                  Spend time away from the problem. Cheer someone up through providing a pleasant distraction. Dust off a board game, play some cards, or simply talk about something else. This presents an opportunity to relax and take some “time off” from the problem. Certainly, this is only a temporary solution; at some point the problem may simply go away or must be tackled. However, that decision can and probably should wait. Now is the time to free up the mind and think of something else.

                                                  24. Seize The Problem

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                                                    Sometimes the best solution is to help a friend or loved one face the problem head on. In other words—help! “Take the bull by the horns” and tackle the problem. The person in need of cheering up can “borrow” some of your strength and insight to find a workable solution. A forward momentum can also help the person get “unstuck” and move forward. While it is impossible to change the past, it is entirely possible to move ahead with confidence.

                                                    25. Think Positively

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                                                      It is easy to wallow in self-pity. Help a friend lift themselves from that pit through the power of positive thinking. Redirect energy and focus toward moving forward, away from useless negative feelings, thoughts, and emotions. In this way, you will provide a boost of positive energy, enabling the person to stop the downward plunge into depression and ultimately loss of momentum. Try to find the “silver lining” in the situation to assist in moving forward.

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                                                      Last Updated on January 15, 2019

                                                      What Are Interpersonal Skills? Master Them for Better Relationships

                                                      What Are Interpersonal Skills? Master Them for Better Relationships

                                                      When I wrote my book Extraordinary PR, Ordinary Budget: A Strategy Guide, I was surprised at the various layers of review and editing necessary to get the book to publication. Before I ever submitted the manuscript, I enlisted a former colleague to read and copy edit my work. Then, I submitted my work to an editor at the publisher’s house, and once she approved it, she sent it to her colleagues and then her company’s editorial board.

                                                      Upon editorial board approval of my book, my editor sent my work to reviewers in my field, then a developmental editor, then a designer and layout team and, finally, another copy editor. There were a host of personalities with whom I needed to interact along the way.

                                                      It turns out that getting a publishing contract was just the beginning – a lot happens between developing a concept, writing the book, finding an agent and publisher, and getting the book on bookshelves or on Audible or Kindle. Through every milestone of the publishing process, my ability to interact with others was crucial. This underscored for me that no matter what or how much a person accomplishes, you never do it alone – everyone needs assistance from others.

                                                      While I conceived of the book and wrote the manuscript, there is no way my book could have hit booksellers’ shelves without the dozens of people who were involved in the publishing process. Further, interpersonal skills can propel or stonewall success.

                                                      Even as someone who has written hundreds of essays, press releases, pitch notes and other correspondence, writing itself is not a solitary endeavor. Sure, I may write in solitude, but the moment I am finished writing, there are always clients, colleagues, partners, peers and others who review my content.

                                                      What is more, even as a published author and contributor for this platform, I try to never submit final copy (content) that has not been copy edited. I send everything to my copy editor, whom I pay out of my own pocket, for her review, edits and approval. Once she has reviewed my work, caught unbeknownst-to-me errors, I am much more confident putting my work out in the world.

                                                      How Interpersonal Skills Affect Relationships

                                                      It is clearer to me now more than ever before that interpersonal skills are needed in every profession and every trade.

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                                                      People don’t elect leaders because the leaders are smart. Individuals are motivated to vote when they have a hero and when they feel they have something to lose. If they seriously dislike the other candidate, they are much more likely vote according to a 2000 Ohio State University study:

                                                      “A disliked candidate is seen as a threat, and that will be motivation to go to the polls. But a threat alone isn’t enough – people need to have a hero to vote for, too, in order to inspire them to turn out on Election Day.”

                                                      In a work setting, interpersonal skills impact every facet of your development and success. Trainers must collaborate with a design team or the company hiring them to facilitate the training. During the training itself, the facilitators must connect with the audience and establish a rapport that supports vulnerability and openness. If the trainers interact poorly with the trainees, they are unlikely to be invited back. If they are invited back, they may be unlikely to inspire cooperation or growth in their trainees.

                                                      Solopreneurs interactions with clients and subcontractors, and those interactions will, in part, support or adversely impact their business. If you enjoy a career as an acclaimed surgeon or respected lawyer, your interactions with patients, clients, health insurance agencies and a team of other practitioners – many of whom are shielded from public view – will improve or decimate your practice.

                                                      As a hiring manager, one of the things I consider when interviewing candidates is their interpersonal skills. I assess the interpersonal skills they display in their content and face-to-face presentation. I ask probing questions to learn how they interact with others, manage conflict and contribute to a team atmosphere.

                                                      When candidates say things like, “I prefer to work alone” or “I can hit the ground running without assistance,” I bristle. When candidates appear to know everything and everyone, I wonder if they will be receptive to learning or open to feedback. Could these statements be indications that these individuals lack interpersonal skills?

                                                      It stands to reason, then, that interpersonal skills are among the most valuable and the bedrock of all talents and skills.

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                                                      What are Interpersonal Skills?

                                                      Interpersonal skills range from emotional intelligence, empathy, oral and written communication to leadership to collaboration and teamwork.

                                                      In sum, interpersonal skills are skills that enable you to interact well with others. They include teachability and receptiveness to feedback, active or mindful listening, self-confidence and conflict resolution.

                                                      From a communications standpoint, interpersonal skills are about understanding how colleagues prefer to communicate and then using the appropriate mediums to meet respective needs. It is about understanding how to communicate in a way to get the most out of different people.

                                                      For instance, in my career as a public relations practitioner, part of what I am constantly evaluating is which colleagues, clients and members of the media prefer email, text or phone calls. I am assessing how much frill to use with each person depending on what has worked in the past and depending on what I know about the person with whom I am interacting.

                                                      Making these decisions and being disciplined enough to follow each person’s known preferences helps me better connect with the various individuals in my orbit. Is this tiring at times? Yes. Is it necessary? Absolutely.

                                                      How to Improve Interpersonal Skills

                                                      There are tons of resources to teach interpersonal skills. I love books such as Leadership Presence by Belle Linda Halpern and Kathy Lubar, and The 5 Love Languages by Gary Chapman.

                                                      There are also a host of books and articles on emotional intelligence, which is the ability to manage one’s emotions and perceive and adapt to others’ emotions. Emotional intelligence is likewise a critical component of positive interpersonal relations. You can learn more about it in this article: What Is Emotional Intelligence and Why It Is Important

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                                                      Active and mindful listening also support improved interpersonal skills. I recommend you take a look at this piece: Active Listening – A Skill That Everyone Should Master

                                                      I have further found that humility helps a ton with interpersonal skills. It takes humility to admit you have more to learn and that you can learn from the people around you. In fact, everyone with whom you interact has a lesson to teach you. And employers are increasingly looking for team members who are lifelong learners, meaning they believe there is always room for growth and professional and personal development.

                                                      Forbes contributor Kevin H. Johnson noted in a July 2018 article,

                                                      “That’s why, when anyone asks what the next ‘hot’ skill will be, I say it’s the same skill that will serve people today, tomorrow, and far into the future—the ability to learn.”

                                                      Don’t overlook introspection.

                                                      While interpersonal skills may seem simple enough, introspection is critical to learning where and in what ways you need to grow.

                                                      Through introspection and observation, I have learned that my interpersonal skills suffer when I am sleep deprived, because then I am short-tempered and irritable. I’ve observed this connection over a significant period in my life. Unsurprisingly, it is also true of others. Fellow LifeHack contributor, health coach and personal trainer Jamie Logie noted:

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                                                      When you are chronically sleep deprived, it really does a number on you. A lack of sleep can keep your body in a constant state of stress and over time this can get pretty ugly. Elevated stress hormones can be involved in creating a bunch of pretty nasty conditions including anxiety, headaches and dizziness, weight gain, depression, stroke, hypertension, digestive disorders, immune system dysfunction, irritability.

                                                      Additionally, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development reported,

                                                      “Sleep deprivation can noticeably affect people’s performance, including their ability to think clearly, react quickly, and form memories. Sleep deprivation also affects mood, leading to irritability; problems with relationships, especially for children and teenagers; and depression. Sleep deprivation can also increase anxiety.”

                                                      The point is, even as you are identifying ways to improve interpersonal skills, think about what is getting in the way. While sleep deprivation is a trigger for me, your stumbling block may be different.

                                                      The Bottom Line

                                                      You cannot fix what you do not know is broken. Even as you work to understand and apply interpersonal skills, spend some time in mindful meditation to get clear on what is holding you back from developing solid relationships.

                                                      Featured photo credit: Austin Distel via unsplash.com

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