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20 Things Considerate People Don’t Do

20 Things Considerate People Don’t Do

Being considerate may seem like a very underrated virtue these days. We’re often rewarded for putting ourselves first, but being considerate can go a long way. Thanks to the “reciprocity effect,” people are more likely to reciprocate positive actions when you act positively towards them. Here’s a list of 20 things considerate people don’t actually do. Are you guilty of any of these?

1. They don’t think life is a zero sum game

Considerate people have a unique perspective, and they don’t see life as a win or lose game. They understand that life is abundant, so they spread joy and kindness as if it’s infinite. When the gym at LeBron James’s alumni high school needed an upgrade, he was kind enough to donate a million dollars to make it happen. Talk about abundance!

2. They don’t say the first thing that pops into their mind

Considerate people always think before they speak. They’re brutally honest, but share their opinion in such a tactful and thoughtful way that people don’t get offended by what they have to say.

3. They don’t ask uncomfortable questions

Considerate people hate to make others squirm. You won’t hear a considerate person asking super personal or awkward questions. They care about how others feel and make it a point to make them feel comfortable in all situations.

4. They don’t show up late

They understand that time is an important resource and that showing up late shows a lack of respect towards other people. Marilyn Monroe didn’t seem to care about being punctual, as she has been quoted saying, “I am invariably late for appointments – sometimes as much as two hours. I’ve tried to change my ways but the things that make me late are too strong, and too pleasing.” Don’t pull a Marilyn, show up on time.

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5. They don’t judge you

Considerate people know that judging others is a sure-fire way to stop them from confiding in you in the future, so they simply listen without passing judgement. They can appreciate the value of a secret and the willingness to lend an ear to someone in need.

6. They don’t give you unwarranted advice

Considerate people don’t mind giving advice, but they have a sixth sense as to when it is or isn’t warranted. They won’t talk out of turn or give out advice when someone is simply venting after a long day.

7. They don’t take acts of kindness for granted

Considerate people show their appreciation when someone acts kindly upon them, resulting in a positive feedback loop making both themselves and the other person feel good. Angelina Jolie knows the importance of showing appreciation for her fans. When a fan who had been standing in the cold for hours to catch a glimpse of the star had a panic attack, Angelina ran to her side to comfort her.

8. They don’t leave people out

Considerate people always introduce people who don’t know each other and make it a point to engage as many people as possible in a conversation. They’re hyper-aware of including everyone in any type of social interaction so no one is left out.

When a school for the deaf was disqualified from an online contest to win a Taylor Swift concert on campus because pranksters casted votes on their behalf, Taylor Swift personally donated $10,000 to the school and gave students free tickets to her concert.

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9. They don’t lose their temper easily

Considerate people may get upset, but rather than raising their voice or walking away, they know how to control their emotions so they can act rationally and objectively. Media mogul Oprah Winfrey is renowned for meditating regularly to calm both the mind and the nerves.

10. They don’t talk about themselves constantly

They understand that people love talking about themselves and they don’t let their ego get in the way of that. Instead they allow others to talk about themselves as they see fit.

11. They don’t make assumptions

Considerate people don’t assume they know your whole story, as many tend to do. Instead, they actively listen and engage, asking appropriate questions.

12. They don’t constantly put themselves first

They put others’ needs in front of their own and they’re happy to do it. Keanu Reeves famously gave away $80 million to the special effects crew of “The Matrix” as a “thank you” gesture for their hard work.

13. They don’t assume that you like what they like

They don’t think that everyone has the same tastes or preferences. They know that just because they like a certain type of movie or food, it doesn’t mean that you do as well. They’re more than open to the idea of others having different interests.

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14. They don’t forget important life events

They don’t forget birthdays, anniversaries or other important life events. They always show up for those big life moments. When “Breaking Bad” star Bryan Cranston heard a fan of his had brain cancer, he hopped on a 30 minute Skype call with the teenager and sent an ice cream truck to his house.

15. They don’t blow things out of proportion

Considerate people don’t sweat the small stuff. They don’t see problems as huge obstacles, rather they view them as challenges. They know that making small things into a big deal will only make you feel worse. When Kellie Pickler’s friend got cancer and had to go through chemotherapy she shaved her head to show her support, and when asked about it she said simply, “it’s just hair!”

16. They don’t think they know it all

Considerate people don’t pretend they know the secrets of the universe. Rather, they ask you how you feel and get your take first. When Carrie Underwood felt like she didn’t perform at her absolute best, she wasn’t shy about admitting it. Not only did she admit that she wasn’t at her best, but she also donated the proceeds from the concert to the local community!

17. They don’t harshly criticize

They will give you candid feedback, but will deliver it in a way that maintains a positive relationship and shows that they truly care.

18. They don’t equate kindness with weakness

While inconsiderate people may think that kindness is a sign of weakness, considerate people know that kindness brings joy to themselves and their community. After Kanye West and Jay-Z had an enjoyable stay at a New York City hotel, they proceeded to treat the hotel staff to the VIP treatment at their concert.

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19. They don’t interrupt you

Considerate people allow others to fully express themselves before jumping into conversations. They regularly think of others, especially when others are speaking for themselves.

20. They don’t mind giving people the benefit of the doubt

Considerate people know that life is short and that stuff happens. Rather than placing blame or jumping to conclusions, they give people the benefit of the doubt, which keeps their relationships positive and healthy.

Featured photo credit: Cristian Bernal via flic.kr

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Last Updated on September 12, 2019

12 Things You Should Remember When Feeling Lost in Life

12 Things You Should Remember When Feeling Lost in Life

Even the most charismatic people you know, whether in person or celebrities of some sort, experience days where they feel lost in life and isolated from everyone else.

While it’s good to know we aren’t alone in this feeling, the question still remains:

What should we do when we feel lost and lonely?

Here are 12 things to remember:

1. Recognize That It’s Okay!

The truth is, there are times you need to be alone. If you’ve always been accustomed to being in contact with people, this may prove difficult.

However, learning how to be alone and comfortable in your own skin will give you confidence and a sense of self reliance.

We cheat ourselves out of the opportunity to become self reliant when we look for constant companionship.

Learn how to embrace your me time: What Your Fear of Being Alone Is Really About and How to Get over It

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2. Use Your Lost and Loneliness as a Self-Directing Guide

You’ve most likely heard the expression: “You have to know where you’ve been to know where you’re going.”

Loneliness also serves as a life signal to indicate you’re in search of something. It’s when we’re in the midst of solitude that answers come from true soul searching.

Remember, there is more to life than what you’re feeling.

3. Realize Loneliness Helps You Face the Truth

Being in the constant company of others, although comforting sometimes, can often serve as a distraction when we need to face the reality of a situation.

Solitude cuts straight to the chase and forces you to deal with the problem at hand. See it as a blessing that can serve as a catalyst to set things right!

4. Be Aware That You Have More Control Than You Think

Typically, when we see ourselves as being lost or lonely, it gives us an excuse to view everything we come in contact with in a negative light. It lends itself to putting ourselves in the victim mode, when the truth of the matter is that you choose your attitude in every situation.

No one can force a feeling upon you! It is YOU who has the ultimate say as to how you choose to react.

5. Embrace the Freedom That the Feeling of Being Alone Can Offer

Instead of wallowing in self pity, which many are prone to do because of loneliness, try looking at your circumstance as a new-found freedom.

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Most people are in constant need of approval of their viewpoints. Try enjoying the fact that  you don’t need everyone you care about to support your decisions.

6. Acknowledge the Person You Are Now

Perhaps you feel a sense of loneliness and confusion because your life circumstances have taken you away from the persona that others know to be you.

Perhaps the new you differs radically from the old. Realize that life is about change and how we react to that change. It’s okay that you’re not who you used to be.

Take a look at this article and learn to accept your imperfect self: Accept Yourself (Flaws and All): 7 Benefits of Being Vulnerable

7. Keep Striving to Do Your Best

Often those who are feeling isolated and unto themselves will develop a defeatist attitude. They’ll do substandard work because their self esteem is low and they don’t care.

Never let this feeling take away your sense of worth! Do your best always and when you come through this dark time, others will admire how you stayed determined in spite of the obstacles you had to overcome.

And to live your best life, you must do this ONE thing: step out of your comfort zone.

8. Don’t Forget That Time Is Precious

When we’re lost in a sea of loneliness and depression, it’s all too easy to reflect on regrets of past life events. This does nothing but feed negativity and perpetuate the situation.

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Instead of falling prey to this common pitfall, put one foot in front of the other and acknowledge every positive step you take. By doing this, you can celebrate the struggles you overcome at the end of the day.

9. Remember, Things Happen for a Reason

Every circumstance we encounter in our life is designed to teach us and that lesson is in turn passed on to others.

Sometimes we’re fortunate enough to figure out the lesson to be learned, while other times, we simply need to have faith that if the lesson wasn’t meant directly for us to learn from, how we handled it was observed by someone who needed to learn.

Your solitude and feeling of lost, in this instance, although painful possibly, may be teaching someone else.

10. Journal During This Time

Record your thoughts when you’re at the height of loneliness and feeling lost. You’ll be amazed when you reflect back at how you viewed things at the time and how far you’ve come later.

This time (if recorded) can give you a keen insight into who you are and what makes you feel the way you feel.

11. Remember You Aren’t the First to Feel This Way

It’s quite common to feel as if we’re alone and no one else has ever felt this way before. We think this because at the time of our distress, we’re silently observing others around us who are seemingly fine in every way.

The truth is, we can’t possibly know the struggles of those around us unless they elect to share them. We ALL have known this pain!

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Try confiding in someone you trust and ask them how they deal with these feelings when they experienced it. You may be surprised at what you learn.

12. Ask for Help If the Problem Persists

The feeling of being lost and lonely is common to everyone, but typically it will last for a relatively short period of time.

Most people will confess to, at one time or another, being in a “funk.” But if the problem persists longer than you feel it should, don’t ignore it.

When your ability to reason and consider things rationally becomes impaired, do not poo poo the problem away and think it isn’t worthy of attention. Seek medical help.

Afraid to ask for help? Here’s how to change your outlook to aim high!

Final Thoughts

Loneliness and a sense of feeling lost can in many ways be extremely painful and difficult to deal with at best. However, these feelings can also serve as a catalyst for change in our lives if we acknowledge them and act.

Above anything, cherish your mental well being and don’t underestimate its worth. Seek professional guidance if you’re unable to distinguish between a sense of freedom for yourself and a sense of despair.

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Featured photo credit: Andrew Neel via unsplash.com

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