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10 Morning Habits Of Happy People

10 Morning Habits Of Happy People

Are you a morning person or a night owl? Morning people are generally happier than night owls, according to a study. Night owls tend to become morning people as they age. Whichever one you are, it is fascinating to look at the morning habits of happy people because you can be inspired by them. You can also reject what does not suit you at all, of course.

Everyone approaches mornings according to their character. Winston Churchill had a rather lazy morning routine but he still managed to lead the Allies to victory. He used to wake up at around 7.30 a.m. but would stay in bed having breakfast, reading the newspapers and dictating until 11.a.m.

Anne Wintour (editor of Vogue) has a very different morning routine in that she always gets an hour of tennis in before 6.45.a.m.

Here are 10 morning habits of happy and successful people. Choose the ones which appeal to you and fit your lifestyle.

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1. They wake up feeling grateful

As they wake up, they always feel grateful for being alive, for the gift of life and for the joy of a new day. When things are bad, make a list in your mind of all the positives.

Research shows clearly that people who regularly express gratitude are less likely to suffer from loneliness, anxiety, depression or envy.

2. They never skimp on breakfast

They know that this is the most important meal of the day. It provides you with all the essential nutrients, minerals and energy you are going to need for the day. Planning a good breakfast the night before is also a good idea. You will be able to get some of the things ready so you can save time when you are under pressure during your morning schedule.

3. They never forget the spiritual connection

“The morning wind spreads its fresh smell. We must get up and take that in, that wind that lets us live. Breathe, before it’s gone.” – Sufi, 13th century poet

As they wake up, they dedicate some time to mindfulness, prayer, meditation, yoga, or offerings to Buddha. These are all valuable ways of connecting to the present reality and savoring these precious moments before going on auto-pilot.

4. They get exercise before they start work

“I ride my bike to work because it creates a stress-free time. I get my best ideas on my bike” – Tania Burke, President of Trek Travel

Some people prefer to walk the dog early in the morning or cycle to work, if that is feasible. Other people, like President Obama, start their daily workout at 6.45.a.m. One study reveals how much more beneficial pre- breakfast exercise can be although it might not suit everybody.

5. They plan their good deeds

“The morning question, what good shall I do this day?” – Benjamin Franklin

It should come as no surprise to learn that when happy people help others it increases their happiness, rather then being a burden. Studies published in the Journal of Happiness Studies illustrate this clearly. Other studies show that these happier and kinder people will live much longer.

“Money doesn’t make people happy. People make people happy.” – Steve Wynn

6. They rarely ruminate about the past

Happy people have one thing in common. They very rarely express regrets about the past. They know that life is for living now and that to-day is the main event. They never let it be hijacked by the past or yesterday’s failures.

7. They make happiness a habit

Did you know that as much as 40% of your daily activities is sheer habit or routine? You are on auto-pilot half the time. Happy people make gratitude, joy and mindfulness a part of that habit and it always works for them, espeacially in the morning..

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8. They reject the morning distractions

Happy people know that they do not want those distractions form news, emails and text messages muscling in too early. They will damage their early morning serenity in getting their gratitude and mindfulness act together. This is what is important. Those messages can wait till much later. This also helps them to approach all the deadlines, meetings and tasks with much more serenity.

9. They have set their daily goals

Happy people know what when they do start work, they should try and get the most difficult task done first. It is just part of a list of objectives but they have always clear goals and have prioritized what they want to get done. It increases their happiness.

Richard Davidson, a neuroscientist at the University of Wisconsin has researched all this. He found that when you see progress towards achieving a difficult task or goal, this increases happiness and also suppresses all the negative emotion.

10. They have taken out a happiness subscription

When you meet happy people, they give you the impression that they have opted in for a happiness subscription. They are not waiting around or hoping vaguely for random happy events to knock on their door. They are making happiness and spreading it around. That is why they always stand out in the crowd!

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“The happy people are failures because they are on such good terms with themselves they don’t give a damn.” – Agatha Christie

Featured photo credit: Happiness is excitement……/Marcy Kellar via flickr.com

More by this author

Robert Locke

Author of Ziger the Tiger Stories, a health enthusiast specializing in relationships, life improvement and mental health.

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Last Updated on December 2, 2018

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

1. Connecting them with each other

Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

2. Connect with their emotions

Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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3. Keep going back to the beginning

Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

4. Link to your audience’s motivation

After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

5. Entertain them

While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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6. Appeal to loyalty

Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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