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20 Best Management Books That Will Make You a Great Leader

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20 Best Management Books That Will Make You a Great Leader

What makes a person a great leader? Is it a magnetic personality? Is it having a bold vision or confidence?

I would argue that all of these traits are possessed by great leaders. But how do you acquire these attributes? After all, there is such a thing as a “born leader”, but most of us who are called on to lead doesn’t fit into that category.

Fortunately, there is an abundance of information out there designed to give us the skillsets of a great leader. In this article, we listed the 20 best management books that will make you a great leader.

1. The One Minute Manager by Kenneth Blanchard Ph.D. and Spencer Johnson M.D.

    This is a remarkable book that tells the story of a young man in search of a good leader. While he encounters different management styles, some autocratic care only about results, and the workers suffered. Others with a democratic approach were only concerned with people, and the organization also suffered. Finally, he finds what he’s been looking for in a manager that uses the one-minute method.

    The one-minute method is basically a way to set clear goals or expectations for those you manage.

    For example, if you were told to clean a room, does that mean sweeping the floor, dusting the shelves, or organizing the bookshelves? But if you are told to sweep the floor and organize the bookshelves, the expectations are clearer. Then, there are one minute of praisings and one minute of reprimands where you give praise and reprimands immediately and quickly.

    Get the book here.

    2. On Becoming a Leader by Warren Bennis

      Considered a must-read for any business person, Warren Bennis was a business school professor at the University of Southern California. He got his first taste of leadership during world war 2 when he was one of the youngest lieutenants to serve in Europe. He is a firm believer that leaders are made, not born.

      This one of the best management books out there. It outlines several traits that make up a great leader. For Bennis, a leader is self-aware, curious, and are risk-takers. A leader sees the big picture and does what is right.

      Get the book here.

      3. Turn the Ship Around!: A True Story of Turning Followers Into Leaders by L. David Marquet

        Marquet was the captain of a submarine and was trained to lead in the typical military fashion of issuing orders and getting results. However, one time he gave an order that was impossible to follow, but his crew tried anyway with near-disastrous results. When he asked why, the answer was “because you told me to”.

        That’s when he decided to try a different management style, giving those under him the responsibility for their job and the autonomy to do it. The results from the change in his management style were significant.

        Get the book here.

        4. Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t by Simon Sinek

          Why do some teams come together to get the task done while other teams disintegrate into squabbling, infighting, and backstabbing?

          Sinek tackles this question in Leaders Eat Last after he had a conversation with a Marine Corps general. He noticed that all the junior Marines ate first, while the most senior Marines were all at the back of the line. The general explained that “leaders eat last” because what was symbolic in the chow hall was deadly serious in war.

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          Leaders need to sacrifice their own comfort and even their lives for the good of the team they lead. He goes on to illustrate his ideas through examples of true stories in business and military.

          Get the book here.

          5. How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

            A list of the best management books will not be complete without this book by Carnegie. This is probably one of the most famous books on leadership ever written, and that’s for good reason.

            Carnegie reveals some of the “soft skills” of good leadership, such as making people feel important and appreciated. Implementing the ideas found in this classic will help you be a better leader, negotiator, and motivator.

            Get the book here.

            6. The Art of War by Sun Tzu

              Written over two thousand years ago, this is still touted by business people all over the world as a must-read for leaders. Sun Tzu was a military leader who put his philosophies regarding war and leadership to paper.

              It is filled with timeless wisdom such as “Avoid what is strong and strike at what is weak.” and “Supreme excellence rests in breaking the enemy’s resistance without fighting”.

              The book is divided into thirteen chapters and each one is devoted to a certain philosophy.

              Get the book here.

              7. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change by Stephen R. Covey

                Another classic, Covey is widely known as a world-renowned leadership expert. Although he already has other published works, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People is his most famous one.

                Covey’s idea is that true leadership starts from within. A good leader must first manage their inner well-being, create a personal vision, and cultivate self-control. Only then can they extend their influence to others.

                Here’s a short video on the 7 habits of highly successful people:

                Get the book here.

                8. The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership: Follow Them and People Will Follow You by John Maxwell

                  One of the most popular books on leadership of all time, Maxwell’s The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership is one of the best management books you can find.

                  Maxwell contends that while there may be more “laws” of leadership than 21, these 21 laws are true and needed for anyone to be effective. Furthermore, these laws apply to all leadership roles in society, be they be in the military, business, or government.

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                  Get the book here.

                  9. Swim With the Sharks Without Being Eaten Alive By Harvey B. Mackay

                    Written by a self-made millionaire, Mackay gives practical advice on how to outsell your competition and motivate your employees. It’s a short read filled with useful and practical ideas. It contains much helpful advice like “If You Don’t Have a Destination, You’ll Never Get There,” “Make Decisions with Your Heart and What You’ll End Up with Is Heart Disease,” and “It isn’t the people you fire who make your life miserable, it’s the people you don’t”.

                    Get the book here.

                    10. Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert B. Cialdini Ph.D.

                      Dr. Robert Cialdini spent his entire career researching the science of influence, earning him an international reputation as an expert in the fields of persuasion, compliance, and negotiation.

                      In his book, Influence, The Psychology of Persuasion, he breaks down the principles of influence and persuasion into six categories that are easy to understand and implement. This book will teach you not only how to persuade others but also how to protect yourself from deceptive persuasion.

                      Get the book here.

                      11. Leadership and Self-Deception: Getting Out of the Box by The Arbinger Institute

                        This book might be a hard read, not because of the concepts involved or the language used, but because it forces the reader to confront their responsibility for problems. Most of us like to blame things outside of us for the problems we have. But in order to truly find solutions, you need to be able to see your role in the problem.

                        The Arbinger Institute is recognized as a world leader in improving organizational effectiveness and conflict resolution.

                        Get the book here.

                        12. Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter by Liz Wiseman

                          A Wall Street Journal bestseller, this relatively short, 292-page read talks about two leadership styles.

                          In this book, leadership expert Liz Wiseman explores these two leadership styles, persuasively showing how Multipliers can have a resoundingly positive and profitable effect on organizations.

                          Multipliers are the ones who get more done with fewer resources, develop and attract talent, and cultivate new ideas and energy to drive organizational change and innovation. On the other hand, Diminishers are the type of people who drain creativity and innovation from their teams.

                          Get the book here.

                          13. My Years With General Motors by Alfred Sloan Jr.

                            This is another management book that’s considered a “classic”. First published in 1963, Sloan’s My Years With General Motors became an instant bestseller. The author talks about the “discipline of management” that he has practiced for decades and which made him an effective leader.

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                            Still relevant today, Bill Gates praises this book as the best book on management. Even Business Week named it “the number one choice for its bookshelf of indispensable reading.”

                            Get the book here.

                            14. Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration by Ed Catmull and Amy Wallace

                              This New York Times bestseller was produced by the co-founder of Pixar Studios – the people behind some of the most famous and successful films of all time. In this book, the authors explore the leadership qualities that have made Pixar so successful.

                              Readers can find many great ideas in this book such as, “Give a good idea to a mediocre team, and they will screw it up. But give a mediocre idea to a great team, and they will either fix it or come up with something better,” and “It’s not the manager’s job to prevent risks. It’s the manager’s job to make it safe for others to take them”.

                              Get the book here.

                              15. Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity by Kim Scott

                                Kim Scott was an executive at Google and later Apple. In this insightful book about leadership and management, she shares her years of knowledge about how to be an effective leader.

                                Her fundamental belief is that a leader must truly care while still challenging employees directly. If you don’t really care, it’s authoritarian. If you don’t challenge, it’s bad for the company. And if you do neither, it’s just manipulative.

                                Get the book here.

                                16. Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink

                                  Another New York Times bestseller, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us crushes the notion of the carrot and stick method of management.

                                  In this book, Pink examines the difference between what science knows motivates us and what most businesses do. He postulates that people are motivated by three things, autonomy, mastery, and purpose. So, if you can provide them those things you will have a productive and efficient team.

                                  Get the book here.

                                  17. Primal Leadership: Unleashing the Power of Emotional Intelligence by Daniel Goleman, Richard Boyatzis & Annie McKee

                                    What’s the most important attribute of a leader? Intelligence, motivation, vision?

                                    The authors of this book put forth the argument that “emotional intelligence” is the critical factor for leadership. for them, qualities like enthusiasm, empathy, relationship management, intuitive understanding are qualities possessed by great leaders.

                                    Using many real-world examples, the authors try to define and explain those key qualities. Good leaders bring out “resonance” among a team, while poor ones create “dissonance.”

                                    Get the book here.

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                                    18. The Truth About Leadership: The No-fads, Heart-of-the-Matter Facts You Need to Know by James M. Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner

                                      In this book, the authors spell out ten “truths” about leadership. One of these is credibility, which is the foundation of leadership. A leader values and drives commitment, and the best leaders are the best learners.

                                      According to the authors, you either lead by example or you don’t lead at all. All of these truths must be understood by any great leader and you neglect them at your own peril.

                                      Get the book here.

                                      19. Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passion, and Purpose by Tony Hsieh

                                        Tony Hsieh is the founder of Zappos, an online retailer that does over one billion dollars in sales annually.

                                        In this book, he explains his secrets to success. Some of the strategies he outlined include giving you employees control over their jobs (autonomy), acknowledging and encouraging progress both professionally and personally, connecting with your team personally, and being someone people would want to work for, among many others.

                                        If you are interested in having your own business or just in managing people, this is a great read.

                                        Get the book here.

                                        20. The Leadership Challenge: How to Make Extraordinary Things Happen in Organizations by James Kouzes and Posner

                                          Last but not the least, we have The Leadership Challenge, which is one of the best management books ever written.

                                          Considered the “gold standard” of leadership manuals, The Leadership Challenge explores the difference between good leaders and great leaders. The authors outlined 5 practices of exemplary leadership: model the way, inspire a shared vision, challenge the process, enable others to act, and encourage the heart.

                                          Anyone looking for great management and leadership books has to add this to their list.

                                          Get the book here.

                                          The Bottom Line

                                          Leadership is both an art and a skill. And while you can’t teach the art part of leadership, you can acquire the skills of a leader.

                                          This list of 20 best management books is by no means exhaustive, but by gaining the insights that they possess, you will be better equipped to lead.

                                          In effect, the knowledge you can acquire from these books will have you standing on the shoulders of giants.

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                                          Featured photo credit: Daria Nepriakhina via unsplash.com

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                                          David Carpenter

                                          Lifelong entrepreneur and business owner helping others to realize the American Dream of business ownership

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                                          Last Updated on January 13, 2022

                                          How to Use Travel Time Effectively

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                                          How to Use Travel Time Effectively

                                          Most of us associate travel and time with what we’re going to do one we get to our destination. Planning and mapping out what to do once you arrive can certainly make for a more pleasurable vacation, but there are things you can do while you are on your way that can make it even better.

                                          Sure, you can plan for the things you’re going to do on your vacation while you are travelling en route – but what about making use of that time for other things that you don’t usually do when you’re at home? You don’t need to have your gadgets with you to do it, and you can really connect with yourself if you take the time to manage your life while heading towards your vacation destination.

                                          Here are some great tips to help you with your time management while you travel, some of which are more conventional than others. Nonetheless, you can find out what works best for you and apply them accordingly depending on when and how you are travelling.

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                                          1. Take Your Time Getting There

                                          As I write this, I’m on a flight to San Francisco. Flying is the fastest way to get from place to place, and for many people it’s really the only way to travel.

                                          But I’ve often taken the train or ferry on trips so that I have extra time without distraction to get more done. I’m not worrying about navigation or lack of space to do what I want to do. Instead I’m able to focus on getting stuff done during the time I’ve got without feeling rushed. For example, when I took the train from Vancouver to Portland, it was an eight hour trip and I managed to get a ton of writing done and closed a lot of open loops. It also was less expensive than flying, which was a bonus.

                                          Sometimes taking the long way to get somewhere on vacation can be the best thing for you to get somewhere with your life.

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                                          2. Go Gadget-Free

                                          This is going to be a tough one for a lot of you. But why do you need to bring your gadgets with you when you go on vacation? It isn’t be a bad idea to leave all but one of them behind, and only pull out that one when you absolutely need to do so. In some countries, you’d be wise to be discreet with them anyway since flaunting them in front of those that are less fortunate than you isn’t a good practice. While it may not seem like flaunting to you, in different cultures it can definitely come across that way.

                                          If you can’t go gadget-free, then at least go Internet-free. If you use a task management app that requires syncing across your multiple devices to be effective, remember that if you only have the one device with you then it can be the “master device” for the time being and will store your data locally anyway. Just sync up when you get home.

                                          3. Reflect and Prepare

                                          Finally, going on any sort of excursion gives you the perfect opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been. The fact you have removed yourself from where you usually are can give you a perspective that you simply can’t get when you’re at home. You may want to journal your thoughts during this time – and by taking more time to get to your destination you’ll have more time to dig deeper into it.

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                                          After a period of reflection – however long that happens to be – you can then begin to not only prepare for the rest of your travels, you can prepare for the rest of what happens afterward. The reflection period is important, though. You need to really know where you’ve been in order to properly look at where you want to be. Time away from things gives you that chance.

                                          Conclusion

                                          Traveling isn’t always about where you’re going and how quickly you can get there. In fact, it’s rarely about that at all.

                                          More often it’s where you’re at in your head that will dictate how much you benefit from traveling. So don’t just go somewhere fast. Instead, take your time on the way there and take the time to connect with not only where you are but who are while you’re there.

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                                          If you do that, you’ll have a better chance to be who you want to be when you leave.

                                          Featured photo credit: bruce mars via unsplash.com

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